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Editorial

Volume 85 (Fall 2013 - Spring 2014)

Not All Change is Bad

Change is hard. Sometimes it's scary and uncomfortable and other times it's exciting and new. Here at The Outlook, we undergo such changes every May when we're expected to transition from freshmen to sophomores, juniors to seniors, or seniors to full-time, working adults. The thought of moving on after getting comfortable in the positions we've occupied for two semesters is unsettling. No matter what we are planning to do when finals week is over, the uncertainty of those future experiences is what makes us nervous or excited to move on.

Many editors will be graduating this May, leaving the world of Monmouth altogether. Though most have grown and matured during their four years here, some editors still feel unprepared to enter the real world. We have been sheltered at the University to an extent, depending on professors, faculty and email reminders to get us through our college careers. Now, graduating seniors are tasked with managing themselves and their responsibilities without the guidance of their professors.

"I feel like Monmouth has kept me in a little bubble for four years and I don't want to leave that bubble, ever," said one editor. "Monmouth Hawks fly together so why must I fly away?"

The hardest part to take in for a lot of seniors is that they will not be returning to school in the fall. School is all we have ever known since kindergarten. To suddenly stop going is somewhat of a shellshock.

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A Love Letter to the University

Oh MU, let us count the ways that we absolutely love you. Each week The Outlook staff picks a topic we like to discuss for the editorial. The topic is usually something we would like to see changed or something we do not necessarily agree with.

For this issue, we decided to talk about what we love at the University. We like to give credit when credit is due. With this being said, the editors were asked to pick one thing we adored about the University. This is what we came up with.

1. Getting involved in departments outside of your major

Not every school would encourage students with specific majors to leave their department and branch out. The University wants us to discover what we like outside of our studies. There are several editors at The Outlook that are not communication majors and if they weren't able to branch out, the newspaper staff would be a lot less diverse.

2. The professors

The professors at the University are just so passionate about their field of study that it makes each class enjoyable. They even find time to attend events outside of class time which proves this even more. It also shows that students really do not have an excuse for not getting involved outside of the classroom. The professors' overall experience in their specific field is also admirable. Students know that they are learning skills from actual professionals, not just a person with a degree.

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MU Helps Leaders Look Forward

The University makes many events available to students throughout the year. From concerts to charity fundraisers, guest speakers and recreational activities, there is always something going on. Although many of us attend these functions, we usually do not see what goes on behind the scenes. From booking a room to ordering food, everything must be strategically planned to ensure a successful event. It is obvious that there are many steps needed to be taken in order to pull off a successful gathering. Naturally, the process can be tedious and demanding.

The University requires members of campus organizations to attend leadership conferences during the fall and the spring semesters. These conferences consist of a series of workshops that range from topics like "Grades Are Not Enough," "Group Development" and even event planning. These workshops seek to aid students in becoming more prepared to run clubs and organizations.

Megan McGowan, the assistant director of Student Activities and the Student Center said, "The leadership workshops are geared toward successful club operations."

Each club is required to have two different members attend at least three workshops in order to receive full credit for their club. The individuals who attend do not have to be E-board members; this allows responsibility of attendance to be spread throughout the entire organization. If organizations fail to complete the workshops, there are consequences such as loss of privileges and recognition on campus.

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Outlook Regrets Mistake

The Outlook prides itself on being truthful and fair. Unfortunately in our editorial last week titled "California Dreaming," we were neither of those. In that editorial, we discussed a home in CA that was generously donated to the University and presented thoughts on what the administration might do with that property.

After we published the piece, The Outlook became aware that the home was sold well over a year ago. We were also told that it was located in a gated, desert community that did not allow for occupancy of anyone under 55 years-old.

The Outlook was irresponsible for reporting this information without fully checking the facts. We regret this entirely and apologize if in any way we misled readers or caused anyone at the University distress.

We hope that the public's opinion of the newspaper is not solely based on our missteps and rather takes into account how rare moments like this are. We can assure everyone at the University that no one feels worse about this than the staff in the newsroom.

California Dreaming

When coming to Monmouth it is the common expectation that learning is going to take place. No surprise there. Yet hawks of all years and majors are often surprised to learn that the University owns one house in CA.

As the often unheard story goes the CA house was left to the University in an alumna's will after they had passed, and that's pretty much it. Since the University obtained the house some years back they have been sitting on it, not really knowing how to make use of it.

Well, The Outlook editorial staff has a few ideas and recommendations as to what the University could do with the West Coast property. While there were several ideas tossed around, one suggestion that the majority agreed upon was that the property could serve as a good place for students to travel to during the semester, like the semester at Washington D.C. program offered to students.

As one of the editors pointed out, a great advantage that this option brings is that it could be a very good resume addition for students. Even better, the experience could make the students more marketable when they go in search for a job. Another editor hypothesized that the successful effects seen in the Washington program could suggest similar achievements in CA. "Using the Washington center as an example of how important it is to have students get housing and internships out of state, there is a high success rate of students getting a job out of the program," the editor said.

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Is This on the Syllabus?

If NYC were to come to life and take the form of a human, it would be a college student. From sunrise to sunset, college students are constantly engaged in some sort of activity. Whether you're cramming for tomorrow's Advanced Abstract Algebra quiz, or listening to the sweet sounds of your unfinished chapter readings serenading you, just like city nightlife, there is always something else to do.

When a student registers for a class and is handed their syllabus, it acts as a binding contract between the student and professor. As students, we schedule internships, extracurricular activities and work around the course schedule given to us by our professors. When a professor spontaneously decides to make it mandatory for a student to attend an event outside of class, it dishevels the student's schedule and puts the student at a disadvantage if they are unable to attend an event due to a prior commitment.

The Outlook believes that students should not be required to attend events outside of scheduled class meeting times because the events tend to conflict with prior engagements. We feel that it is unnecessary for professors to force students to attend events on campus causing students to skip a class, leave early or cancel other obligations just to attend this event and not get penalized.

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Construction to be Completed by __(fill in the blank)__

Throughout the past four years, the University has gone through great lengths to expand its buildings in quantity and quality. The Outlook staff believes that the additions to campus will definitely build the integrity of the University, but that comes with a large price.

Whether you are a a science, communication or business major, there is one common nuisance in your life: the parking situation at the University.

Due to the massive amount of building projects the University has decided to forgo, the students have been forced to handle the situation in an unfavorable way.

The Outlook staff noticed a shortage in parking when the University decided turn Lot 6 into a dorm building for freshmen. While The Outlook staff understands that this dorm is necessary to accommodate incoming students, it is difficult to understand why the University must build so much all at once.

The Outlook noticed another obstacle in the commuter parking lot upon returning from winter break. With the new addition to Bey Hall, many commuter parking spaces are unable to be used.

One editor noted, "Pretty soon, the University will run out of room to build. If they keep adding buildings, there's not going to be any parking spots left."

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The Benefits of General Education Courses

At the start of every new school year, eager college freshman say goodbye to their parents and enter their new unfamiliar, uncharted territory that is college. Within the walls of their new dormitory rooms, a sense of freedom seems to creep up their nostrils and empower these freshmen to discover who they truly are deep at the roots, reveal these identities, and bring to light this new person that is ready to bloom.

The reality of finally being able to take classes that strictly pertain to their desired area of study are here. These freshmen are ready to embark on their four-year journey and immediately dive head-first into classes for their major. Or so they think.

Why is it that colleges require students to continue to enroll in general education classes that students have already touched upon in the past years of education, instead of diving head first into their field of study?

The Outlook believes general education classes are required and necessary for a college degree because they give you a well-rounded education and the opportunity to explore topics at a much deeper level than one thought. The material that you crack open again in college, and look at from a completely different scholarly perspective, will shape you into a versatile individual that has a wide array of knowledge on various topics.

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Graduation Wasn’t Always at PNC ...

Graduation is a bittersweet time of year. The college journey comes to an end but the future lies ahead for thousands of graduating students after every semester. For University students, commencement means gathering at PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel for the celebratory ceremony, yet, it wasn't always that way.

Prior to the move to PNC about 10 years ago, graduation was held on the Great Lawn where the soccer field is now. Faculty lined the walkways near classroom buildings as students said their final goodbyes. According to faculty members who attended the on-campus ceremony, it was a personal and sentimental experience. It also allowed guests to enjoy the scenic landscape the University has to offer. However, after inclement weather left people drenched, the University decided to move the ceremony to PNC, where it has remained to this day.

The Outlook editorial staff discussed what it would be like to bring graduation back to campus. Most agreed that the ceremony would be more practical and functional if it remained at PNC.

Editors recognized that there are many problems with having the ceremony on campus grounds. Amount of tickets, weather and comfort were factors that led most toward PNC. Overall, when all elements were put into consideration, the staff decided PNC would be the better option.

One editor said, "PNC just makes more sense, unfortunately. I wish we could have [graduation] on campus, but I know people who are still trying to get more tickets to graduation at PNC. I'd rather not have to tell my grandmother that she can't come because it's raining."

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Are All Textbooks Actually Required?

Buying and renting textbooks at the beginning of each semester is perhaps one of the most stressful and tedious aspects of college life. Before classes start, students are able to log on to their WebAdvisor account to view the list of books needed for each course and whether or not they are required or only recommended by the professor.

While The Outlook staff understands the educational value of text books, most feel that they are unnecessary.

Because the University encourages both students and faculty to utilize the various online outlets that are provided such as eCampus, where professors have the ability to upload assigned readings, The Outlook feels as though it would be a lot easier and cheaper if professors just posted all of their readings online. In fact, one editor expressed that the college textbook is irrelevant because of all of the web-based tools that exist today.

The University library also provides online databases such as Ebsco Host that make scholarly articles, journals and other publications available to students and faculty free of charge. Some of The Outlook staff believes that professors can find the same or similar information in these databases as they can in expensive textbooks.

Other editors explained that it is not the purchasing of textbooks that is troublesome; it is the amount of times the textbook is actually put to use. "I don't want to carry around 20 pounds of dead paper weight all semester," said one editor. "If we're going to use the book more than a few times then it might be worth it."

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There’s Snow Way You’re Missing Class

Spring semester seems to almost be a contradiction as we continue to be bombarded by a new snowstorm each week. It seems as though since the semester started we cannot go a week without looking out the window to watch the roads get covered in a new fresh layer of snow. While the ground ices over, students and faculty alike await to hear of the University closings and class cancellations that are delayed or never come. With a University student ratio of 50 percent on campus and 50 percent commuter, according to Vaughn Clay, here at the Outlook we believe these absent or late closings to be very dangerous.

Snowy school days for the 50 percent of students living on campus provide their own sets of issues. Even though our campus is fairly small, the residents at the University still have to make their way to the educational buildings.

An editor who lives on campus said, "It's so dangerous. I live on campus so I don't have to worry about the roads or anything but the walkways are never salted or shoveled properly and I always get nervous walking through the underpass because it gets really slippery."

For the 30 percent of students who live in off-campus housing there is always the danger of driving on the roads. A lot of students in the area live on back roads in various towns close to the University. These back roads are not always plowed and tend to freeze over into ice. It can take a few days for the different communities to salt or plow the roads that students live on, making it difficult for them to get to campus.

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Eenie Meenie Minor Mo?

For many students, a college degree implies that a person graduated with a major and plans to pursue a career in that respective field. On the other hand, The Outlook believes that a minor is a very valuable asset for a college student and encourages students to pursue one.

While the pursuit of a degree can be a difficult path, the University also leaves extra credits avaliable for students to elective courses. If you have the extra credits to be spent, why not focus it on a minor and put those credits to good use? Even if you have five open electives, that is enough to fulfill some minors offered by the University.

The Outlook thinks a minor can improve skill sets so greatly that a college student or recent graduate may be a step ahead of their competition, especially if it is complementary to their major. An example of this would be pairing a degree such as journalism/public relations with a creative writing minor. Since both concentrations require a substantial amount of writing, having a creative writing minor furthers the skills that this particular student has already been acquiring. Some editors believe that this tactic can be used in many different schools of study.

Another example would be pairing a criminal justive major with a political science minor. As a criminal justice major, a student is required to know an extensive amount about the judicial branch of government. A political science minor would increase the student's knowledge about the three branches of government by now becoming involved in the legislative branch.

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Study Time Cut Short

How can the students who study in the Murry and Leonie Guggenheim Memorial Library get their work done when library hours are not the most accessible? We, as students, all have different studying habits; some can study in loud environments undisturbed, while others need the quietness of the library in order to keep their focus. Some Outlook editors like listening to music when studying while others need silence.

We acknowledge that the library extended its hours for finals, and we are thankful to the library staff for putting in the extra effort to make these accommodations for the students. The library hours during finals are as follows: Monday through Thursday 8 am - 2 am, Friday 8 am - 1 am, Saturday 9 am - midnight, Sunday 11 am - 2 am.

The standard library hours are Monday through Thursday 8 am - midnight, Friday 8 am - 6 pm, Saturday 9 am - 5 pm and Sunday noon - midnight. We find that these hours clash with our already very busy schedules. Because of this, even early morning hours can be seen as a hassle to go to the library. At The Outlook we all agree that Friday and weekend hours need to be changed, by being extended another hour, at least.

Having the library close at 6 pm on Friday night is an inconvenience. Not everyone has the option to start the weekend early and some students like to study late at night or dedicate the weekend to their studies.

One editor said, "Fridays and Saturdays are homework nights for me. Closing so early on weekends makes me feel like such a loser for even trying to do my work then."

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Valuable Experience for a Price

Experiential education is a requirement for many majors at the University. For those students who have not studied abroad, this means working at an internship. In order for an internship to count toward the experiential education requirement on our academic audits, we have to pay for a three credit class involving proof of 120 internship hours and a final paper. However, if internships are generally unpaid work, how are we supposed to afford the cost of over $2,000 for a three credit class?

Many of the editors at The Outlook struggle with finding time to complete their internship hours while still making some kind of income. Working 120 hours at an unpaid job over a 15-week semester grants students far less time to work at a regular, paying job. Not only are we not generating income, but we're losing money due to the hefty price of college credits and travel expenses to and from our internship sites.

As for the class, some of the editors cannot understand what their tuition dollars are paying for. The course relies heavily on the hours spent at the internship sites. Some editors who have taken the class said that their class only met a few times during the semester, they do not use campus resources, and the only contact they kept with their professors was checking in via email.

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Black ... Thursday?

Thanksgiving Day celebrations should be about catching up with family members and friends who have traveled long distances for the special occasion, stuffing your faces with trays upon trays of food and lounging around watching football. The holiday should not be celebrated by standing in hour-long lines, fighting the bitter, ruthless blasts of cold wind, and racing for the last 40-inch plasma screen TV that is discounted at 50 percent off at your local Best Buy.

This holiday, stores like Kmart are turning Black Friday into "Black Thursday" with sales starting as early as 6 am on Thanksgiving Day. Kmart is allowing its customers to shop for 41 hours straight starting Thursday morning until 11 pm the next day. Kmart and other stores such as Sears, which are open from 8 pm on Thursday until 10 pm on Friday, are providing customers with the urge to ditch family members and friends just to go on a hectic shopping spree before the turkey is even out of the oven.

According to an article published in the Huffington Post on Nov. 12, Kmart has been open on Thanksgiving Day for 22 years and has been offering their regular and seasonal associates holiday pay; however, this is the first year that Kmart is not closing for a few hours before reopening for Black Friday.

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“Show me the Money!”

When does volunteer work turn into paid work? When is it morally correct to not pay someone who donates more hours a week to their student run organization than their actual paid job? The Outlook staff believes that serving as an e-board member for any media run student organization acts as a full time-job and should be paid like a full time-job.

The Outlook staff calculated that if we were to compare the amount of hours at our respective paid positions to the amount of hours we spend at The Outlook, our work would never be finished in time for the Tuesday night deadline.

It would seem appropriate if media student-run organizations would be paid minimum wage, but we do not think it would be proper to pay those who do not hold an e-board position.

If e-board members are not permitted to be paid the $7.25 per hour rate, than why doesn't being an e-board member count as an internship?

This idea is not as far-fetched as it may seem. In fact, other well known universities, such as Northwestern in IL, offer internship programs to their editors on their student-run newspaper.

While we understand that The Outlook, as well as other student-run media organizations give us credible work we can use in the future, we feel that our organization's work requires commitment that has not yet been acknowledged by the University.

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Hiding Behind the Wall of Technology

With the rise in technological use over the years, the way that we communicate has been altered. There is now a new form of communication among people, which has moved us away from face-to-face communication, and towards the new technology revolution. In addition to face-to-face communication, we are now able to speak to one another using text messages, emails and instant messaging, among many other forms of technologically advanced communication.

This new additional form of conversation can be both beneficial and detrimental to society in a number of ways. One downside is that some people have the ability to hide behind technology when communicating with others.

At one time or another, we have all done it. We have used technology to confront an issue or talk about a topic in an attempt to avoid the face-to-face awkwardness or fear.

Communication through technology creates a new form of confidence for people, allowing them to say things that they normally would never have the guts to say in person. The Outlook editors believe in many cases, this new-found confidence is not always a good thing. "If you cannot be a man, and yes this goes for women as well, and say it to my face, then don't say it at all," said one Outlook editor.

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“A” for Effort

Midterms are a very stressful time for college students. Between the normal hustle and bustle college life of balancing course work, internships, work, and extra-curricular activities, midterms apply that extra ounce of pressure that is just enough to really stress us out. However, the stress could be eased a bit if a student knows where they stand during midterms by having their grades available to them.

The easiest way to see where you stand in the class and having one place to reference your grades during the semester. That is why The Outlook staff would like to take the time to discuss why we feel it is important for professor's to give students their grades and academic feedback.

Most students feel more stress around midterms if they are unsure where they stand in their classes. This could be easily fixed through more academic feedback from professors, whether it be promptly returning papers and assignments or giving a layout for students to figure out their grades. Whether grades be handed back on paper, or through emails, it is always helpful for students to measure their success in their studying techniques and to learn from their mistakes on exams or in papers if they are given feedback quickly.

If professors give feedback to their students they can have a better understanding of what their professors are looking for in their work. It is important to understand a professor's grading style, so that students can improve their work to adjust for the class.

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Fall Break or Study Break?

Many students are still recovering from the misconception of fall break. While the term "break" implies a respite for students to go home and relax, most of The Outlook staff spent their two days of no classes writing papers and studying for midterms, which professors were required to submit by Tuesday, Oct. 22.

According to Dr. Franca Mancini, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services, fall break is scheduled in the academic calendar to give students a chance to physically and mentally recover from any stress caused by academics, extra-curricular activities or being away from home.

This stress is highest for college students at this time of year. Mancini said, "It is true, also, that requests for services tend to increase during this time of year, and we see another spike right after mid-terms, when students realistically assess where they stand in their classes. Overall, on our campus and nationwide, the number of students requesting mental health services is between 9 to 11 percent. Monmouth is no different."

The Outlook staff believes that having midterms the week following fall break was much more work than we were equipped to handle. We understand that professors have deadlines to meet as well, but some of the editors think that due dates for papers and exams could have been spread out so we had more time to prepare. While those few hours we spent in class on Thursday and Friday were now ours to spend, however, other obligations, such as work or internships did not offer us breaks.

One editor points out that fall break could just as well have been called reading days for midterms, like the University gives us before finals. Calling those two days a "break" deceived some of The Outlook staff into believing we had time to relax. Meanwhile, the homework piled up and we were faced with even more worries the following Monday than we had when we left campus.

Time management should not be a concern if the time we are given is supposed to be for relaxing, spending time with family and avoiding anything that may cause us to worry. However, if we do not manage our time wisely, we end up buried in assignments upon our return to the University.

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Breast Cancer Awareness Overload?

It is about halfway through the month of October and everyone has come to the realization that the color pink is everywhere.

As most of America can conclude, October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. With a whole month dedicated to this type of cancer, it seems that everyone from Dunkin' Donuts to the NFL is in support of this cause.

Many believe that this month dedicated to awareness, has spiraled out of control and is a bit to the extreme. It seems that a month of trying to bring attention to this illness and raise money for the cause started off with good intentions but has been taken out of context and could sometimes be used as a business ploy.

The Outlook feels strongly about bringing awareness to the very serious issue of cancer. October is filled with breast cancer walks, fundraisers and wonderful events to try to find a cure for this horrific disease.

The Outlook recognizes how incredible it is that the public comes together for a month to support breast cancer; however, there are various other types of cancers that may not be as treatable as Breast Cancer and should be recognized and brought forward.

Collectively, The Outlook knows that people suffer from other cancers as well, but those forms of cancer do not receive the large amount of attention that Breast Cancer does. Another dangerous and most often terminal disease is heart disease, but it does not gain nearly the same coverage as breast cancer.

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Student Involvement? Not So Much.

Multiple clubs and organization make great efforts at hosting events on campus, but The Outlook staff believes that improvement on student attendance can be made.

We believe that one possibility can be whether the events offered on-campus are of student interest or not. This is still up for debate amongst the staff, yet we do give organizations and clubs like the Student Activities Board (SAB) credit for the way they advertise their events and push for student involvement. Email is usually the common form of how clubs and organizations reach out to students,. However, the vast majority of the student body deletes these invitations upon receiving them.

While there are certain events that occur on campus which have hosted a larger amount of students, these events usually only obtain such an audience when there is an obligation for a class or a chance for extra credit. While The Outlook staff does notice that Monmouth has a record of hosting events with large student turnouts that aren't a part of an academic commitment, like the Involvement Fair or the Fall Carnival. However most of the other events fall under the wayside with less than a couple dozen students attending.

Commuters in particular find it difficult at times to attend events on campus in their free time. Since the majority of the University's student body is made up of commuter students, we feel that events must be more commuter-friendly. With events that clash with work, class and other obligations, events on campus appear to be aimed at the small population of students already living on campus.

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Student Center Offers New Cuisine Options

Once again, the Rebecca Stafford Student Center has attempted to make changes to its dining services in hopes for more pleasurable feedback from those who visit the area. The Student Center now offers a few new options, along with a new look, and although these changes are a step in the right direction, there will always be room for improvement.

This year the Student Center brought Jersey Mike’s and Greens to Go as a few new stations to offer to the students and professional staff. While some people really enjoy these food choices, many find problems with certain aspects of the changes.

The Outlook staff favors the new station, Greens to Go because of the variety of options offered in the ‘Build it for you’ salads. In addition, the staff enjoys Jersey Mikes overall but is conscious when making a decision to buy a sub from there based on its high pricing.

One editor said, “We don’t need big name companies like Jersey Mike’s, just affordable, good food.”

Another mentioned, “...[ARAMARK] should have kept the Panini station and gotten rid of adding Jersey Mike’s because it’s overpriced.”

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iPhone Software Update iOS7: Loading...........

Three letters and one number are everywhere right now: iOS7. Oh yes, Apple released a new upgrade which has seems to have shaken our Facebook friends to the core. Yet The Outlook staff is a little skeptical about downloading the latest big thing in technology.

Sure, Apple should definitely send out upgrades every so often. They have to keep up with customers’ needs and improve their products. Yet we aren’t so sure that Apple made that many changes.

The most obvious changes are aesthetic. The layout now looks like it went to a rave and dropped some acid with a Windows phone. They changed their font, there are so many colors everywhere and the icons now appear to look flatter. Seriously, did someone take a poll where most users thought Windows or Android phones were prettier? Other aesthetic changes were made to standard apps, such as Voice Memo, Calendar and Calculator. It just seems so unnecessary.

Then we have to wonder what functions actually changed in iOS7. We have easier access to settings such as Bluetooth and WiFi via the new Control Center, which is much appreciated. The search feature was moved from pressing the home button to a downward swipe. Again, unnecessary. The iTunes Radio feature is cool, but if you have Pandora or Spotify, it wasn’t really needed. 

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New MU Website: Beauty Without the Brains

The University launched the new website in late August. Students have had mixed reactions regarding the layout and accessibility. Members of The Outlook love the layout of the website and think it has modernized the way people look at the University’s technology. The major downside that The Outlook sees with the website is accessibility.

One issue The Outlook saw was that for current students, finding common resources such as WebStudent and eCampus are very difficult. One Outlook editor said that it appeared the University tried to do too many things at once and it can be overwhelming. The Outlook staff agrees that the website will be effective in bringing in prospective students but may end up frustrating current students.

Some Outlook staff members do point out that there will be a learning curve for everyone and are sure that the campus will adjust to them in short order. Students just need to acclimate and soon enough, it will be as simple to navigate as the old site. 

One staff member does ask, “Why the sudden change?” Another editor points out that the website has a great visual appeal and could help attract more students to the University.

While there are simple tabs at the bottom, especially for current students, even under that tab it is difficult to find some of the most used programs such as eCampus.

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“With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility”

September has finally ar­rived; A month hated by some and praised by others. The smell of fresh school supplies and the ocean is in the air. Freshmen can be found everywhere on campus smiling from ear to ear, excited to start their journey while se­niors give envious stares remem­bering their first move-in day. I am guilty of being one of those envious seniors.

This month is bittersweet to me. It marks the beginning of the end but it also marks me taking over as Editor-in- Chief of The Outlook. That is the sweet part to me.

During this school year we will be welcoming our new Uni­versity President, Dr. Paul R. Brown. We will also be celebrat­ing the 80th anniversary of The Outlook. With that being said, there is much to look forward to this year.

Over my past four years at­tending the University, I have had the honor of working with a truly amazing staff that has won many prestigious awards with the most recent award being the American Scholastic Press As­sociation’s Most Outstanding Newspaper of 2013. The previ­ous staffs of The Outlook have left not big, but giant shoes for us to fill. This is something that may intimidate people and scare them away from the challenge. As for me, I am determined to make those before me proud and to make those after me remem­ber what I accomplished.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu