Sat04292017

Last updateThu, 20 Apr 2017 10am

Top Banner Ad place

Editorial

Volume 84 (Fall 2012 - Spring 2013)

Since When Did the Holidays Become so Expensive?

Christmas as a child used to involve Santa Claus and snow forts. At our current ages, Christmas has come to mean purchasing the most expensive present, most likely a technology-based gift, in order to show we care. The typical Christmas present is no longer a handmade craft which we give to our parents, but instead range anywhere from the iPhone to the Kindle. So what has caused the standard price for holiday gifts to raise in recent years?

There are various reasons as to why the price we spend on those we care about has increased. One thought is perhaps the price is too heavily enforced, especially in the media. Commercialism has put too much emphasis on cost and has many believing they not only want, but need, all these luxurious items.

The media also enforces the notion that quality reigns supreme. A prime example of this marketing strategy can be seen amongst jewelers nationwide. They make sure to include in commercials and advertisements that if you truly love someone, then you will buy their product as a sign of that love. It is a true shame such a special holiday has been so overtaken by commercialism.

There is another economic force at work increasing our holiday spending. The financial scapegoat is inflation, which has been affecting Americans for years. It happens every year and we as consumers cannot stop it but only contribute to it. Thus, the increased cost of a present could simply be inflation.

The theory of inflation goes handin- hand with why Cyber Monday and Black Friday have gained so much attention and marketing in these past years. When prices have been raised, but you still are on a budget, these commercially marketed days are the only ways you can stay on budget and purchase gifts your family and friends really want.

Along with these two big market days, things such as lay-away have become commonly used. Lay-away no longer creates the mindset to have money immediately but instead can be paid over a period of time.

Read more ...

Thank You For Everything President Gaffney

As the school year comes to a close, some of us say goodbye to the University for good, while others simply say “see ya later.” However, this concluding school year is not only bittersweet for graduating seniors but at the end of May, President Gaffney will also be saying his final goodbye.

Even though he will be missed, he will not be forgotten. Gaffney has truly left a lasting impression during his 10 years as President. Here at The Outlook we f eel t hat he did a great job at making stu­dents feel they were important. He likes to keep the students’ best interests in mind. One ex­ample is when he chose to cancel classes before Superstorm Sandy even got close to New Jersey. He knew that students, along with the other members of the MU com­munity, had to travel to all differ­ent places to be home with their families. One editor said, “He al­ways put the students first above all else, which is rare to see in a President.”

President Gaffney was sure to make himself visible, whether it was just walking around cam­pus or an athletic event. Many of us at The Outlook remember seeing him at a football game, a basketball game or even a track meet that was three hours away in Maryland. Another editor said he met Gaffney while he was wan­dering around Bey Hall. Gaffney told him that he had just been sit­ting in the back of a random class­room observing.

Any time he passed a student organization having a fundraiser, he was sure to donate what he had in his pocket. Students could find Gaffney absolutely anywhere. A President being so present is not always common when it comes to other schools, but our University was fortunate enough to have this experience.

Read more ...

The Outlook Reflects on Boston Bombing

Boston_Marathon_bombingEvery so often in our lifetime, an unspeakable tragedy strikes and impacts all of our lives in ways we never could have imagined. On Monday, April 15, 2013, several explosions occurred near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Many of us at The Outlook immediately suspected it to be a terrorist attack, but little did we know that the search for the terrorists would put the city of Boston on lockdown for a day while the heroic officers of law en­forcement worked to catch the living suspect.

Although we are all very grate­ful that the suspects were found, we at The Outlook, as well as those around the world can’t help but ask why? Why would anyone want to cause this much harm to innocent people taking part in a wonderful tradition?

It was a horrific sight to watch the videos of the explosion. See­ing people running in fear, crying out in pain and frantically search­ing for loved ones made those of us miles away want to hold our loved ones a little closer than usual. Three lives were claimed by this tragedy, including that of an 8 year-old boy that had just finished congratulating his father on completing the race. Sean Collier, a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol­ogy, also lost his life when he was gunned down late Thursday night by the two bombing suspects.

Read more ...

The Importance of Graduate Assistants

As University students, most of us have come in contact with and formed friendships with the gradu­ate assistants that are employed with the departments or activities that we each choose to participate in as un­dergraduates.

In theory, these graduate students simply work at the University to help facilitate certain tasks and work to­wards their own higher education. However, does a greater purpose for these graduate assistants exist? In the midst of universities and businesses attempting to downsize their costs, how important is it for the University to employ graduate assistants?

According to The Outlook staff, graduate assistants are much more than just a face in the corner typing away at a computer or performing some mundane task. Instead, it is a give-and-take relationship in which the graduate assistant often takes the place of a teacher. Undergraduate students, who are much closer in age to the graduate students than they would be to one of their own pro­fessors, receive insight from people who were in the same position not too long ago.

It is easy to learn from a graduate student who has “been-there-done-that,” who has already entered the “real world,” has walked away from Monmouth University with a diplo­ma, and who can still be a friend and colleague.

Read more ...

Rutgers Proves Money is the Root of Evil in NCAA

By now, most have surely seen the video of former Rutgers’ Men’s Bas­ketball Head Coach Mike Rice and how he would conduct his practices. Rice fired the ball at his players, pushed and shoved them, and yelled homophobic slurs at them.

The Outlook staff is disgusted by what happened. This type of behav­ior is shocking, disgraceful, inappro­priate, ridiculous and has no place in college athletics.

We can’t believe that Rutgers didn’t fire Rice when the tapes were re­viewed in December. The school knew that when this story came out it would reflect poorly on them. So all they did was give Rice a $50,000 fine and a three game sus­pension, without any explanation. In this day and age, the truth always comes out. Schools have to stop trying to sweep these things under the rug and hope they will go away.

Money has to be the explanation for the Rutgers administration refus­ing to take bigger steps. Winning and revenue appears to have taken precedence over sportsmanship and human dignity. These are student athletes, not professionals.

While yes, they are on scholarship and were some of the best basketball players in the country in high school, they are still students. College is a time to learn and grow, and that means in the classroom and on the basketball court. The players aren’t going to be able to learn and grow when they are terrified that their in­structor is going to hit them again.

Read more ...

Is Constant Campus Construction a Positive or Negative?

If anyone has stepped foot onto the campus over the past year, the tall tale signs reading “Please pardon our appearance while we are under construction” signal that campus construction is still whirling in its constant motion. For most students, the pounding of hammers and blocked-off pathways have become about as customary on campus as the historic Wilson Hall. With the constant construction for the past few years, some are left wondering what there really is to improve. Even more importantly is there anything worth further correcting at this time?

Here at The Outlook, we ponder much of the same thing, and with all of us being students, the first thing brought up when the topic is presented is the matter of how will it affect costs and tuition. When The Outlook asked Patti Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services, she assured that every year a separate construction fund is set aside in the overall budget, and that the construction, as most recently shown with the Joan and Robert Rechnitz Hall, is commonly run on donations from outside, nonstudent sources.

Although that adds a bit of security, some of us still remain a bit nervous about the possibility of spending beyond the budgeted means. All of which lead to the scare of tuition hikes, leaving some to say that the money should be withdrawn from other areas of the University in order to finish the construction.

Read more ...

A New Hawk Joins the Nest

With the announcement of Pres­ident Paul Gaffney II’s retirement last year, we knew it was only a matter of time before the Univer­sity named its next president. That decision finally came on March 13, when the University named Lehigh’s current Dean of the Col­lege of Business and Economics, Dr. Paul R. Brown.

Up until this point, the only knowledge The Outlook had of Brown was based on his interac­tion with students when he visited in February. After the hiring, we were able to talk with him at great length and learn even more about him.

Our first impres­sion of him is that he is a good guy with good ambitions, but we still have a lot to learn about him.

So far, we learned that he would like to see the campus become more diverse, its space expanded, and for the school to continue to have growth in its educational programs.

All of these things sound great and would be very good improve­ments to campus. However, when we asked him what he would elim­inate he said that nothing came to mind. The Outlook would love to see him eliminate one prob­lem that has been prevalent at the University in recent years. This problem is of course the parking situation.

When he arrives, we recom­mend that he try finding a park­ing space in one of the commuter parking lots around 1:00 pm. It should make for an eye opening experience.

Read more ...

Has Spring Break Calmed Down Since the Early 2000s?

Legend has it that when spring break happens, everyone gets wild and crazy. We’re supposed to travel to exotic locales with beaches and a lower legal drinking age. We’re sup­posed to spend the nights out on the town and spend our days sleeping off hangovers. That’s what MTV taught us.

The weird thing is, for most of us, spring break involves more sweat­pants than it does wet t-shirt con­tests. We’ve strayed away from the stereotypical MTV spring break for something more relaxed.

Spring break is in the middle of the semester, meaning our responsibili­ties don’t just go away. Many stu­dents have jobs that don’t follow the University’s schedule. Plenty of professors assign papers to do over break. Even when papers aren’t assigned, there is still a great deal of reading to do because professors know that we have a week off. Who has time to do keg stands when there are three papers due the week we get back?

Relaxation is what spring break is about for most of The Outlook staff. Midterms will finally be over and we can relax. Will we be sleeping in? Definitely. Wearing sweatpants? Yes, please. Watching “Boy Meets World” marathons? Absolutely. That isn’t to say that we’re all homebodies. Some of us will definitely be going out, but we’ll be going to local hang­outs to catch up with friends from our hometowns.

Read more ...

Think Outside Your Major

“Get involved;” next to “you’re late,” those are arguably the two most common words for a student to hear on a college campus. We spend much of our high school career being told to get involved in order to spice up our college applications and then, once in college, we’re further told to get involved to spice up our job résumé.

We believe most students by their second year or so, can finally understand the vast importance of getting involved. But is getting involved in your own department enough? After all, we’re all Monmouth students, regardless of major.

The Communication Department offers seven different platforms for students to get involved with. All of these organizations are student-run and give students an opportunity to get hands on experience in their field before stepping foot into the dreaded ‘real world.’

Of course, the Communication Department isn’t the only department which offers hands on experience. In fact, you’d be hard-pressed to find a major that doesn’t have a coinciding club, organization or extra-curricular aspect to get involved with.

Here at The Outlook, we acknowledge all the hard work our fellow students put into their fields and the passion shown for respective clubs and organizations. Bringing the news to this campus each week has pushed most of us to step outside of this sanctuary we call Plangere and take a look at what other departments are doing.

Read more ...

What Does the Football Team’s Move to the Big South Mean?

Two weeks ago, the University football team split with 16 year affiliate, the Northeast Confer­ence. Now, they will head to the Big South. Overall, The Outlook is happy that the football team will now be accepted into the Big South Conference but the switch raises certain questions amongst the staff.

Although there is currently no concrete evidence to support it, The Outlook is con­cerned that the move to the Big South Conference will jeopardize the price of tuition. It is to our knowl­edge that the Big South Conference is composed of seven teams including MU. This means we would play three away games in the conference located in North Carolina, South Caro­lina, or Virginia. Geographically, the schools in the Big South Con­ference are a farther distance than the schools in the Northeast Con­ference are. It’s possible that the football team will be traveling a farther distance for an away game than they have in the past. The Outlook wonders how the Univer­sity will cover the cost of travel for away games.

Currently, the University‘s football team roster has nearly 100 student athletes. The cost to either fly or drive all of these ath­letes, as well as the coaches and other staff members, could total a large amount of money. Whether it is by plane or bus, the financial situation will be an impending is­sue.

Another factor to keep in mind when counting the numbers will be lodging. How will the Univer­sity afford lodging for all those affiliated with the football team? The Outlook a lso w onders i f t he move to The Big South will cause the University to offer more ath­letic scholarships. And if so, we are curious as to where this mon­ey will come from. We believe that we will not be able to tell how the move to the Big South Confer­ence will impact the University financially until the fall of 2014.

Read more ...

A Challenge For More Faculty to Participate in The Outlook

Every week, students from a vari­ety of majors attempt to come up with story ideas, mold them into topics of interest and finally collect comments from professionals as expert sources. On top of other commitments includ­ing homework, other clubs and em­ployment, these students regularly get it done.

One of the most frustrating things for a writer is being ignored when asking a professor or staff member of the University for a comment or an interview. Here at The Outlook, we understand a busy schedule as well as anyone, but is it really that hard to email the writer back either stating you are not the best source for com­ment (It is always appreciated when someone suggests who would be.) or that you do not have the time to share your thoughts?

The Outlook does not reach out to faculty and staff members haphaz­ardly. Our writers take time to look at course selections and professor profile pages to find the best sources to par­ticipate in our articles.

One might feel it is, actually, an obligation of staff members, profes­sors in particular, to share their schol­arly knowledge with the University community and the paper. Our job as journalists is to publish facts and opinions surrounding situations and concerns that are important to our readers.

Read more ...

And They Say That A HERO Could Save Us

Every year since 2007, the Uni­versity has held its Designated HERO of the Year Award Ceremo­ny, a national movement to prevent drunk driving accidents that came as a result of the death of Ensign Elliott, a May 2000 graduate of the United States Naval Academy who was killed in a head-on collision with a drunken driver on July 22, 2000.

In this ceremony, students nomi­nate themselves or someone they know and the HERO Cam­paign Group at the University chooses a win­ner. The purpose of this ceremony is to prevent tragedies that come as a result of drunk driving by awarding the usage of sober designated driv­ers.

However, is this definition of a “hero” one that is universal to those outside of a university com­munity? According to some of The Outlook staff, the meaning of a “hero” as being someone who serves as a designated driver is one that belongs to the University but could also be considered a stretch for the world at large.

To many college students, a “hero” is someone who saves girls from waiting in the cold in the Cedar parking lot as they wait for their cabs or volunteers to “take one for the team” by being the designated driver. They step up in times of need, sometimes sacrific­ing their own fun, to ensure that their friends get home safely. Rare­ly are they thanked or recognized.

Read more ...

More Rooms For Residents, Less Parking for Commuters

As students, there are many things we have to deal with. Some primarily face the battle of getting work submitted on time, while others adapt to lifestyle changes the most and must bear the harsh reality of becoming an adult. However, one issue that all of us are familiar with is whether it is better to be a resident or a commuter. The University has obviously made that decision for us by choosing to build a new dorm in Parking Lot Six near the library.

Current residents may not care about this, but it does affect all of us. After all, who among us doesn’t at least have a friend who has said, “I’m late to class because I can’t park!” Beginning this spring, we’ll have 200 less parking spaces. In return, the University promises to have more bedrooms some time during 2014.

Several editors pointed out that it might be a very serious problem for students looking to use the library late at night. If library parking is deferred to the Woods Theater lot, then, if students are at the library late at night, it could be a daunting experience to walk that distance at that hour.

Moreover, this could cause serious overcrowding of the Woods Theater lot during the day, meaning students who have class in there may have to park far away and race across the entire campus.

In addition to Lot Six being one of the few commuter lots on the north end of campus, students have been complaining almost non-stop throughout the entire semester about a lack of parking during certain times. Despite the valet parking service, many students find themselves consistently running late, due to the inability to find places to park. One editor points out that if it weren’t for being an honors student and thus having the ability to park in the honors lot, he might have needed to rearrange his schedule.

Read more ...

Hurricane Sandy Causes Professors to Revamp Finals

Since the closing of the University due to Hurricane Sandy, students have been running around like well-educated chickens with their heads cut off to figure out what assignments are due and how to catch up on over a week’s worth of course work. To further add to the disorganization of the revised syllabi and new due dates, students now have to deal with a change in the schedule for finals week.

President Gaffney sent a campus-wide email saying faculty members must schedule exams or examlike exercises before the semester ends on December 21. He also said that if take home final exams are used classes still must be held during the final examination week. This last week thereby meets the 15 week federal requirement.

The opinion of most of The Outlook editors is that the course work they were given at the beginning of the semester is not going to change. Very few professors altered the content of their syllabi due to the storm. Most due dates were adjusted accordingly, but most likely there will still be as many exams as there would have been without the storm.

Overall, the amount of work has not changed, but some students are confused as to what they have to do for their individual classes. Students are used to basing whether or not they have to go to class the last week of the semester on the exams they have to take. This year, both students and faculty members will have to adjust accordingly in order to be prepared for finals week.

Read more ...

Hawks Mend A Broken Wing

It has now been two weeks since Hurricane Sandy made her way through the tri-state area, leaving nothing but a trail of destruction in her path.

The high winds caused trees to fall and power to go out while the ocean surged and made its way onto land.

A week and a half of classes and many other campus happenings, were cancelled due to the storm, including two issues of the weekly Outlook. In this time, many Jersey shore communities were changed forever. Never before has a storm of Sandy’s magnitude shaken the foundation of so many different towns.

 The Long Branch boardwalk and Pier Village was greatly damaged, parts of the Seaside Heights boardwalk are now in the Atlantic Ocean, huge trees fell, and the ocean met the bay down in Long Beach Island.

There are students and faculty members whose lives were directly affected by this storm. Some may not even be back to classes for a while depending on their situation.

In these hard times, it is important that we all remember one message, a message President Gaffney constantly passes on to the students; take care of each other.

While students were gone, the University served its community the best way it could. The MAC was offered as a shelter and it went on to be the biggest shelter in the area. Now that we are all back on campus, it’s time that we do our best to serve and look after everyone involved in the campus community.

Read more ...

When it Comes to Midterm Grades, Some Professors Fail

Remember the days before college when you had to worry about report cards being sent to your house? You would get home everyday, a nervous wreck, wondering if your parents knew about the D you had in geometry. Well, those days are long gone. The only updates we get nowadays are the midterm grades halfway into the semester.

The Outlook staff thinks that midterm grades are for the most part, pointless. Some professors don’t have enough grades to give you a real idea of how you are doing in the class.

If you only have one or two grades so far in the semester, what does the midterm grade really mean? It just tells you how you did on your first exam and a paper. If the class only has one grade, does the result of a single multiple-choice test really explain how you are grasping the material?

 Midterm grades also don’t factor in attendance and participation. If you are the type of person who attends all of your classes and actively raises your hand, your final grade is going to be a lot higher than the letter you receive from WebAdvisor.

Many professors downplay the importance of these grades we receive in the middle of the semester. Some give lower grades to keep the students working hard, while others tell their students that the grade is meaningless. Other instructors have said that showing improvement throughout the semester could change the weight of our grades, having things later in the semester become more significant than originally planned. If our instructors see the grades as a joke, why shouldn’t we?

Read more ...

A Fall Break From Classes...Not Campus

The days leading up to fall break are supposed to be a time for some last minute studying for midterms or finishing papers so that no work has to be done over break. Unfortunately, too many students find themselves stressing over getting everything packed in time, how they are going to get home, and accommodations they may need if they are unable to get home.

In some cases, students also find themselves worrying about how to move out at the end of the semester while still getting to their exams on time.

Under Monmouth’s current policy, students are required to vacate campus at a certain time regardless of whether or not they have class or exams, and this tends to put pressure on a lot of students. Although the university does give students the option of requesting longer stay, the required paperwork is an unnecessary hassle.

The Outlook staff suggests that students be given at least two days after all exams end to move their things out at the end of the semester. During fall break, students should have the option of staying on campus without filling out forms. Mandating students to go home for fall break is unnecessary and inconvenient in some cases. Everyone has a different work load, schedule, and priority demand. Therefore, more flexibility should be allotted to students in regards to if or when they must leave campus.

Read more ...

Keep Calm and Stick Around

If you were to go the University’s main page, glide your mouse pointer over to the campus life tab and scroll on down about three quarters of the way, you would come across something called the Student Activities Calendar. This well-put-together PDF file contains enough information to keep you busy every weekend from week one of the semester all the way up into the final week of class December.

But despite the numerous events planned out for the student body, why does it still seem that majority of students go home once Friday rolls around?

A suitcase school is a term used to describe a college or university at which students frequently travel home on weekends, creating a lack of involvement and a “ghost town” like environment. Does this sound like Monmouth?

The Student Activities Board and Student Government Association are constantly organizing events around campus, but if you’ve ever gone to these events you’d notice a small turnout and an overall lack of involvement. Who is to blame for this?

More often than not, we hear students quote the famous excuse, “Well I had no idea that was going on, I would have gone if I knew.” To that there is really only one response: read your email! SAB puts up flyers around campus for events all the time, as well as e-mailing students of upcoming events for the week. How else does one expect to find out about campus events? What more effective means is there of reaching the students? Do they expect a knock on their door in their dorm and a personal escort? We, the students have to make the effort.

Read more ...

Every Vote Counts...Even Ones by College Students

The Presidential Election taking place in November of 2012 is the result of events that happened almost 225 years ago. Countries around the world fight for the right to vote. This is a right, The Outlook staff, believes is taken for granted by the college student community.

Most of staff believes that voting is something every eligible person should participate in. The staff believes college students are the next generation to enter the work force and should vote for who will do the best job so that all of us have jobs once our education at the University is completed.

This election even affects some of us now. Students should be paying attention to the people who decide how much money we can have for school. College kids can absolutely affect this election, but probably not more so than any other specific group.

Candidates can get college kids attention by talking more about issues that affect us more immediately, like student loan reforms. A major issue over the summer was student loan interest rates and this problem was eventually resolved but what will stop it from coming up again. Student issues will continue to be ignored if students do not get out and vote.

Read more ...

If I Could Just Find A Parking Spot...

Finding parking in the non-residential parking lots 13, 14 and 18 and lot 25 can be hard on a weekday, but so far this year the added parking valets have caused more chaos than years before.

The valets have increased traffic in the parking lots. Many of us have been commuters for several years, and believe that the parking has never been this much of a hassle, especially at early class times.

After 8:30 am classes, finding a parking spot is close to impossible. An editor said he had difficulty trying to find a space for a 10:00 am class, while in past years it was never an issue. Parking should not be filled that early in the day considering classes run from 8:30 am to 10:05 pm.

One of the editors explains that she had to drive around for 20 minutes just to find a spot. She is not the first person who had to waste that much time trying to find a place to park. Another editor said that she specifically left extra early before class to find a parking spot but still found herself driving around the lot for a longer period of time.

However, there are faculty members who also park in non-residential lots and they too have experienced difficulty parking. Robert Scott, a Communications Professor had his keys locked in his car due to a parking valet.

Read more ...

Challenge Accepted

As the days are getting shorter, the weather getting cooler, and the leaves beginning to change, a new academic year is upon us. With the start of the new semester comes the promise of a fresh start and new challenges.

General George S. Patton once said “Accept the challenges so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory.” It is this feeling of success and accomplishment that we all try to reach.

Challenges are faced by everyone--from a first year student all the way to the University’s administration.

Each year, the University challenges itself to be the best university it can be. Whether it’s making meal swipes available in more buildings for students or completely remodeling academic buildings, the administration is always striving to be better.

This year is going to be President Gaffney’s last as president of the University, and now the administration has the challenge of finding a replacement to fill the big shoes he is going to leave behind.

The class of 2012 has to overcome the challenge of succeeding in their respective fields and beginning the next chapter of their lives, as the class of 2013 most likely does not want this current chapter to end.

I know I’m not ready for college to end, so instead I’ll embrace the tests and challenges that will come my way in my senior year.

Read more ...

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu