Friday, October 09th, 2015

The Debate Over Minimum Wage PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 02 October 2013 11:11

I would go out on a limb and say that most of us work pretty hard for our well-earned cash. Now, would you work even harder if you were offered more cash? Of course you would.

Money is not everything and no, money does not buy happiness. Let’s be realistic; it does buy gas, food, clothes and other important things that are basically necessities.

Many young adults and college students are just starting out on their own two feet, struggling with having to pay their own bills and supporting themselves all while balancing a job with their education.

So understandably, more money is an incentive to work even harder. The point is that it’s time minimum wage is increased. 

Many basic or entry level jobs are the ones paying minimum wage; a measly $7.25 per hour.

However, the biggest dilemma we are faced with is the current economic hardship and an even more competitive job market where you must have the skills and experience to get a decent job while earning big bucks.

That however, puts many young, educated but frankly inexperienced individuals at a serious disadvantage. Young adults step out of college and are often left with a huge amount of debt in loans.

They are then faced with the daunting task of not only finding a substantial career to be able to start paying those giant loans back, but establishing some credit to maybe purchase a new car or place to live.

Furthermore, in order to do all of those things, you have to already have money, credit or something to show. Again, when young people are just entry level employees, many times they are receiving minimum wage or comparable.

Since many employers utilize minimum wage employees, it becomes the base line off which other employers set higher wages.

In other words, even if you are just starting out and you are indeed making more than the ludicrous $7.25 per hour, and let’s hope that you are, the rate or salary you are earning may still be lower than it should be, or even has the potential to be because minimum wage is so low.

Another negative contributing factor is that in the past four years since the last time minimum wage was increased, household expenses have increased dramatically.

I am sure we can all agree these things are necessities. So, if prices are being driven up, then minimum wage should too – right? Apparently not. It is unrealistic to believe that a certain standard of living can be met at that rate.

Not only is it unrealistic to think that people can support themselves on the current minimum wage, but an increase in minimum wage would also create better employees who take pride in their work, have ambition to grow, and contribute more to their companies and corporations.

In the current economic state, increasing minimum wage would do far more good than harm and would benefit not only young adults or recently graduated college students, but everyone. 



Stop Trying to Make Basic Happen
10/07/2015 | THE OUTLOOK STAFF

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As the month of October is upon us, along with UGG boots and warm sweaters, our generation’s made up term “basic” will be seen all over social media as fast as you could say pumpkin spice latte.
According to Urban Dictionary, the term “basic” describes someone who is obscenely obvious in behavior, dress, or action. A picture of a girl dressed in fall attire with a Starbucks drink in hand, is considered basic. Engaging in fall activities and posting about it on Instagram will have the hashtag #basic below the caption. Basic has a negative connotation and really cannot be used to describe someone’s style or choice of drink.   The first trace of this term can be found in a comedy routine by Lil Duval in 2009, according to In the following years, the term gained popularity all over the Internet with captions and hashtags using the basic to describe people and lifestyles. The Outlook editors are divided when it comes to the te ...


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