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Last updateWed, 20 Sep 2017 1pm

Features

Living With a 24/7 Bully

Samantha CaramelaSamantha Caramela is constantly bullying herself. Every day and night since she was a little girl, this “24/7 bully” inside Caramela has been telling her that she is selfish, a harm to others, and that she doesn’t deserve love. This bully is making Caramela fear herself consistently, but Caramela is finding a way to defend herself. This bully is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

“Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder of the brain and behavior, causing severe anxiety and involving obsessions and compulsions that take a lot of time and get in the way of important activities the person values,” according to the International OCD Foundation.

Samantha is affected by obsessions, which are thoughts that occur out of her control on a daily basis. Her scariest obsessions are triggered by circumstances, big or small. At a young age, one of her triggers was throwing up, while another was the thought of a family member’s death.

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Graduate Studies Spotlight: History and Anthropology

With a growing demand in the current job market for men and women with skills revolving around history and anthropology, the University’s graduate programs for each of these fields provide students with just the right amount of experience both inside and outside of the classroom to help them get to where they want to be after they earn their degree.

With students who have ended up working for the National Park Service, the American Red Cross, the American Museum of Natural History, the Port Authority, and a number of other various state and county agencies, it is clear that the University’s History and Anthropology programs are the perfect way for students to prepare themselves for the real world.

“Students leave with research, writing, and critical thinking skills,” said Richard Veit, Chair of the History and Anthropology Department at the University. He continued to explain that although most classes in the program are small seminars, many hands-on courses are also offered to the students enrolled, particularly those that are focusing on archaeology.

There is an Ancient Technology class, for example, in which students recreate ancient technologies, “from fire and flintknapping to plowing with mules and shearing sheep,” said Veit. Experiences like those offered by that class in particular create a clear picture of the kind of work that students will be conducting after they graduate.

Those involved in the Anthropology program also “learn how to use geographic information systems (GIS, a computer system for capturing, storing, checking, and displaying data related to positions on Earth’s surface), address anthropological questions, how to carry out ethnographic fieldwork, and for those who are archaeologically inclined, they learn the lab and field skills necessary to secure a job in cultural resource management,” Veit explained.

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University Students Visit Guatemala for Class

MU Students GuatemalaIt was truly an amazing experience to go to Guatemala and immerse myself in a new culture. Five University students, including myself, who were enrolled in Dr. Chris Hirschler’s Guatemala Public Health course, traveled to Guatemala to educate the Las Amigas, rural communities, and children in the area. The Las Amigas are men and women from rural areas who are trained to promote good health in their communities that are connected to Salud y Paz.

Salud y Paz is a clinic in Guatemala that was started by an American dentist when he saw how poor most Guatemalans’ oral hygiene was. Now, Salud y Paz has grown and is serving the people of Guatemala at a low cost due to donations, volunteers, and spreading the word.

Katie Slage is the community health and surgery coordinator at Salud y Paz. She has been working with the clinic for almost three years now. When I asked her how she got started with this project, it seemed like fate. Katie said she was working as a registered nurse in Florida and began to hate her job. She wasn’t sure what her next move would be, and then her friend said she was going to Guatemala for three months to explore and jump into a new culture.

While she was there, she ran into the community health coordinator of Salud y Paz, Heather. It didn’t take much to convince Katie to take over Heather’s job. Heather was there visiting the clinic when we were there, as she frequently returns even though she is not a full-time employee there anymore.

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Graduate Studies Spotlight: Speech-Language Pathology

It was truly an amazing experience to go to Guatemala and immerse myself in a new culture. Five University students, including myself, who were enrolled in Dr. Chris Hirschler’s Guatemala Public Health course, traveled to Guatemala to educate the Las Amigas, rural communities, and children in the area. The Las Amigas are men and women from rural areas who are trained to promote good health in their communities that are connected to Salud y Paz.

Salud y Paz is a clinic in Guatemala that was started by an American dentist when he saw how poor most Guatemalans’ oral hygiene was. Now, Salud y Paz has grown and is serving the people of Guatemala at a low cost due to donations, volunteers, and spreading the word.

Katie Slage is the community health and surgery coordinator at Salud y Paz. She has been working with the clinic for almost three years now. When I asked her how she got started with this project, it seemed like fate. Katie said she was working as a registered nurse in Florida and began to hate her job. She wasn’t sure what her next move would be, and then her friend said she was going to Guatemala for three months to explore and jump into a new culture.

While she was there, she ran into the community health coordinator of Salud y Paz, Heather. It didn’t take much to convince Katie to take over Heather’s job. Heather was there visiting the clinic when we were there, as she frequently returns even though she is not a full-time employee there anymore.

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Lisa: The Seeing Eye Pup in Training

Seeing Eye Lisa TrainingIt’s early in the morning and little paws are running around the backyard and being walked down the street in preparation for a long day ahead. These little paws belong to Seeing Eye dog in training, Lisa Kretsch.

Lisa needs plenty of activity in the morning if she will be spending the day at the University with her trainer, Chair of the Computer Science and Software Engineering Department, Jamie Kretsch. Her next few morning routine steps include breakfast, picking a Seeing Eye vest or scarf, and saying goodbye to her brother Buddy and sister Enya at home.

When at the University, she recognizes many faces of her “special friends” on campus, including many people from the Computer Science and Software Engineering Department, the Math Department, and First Year Advising.

Lisa is currently 11 months old and will be staying with Kretsch until she is one year old; Kretsch has plenty of experience in training dogs for The Seeing Eye; Lisa is the fourth dog that Kretsch has raised for the cause. Kretsch is a leader for the Monmouth County Seeing Eye Club and has been a participant in puppy raising for the society since 2003.

Being that Kretsch has been exposed to many different dogs in training and is in contact with canine graduates of the program, it is safe to say that when she says that Lisa’s progress is beautiful, we can take her word for it.

“She handles everything with utmost poise and dignity; she’s amazing,” Kretsch gushed about Lisa’s progress. “Lisa is gentle and seems to understand what appropriate behavior would be necessary for where she is,” continued Kretsch.

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Holly Migliaccio’s Quest for Happiness Leads to Rook Coffee

Rook CoffeeA coffee lover can walk into any of the 10 locations with the prestigiously known black crow imprinted on the doorway as they are hit with the positively potent aroma of brewing coffee infused with a bit of charisma and joy.

Rook, the popular local brand of coffee that can be commonly found in the hands of University students at any time during the day, belongs to the entrepreneurial visionary, Holly Migliaccio. Migliaccio, the co-founder and owner of Rook Coffee, said that Rook focuses on three aspects: quality, simplicity, and experience.

“We are constantly trying to get the product to be better and better and better,” Migliaccio said. “We want to make sure that its product is always at its best.” Not only does Migliaccio and her business partner and co-founder of Rook, Shawn Kingsley, focus on quality coffee, but they also emphasize the importance of quality relationships with their customers and even the farmers who supply the coffee beans.

Migliaccio believes that staying focused as business owners on exactly what they are good at is key in terms of simplicity. “We are good at coffee,” Migiaccio said. “It’s a very, very simple process. It’s all about Rook, all about the coffee, all about the conversation.”

Migliaccio and Kingsley do not wholesale their coffee even though they receive hundreds upon hundreds of requests for its vending in grocery stores, restaurants, etcetera. “We are good at serving a cup of coffee over the counter in a retail setting. We want to open more stores, spread our footprint, and do what we know how to do.”

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Capturing Moments and Recognition: One MU Student’s Photographic Legacy

When the Monmouth Hawks host a sporting event at one of their facilities in West Long Branch, NJ, there are a few staples; these include Shadow the Hawk hyping up the crowd, cheering fans waving blue and white flags, and Taylor Jackson holding a camera. The 21-year-old photography major from Westtown, NY is the official photographer for Monmouth Athletics.

Prior to Jackson’s arrival at the University, the school’s photographer, whose responsibilities included documenting all events occurring on campus, served as the primary person to collect photos for MU Athletics. However, due to a busy schedule, he would only be available to document certain sporting events.

Therefore, the University’s Assistant Athletics Director, Eddy Occhipinti, was interested in hiring a photographer to document games and assist with marketing efforts.

After meeting Jackson at a job fair in 2012, Occhipinti decided to create a new position: Monmouth Athletics photographer. “Thankfully, Taylor wanted to expand her role with us and got into shooting our games both at home and on the road,” he said.

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Inspired by Ireland, Fueled By Coffee

The traditional Irish proverb, “giorraionn beirt bothar,” translated as, “two people shorten a road,” means that companionship makes time fly, and is a truth that Irish Coffee Radio hosts Jamie Griffin and Elizabeth White live by. Together, the two friends spend Saturday mornings from 10 to 12 on the University’s WMCX radio station playing Irish music and chatting about all things Irish, from the poetry of William Butler Yeats to what the colors green and orange represent.

“For this particular show, you have to be into Irish culture, history and Ireland itself,” said Jamie, “otherwise, you wouldn’t know what we’re talking about, or the meanings behind certain songs.” Jamie, a senior elementary education and history student with a minor in Irish studies, has family in Ireland and even speaks the Gaelic language. “My dad’s parents only moved here in 1948, so it hasn’t been a long time since my family left Ireland. I have two aunts that still live in Ireland,” said Jamie, “but they’re nuns, so they probably don’t listen to our show,” she joked.

“Jamie’s family is a lot more connected to Ireland than my family,” conceded Elizabeth, “but we’re both Irish. My family came to America from County Cork during the Irish Potato Famine and never left.” Irish Coffee Radio not only connects Jamie and Elizabeth to their Irish heritages, but also gives them a greater appreciation of their own cultures.

“Doing the show made me appreciate my heritage more, and it made me appreciate my culture. I’m an Irish American, and I didn’t realize how Irish I was raised until I did the show and realized I can relate to all these songs about Irish culture,” said Elizabeth, as Jamie fervently agreed.

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The Tale of Godzilla Boy

With a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound, a 4-year-old boy fashions his hands into claws and jumps up and down. The young boy has nothing but an old Godzilla t-shirt on and Spaghettio sauce dripping from the corners of his mouth. He watches gleefully as Godzilla rampages through the streets of Tokyo, knocking over buildings and stepping on innocent civilians. The boy mimics Godzilla’s walk and suddenly lets out a ferocious roar that would put Godzilla himself to shame.

This little boy is now 25, yet still has a child-like obsession with the King of the Monsters. My brother, Ian, has loved Godzilla for as long as I have known. Before I could even walk, I knew who Godzilla was thanks to him.

Our mother, Bonnie, said, “At first he was afraid of them and he wouldn’t watch it with me. He would watch it in another room, stand there and just look. Then, he would get closer, and closer, and closer until he was right next to me.”

As Ian grew older, his obsession with Godzilla grew to gargantuan proportions just like the beast that fascinated him. “He had me tell him everything about Godzilla,” Bonnie said, “then, he wanted a toy. Then, he got an 8-pack of all the big monsters. That led to more, and more, and more.”

Ian would play his old Godzilla VHS tapes over and over until the images of monsters fighting was embedded into our whole family’s brains. Ian, who has special needs, has always responded to science fiction and action on television and video games. “He liked every time the monsters would fight and destroy. Godzilla’s roar and fire hooked him,” said Bonnie.

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The Life of a Backstage Rockstar

Monmouth Alum Works Behind the Scenes for Billy Joel


The lights dim, the crowd roars, the band walks out on stage. The speakers erupt with the sounds of guitar and drums, and the show finally begins. Mesmerized by the performance in front of them, concertgoers in the audience think nothing of the people behind the scenes who are working the lights, the sound, and the special effects being played on the screen behind the band; people like Kaitlyn Baklarz, who could easily be considered artists themselves.

Baklarz is an employee of Live Nation Entertainment, an American entertainment company that owns, leases, and operates a number of entertainment venues around the country. She works as a stagehand at PNC Bank Arts Center during the summer, and occasionally as an Assistant Dressing Room Coordinator for concerts at the Prudential Center, Barclays, Izod, and Madison Square Garden, where she is currently working on the Billy Joel Tour.

“I’ve grown up in the industry since birth as my uncles and dad are in it as well,” Baklarz said. Her uncle works as the lead rigger at PNC Bank Arts Center, her grandfather started working at the venue when it first opened, and her dad is the Steward of Local 536, a union within The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States. “That’s three generations,” Baklarz said.

As a stagehand, Baklarz is one of the many people responsible for setting up the stage for whichever artist is performing; just about everything necessary to put on a show except the artist themselves is handled and put into place by Baklarz.

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“Blackfish” Creator Surprised by SeaWorld Changes

It should have been fun - sitting in the Splash Zone at SeaWorld’s Shamu stadium with her two sons, watching killer whales perform impressive tricks. Instead, Gabriela Cowperthwaite felt a pit in her stomach. Seeing whales up-close in captivity made her uneasy. So she began looking into the theme park, working on a documentary called “Blackfish” - a 2013 film that would ultimately shift the way the public viewed the multibillion-dollar corporation too.

Just three years after the release of “Blackfish,” SeaWorld CEO Joel Manby announced Thursday in an op-ed published in the Los Angeles Times that the company would stop breeding orcas this year. That means that the 29 killer whales currently owned by the theme park will be the last to swim in SeaWorld tanks. The remaining orcas will live out the remainder of their lives at the company’s three SeaWorld-branded parks in Orlando, San Antonio and San Diego but will not perform in theatrical shows by 2019.

“We are proud of contributing to the evolving understanding of one of the world’s largest marine mammals,” Manby wrote. “Now we need to respond to the attitudinal change that we helped to create.”

Though Manby made no reference to “Blackfish” in his op-ed, the film was largely responsible for that “attitudinal change.” The documentary was released in theaters in July 2013 and went on to gross $2.1 million. But the film really began to make waves after it aired in October of that year on CNN, where the movie has since been broadcast more than 30 times and been seen by nearly 30 million viewers, according to the cable network.

“It’s exceedingly rare to see this kind of result,” said Amy Entelis, the co-founder of CNN Films, which acquired “Blackfish” at Sundance in January 2013. “There are a lot of good stories out there, but they don’t always see the final chapter that Gabriela is seeing at this point. We’ve had other documentaries about Steve Jobs and Glen Campbell attract many viewers during their premieres, but ‘Blackfish’ endures even after multiple viewings. It’s had a deeper impact and has been seen by far more people.”

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu