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Features

Our Neighbors in Sandy Hook

The Harbor Seals of Point Pleasant


The mackerels were flying back and forth, bubbles were being blown and fins were flapping. Then, I got a kiss from a harbor seal; a soft, moist velvet kiss on my forehead. So excuse me if I seem like a sucker for these guys, because I am.

But my story doesn’t start with the kiss. It starts at Sandy Hook on a January morning during low tide. A warm day for that time of year, the sun seemed to rise just for me, following my footsteps as I walked towards the sand bar on the bay side of Sandy Hook. T he sunbeams warmed me and I left my jacket unbuttoned.

New Jersey’s beaches in the winter are beautiful, unbeknownst to most local residents or seasonal tourists. Sandy Hook is no exception. While the “bennies” are back home in the north, hundreds of seals take to the sandbars and seas. The most common species is the Western Atlantic Harbor seal, but grey, harp, and hooded seals are also seen. All of these are categorized under the mammal subheading known as pinniped, which means “fin-footed” in Latin.

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What to Know About Living Off-Campus

As students move up in their college careers, many develop a desire to live off-campus. While many look forward to making the transition from on-campus to off, there are responsibilities and things to keep in mind that go into living on your own.

Finding a Rental

There are multiple things to consider when looking for a rental. Numerous and varied housing options are offered to students and those should determine what type of housing they want before contacting landlords and realtors.

One of the options is to live in an apartment building; which there are many large and small apartment buildings in the Monmouth University area. Apartment buildings generally contain studio to two bedroom units. Houses are another option where you can find single, two, and three bedroom houses in areas surrounding the University.

“I like living in a house because there is more space to move around,” said junior David DeSimone.

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Former Hawks Take Over Seaside Park and Become Nostalgic of MU

Two Hawks, two generations and two winnings for the Seaside Park Council. That is the story for alums Robert Matthies, class of 1972, and David Nicola, class of 2000. Both individuals ran for the Seaside Park Council this past November; Matthies was elected as Mayor and Nicola as Councilman. With just a few months under their belts in their new positions, the two former Hawks had some time to discuss serving Seaside Park, as well as to recall some fond memories on the Monmouth campus.

This is not the first time Mayor Matthies has represented Seaside Park in an executive capacity. He was Mayor from 2004 to 2007, chose to take a few years off, and has now reprised his role. “I ran again because of the strong support of the community. I’ve been in elected council for 20 years, and I’ve always felt obligated to my community, and if that means being in a leadership role, then so be it,” Matthies says.

As Mayor, he is Chief Executive Officer of the borough representing citizens of the Seaside Park community. Although the town’s population is 1,500 in the offseason, there are around 40,000 full-time residents in the summer – which does not include visitors to the beaches.

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Twins: Double is Better

What it’s Like to be a Twin


They always say two is better than one, and boy, are they right. Double the trouble, double the noise, double the mess, just double everything. When one thinks of twins, some first thoughts may be that they finish each other’s sentences, read each other’s minds, and even dress in coordinating outfits. But beyond the surface of similar features and mannerisms lies many other characteristics that aren’t displayed straight out of the gate.

To those who grew up with large age gaps in between siblings, twins are born with a built in playmate. Michael Pearson, senior communication major and a twin, said, “I was never bored growing up, because my brother was always around. We didn’t have to play video games all the time because there was always someone to play catch with or play sports against. Also, my brother and I were always on a team against our parents during arguments, so it was good to have backup,” he said.

A common question asked of twins is, “Do you ever get bothered by being associated with each other?” Josh Lewis, senior business major, said, “When I was growing up, I went through periods of time when I hated being associated with my twin, Ben. I always tried to be independent and never liked being referred to as one of ‘the twins.’ Now though, I don’t mind it.” Lewis also said that since both his brother and himself have gone to college, they have actually grown closer than they were before.

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A Separation from Divorce

How Divorce Affects Students and Society


divorce-cake

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the current divorce rate in our country is up to 50 percent. That means that when a couple gets married, there is a 50 percent chance that the marriage will end in a divorce.

Alan Foster, sociology professor, said that part of the problem with divorce is that it is too easy to get married in this country.

“You don’t have to take a test and all you need is a couple of bucks and a license. We have a lot of freedom in this country to marry anybody we choose, which could be part of the reason why people get married for the wrong reasons,” said Foster.

Foster also suggested that maybe there is a need for some sort of a pre-marital test to see if people are prepared. People need to make sure they’re with the right person, they have enough money, and they are ready and mature enough to handle being married.

When a family goes through a divorce, they must experience the pain that both sides go through and the sadness that is felt if children are involved. They no longer get to grow up in a normal household, but instead have to live with one parent and see the other one from time to time. It changes everything for everyone involved and can leave a lasting effect. 

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Blinded by the Light: The Real Cost of Indoor Tanning

tanning

It’s burning up more and more by the second. The bright lights blind you, but you don’t want to place the eye protectors across your eyelids in fear of leaving spots or an uneven tone on your face. You lie there, completely at peace with music playing above your head, outside the box. Twelve minutes pass, the lights come down and immediately, you feel a rush of cool air as the heat vanishes. As you’re getting dressed, you catch a glance of yourself in the mirror, let out a sigh and smile, thinking it’s all worth it. Even in the early weeks of spring, you’re magically walking around with a sun-kissed tan as if you just came back from the Bahamas. Fact check: that invigorating feeling of confidence may not last as long as the chemicals in your body will.

Indoor tanning is said to be as danger as it a luxury for people. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, more than one million people tan in tanning salons. Moreover, 70 percent of patrons are women aged 16 to 29, ages that include college students.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu