Sat08192017

Last updateWed, 16 Aug 2017 8am

Editorial

Student Center Offers New Cuisine Options

Once again, the Rebecca Stafford Student Center has attempted to make changes to its dining services in hopes for more pleasurable feedback from those who visit the area. The Student Center now offers a few new options, along with a new look, and although these changes are a step in the right direction, there will always be room for improvement.

This year the Student Center brought Jersey Mike’s and Greens to Go as a few new stations to offer to the students and professional staff. While some people really enjoy these food choices, many find problems with certain aspects of the changes.

The Outlook staff favors the new station, Greens to Go because of the variety of options offered in the ‘Build it for you’ salads. In addition, the staff enjoys Jersey Mikes overall but is conscious when making a decision to buy a sub from there based on its high pricing.

One editor said, “We don’t need big name companies like Jersey Mike’s, just affordable, good food.”

Another mentioned, “...[ARAMARK] should have kept the Panini station and gotten rid of adding Jersey Mike’s because it’s overpriced.”

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iPhone Software Update iOS7: Loading...........

Three letters and one number are everywhere right now: iOS7. Oh yes, Apple released a new upgrade which has seems to have shaken our Facebook friends to the core. Yet The Outlook staff is a little skeptical about downloading the latest big thing in technology.

Sure, Apple should definitely send out upgrades every so often. They have to keep up with customers’ needs and improve their products. Yet we aren’t so sure that Apple made that many changes.

The most obvious changes are aesthetic. The layout now looks like it went to a rave and dropped some acid with a Windows phone. They changed their font, there are so many colors everywhere and the icons now appear to look flatter. Seriously, did someone take a poll where most users thought Windows or Android phones were prettier? Other aesthetic changes were made to standard apps, such as Voice Memo, Calendar and Calculator. It just seems so unnecessary.

Then we have to wonder what functions actually changed in iOS7. We have easier access to settings such as Bluetooth and WiFi via the new Control Center, which is much appreciated. The search feature was moved from pressing the home button to a downward swipe. Again, unnecessary. The iTunes Radio feature is cool, but if you have Pandora or Spotify, it wasn’t really needed. 

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New MU Website: Beauty Without the Brains

The University launched the new website in late August. Students have had mixed reactions regarding the layout and accessibility. Members of The Outlook love the layout of the website and think it has modernized the way people look at the University’s technology. The major downside that The Outlook sees with the website is accessibility.

One issue The Outlook saw was that for current students, finding common resources such as WebStudent and eCampus are very difficult. One Outlook editor said that it appeared the University tried to do too many things at once and it can be overwhelming. The Outlook staff agrees that the website will be effective in bringing in prospective students but may end up frustrating current students.

Some Outlook staff members do point out that there will be a learning curve for everyone and are sure that the campus will adjust to them in short order. Students just need to acclimate and soon enough, it will be as simple to navigate as the old site. 

One staff member does ask, “Why the sudden change?” Another editor points out that the website has a great visual appeal and could help attract more students to the University.

While there are simple tabs at the bottom, especially for current students, even under that tab it is difficult to find some of the most used programs such as eCampus.

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“With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility”

September has finally ar­rived; A month hated by some and praised by others. The smell of fresh school supplies and the ocean is in the air. Freshmen can be found everywhere on campus smiling from ear to ear, excited to start their journey while se­niors give envious stares remem­bering their first move-in day. I am guilty of being one of those envious seniors.

This month is bittersweet to me. It marks the beginning of the end but it also marks me taking over as Editor-in- Chief of The Outlook. That is the sweet part to me.

During this school year we will be welcoming our new Uni­versity President, Dr. Paul R. Brown. We will also be celebrat­ing the 80th anniversary of The Outlook. With that being said, there is much to look forward to this year.

Over my past four years at­tending the University, I have had the honor of working with a truly amazing staff that has won many prestigious awards with the most recent award being the American Scholastic Press As­sociation’s Most Outstanding Newspaper of 2013. The previ­ous staffs of The Outlook have left not big, but giant shoes for us to fill. This is something that may intimidate people and scare them away from the challenge. As for me, I am determined to make those before me proud and to make those after me remem­ber what I accomplished.

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Thank You For Everything President Gaffney

As the school year comes to a close, some of us say goodbye to the University for good, while others simply say “see ya later.” However, this concluding school year is not only bittersweet for graduating seniors but at the end of May, President Gaffney will also be saying his final goodbye.

Even though he will be missed, he will not be forgotten. Gaffney has truly left a lasting impression during his 10 years as President. Here at The Outlook we f eel t hat he did a great job at making stu­dents feel they were important. He likes to keep the students’ best interests in mind. One ex­ample is when he chose to cancel classes before Superstorm Sandy even got close to New Jersey. He knew that students, along with the other members of the MU com­munity, had to travel to all differ­ent places to be home with their families. One editor said, “He al­ways put the students first above all else, which is rare to see in a President.”

President Gaffney was sure to make himself visible, whether it was just walking around cam­pus or an athletic event. Many of us at The Outlook remember seeing him at a football game, a basketball game or even a track meet that was three hours away in Maryland. Another editor said he met Gaffney while he was wan­dering around Bey Hall. Gaffney told him that he had just been sit­ting in the back of a random class­room observing.

Any time he passed a student organization having a fundraiser, he was sure to donate what he had in his pocket. Students could find Gaffney absolutely anywhere. A President being so present is not always common when it comes to other schools, but our University was fortunate enough to have this experience.

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The Outlook Reflects on Boston Bombing

Boston_Marathon_bombingEvery so often in our lifetime, an unspeakable tragedy strikes and impacts all of our lives in ways we never could have imagined. On Monday, April 15, 2013, several explosions occurred near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Many of us at The Outlook immediately suspected it to be a terrorist attack, but little did we know that the search for the terrorists would put the city of Boston on lockdown for a day while the heroic officers of law en­forcement worked to catch the living suspect.

Although we are all very grate­ful that the suspects were found, we at The Outlook, as well as those around the world can’t help but ask why? Why would anyone want to cause this much harm to innocent people taking part in a wonderful tradition?

It was a horrific sight to watch the videos of the explosion. See­ing people running in fear, crying out in pain and frantically search­ing for loved ones made those of us miles away want to hold our loved ones a little closer than usual. Three lives were claimed by this tragedy, including that of an 8 year-old boy that had just finished congratulating his father on completing the race. Sean Collier, a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol­ogy, also lost his life when he was gunned down late Thursday night by the two bombing suspects.

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The Importance of Graduate Assistants

As University students, most of us have come in contact with and formed friendships with the gradu­ate assistants that are employed with the departments or activities that we each choose to participate in as un­dergraduates.

In theory, these graduate students simply work at the University to help facilitate certain tasks and work to­wards their own higher education. However, does a greater purpose for these graduate assistants exist? In the midst of universities and businesses attempting to downsize their costs, how important is it for the University to employ graduate assistants?

According to The Outlook staff, graduate assistants are much more than just a face in the corner typing away at a computer or performing some mundane task. Instead, it is a give-and-take relationship in which the graduate assistant often takes the place of a teacher. Undergraduate students, who are much closer in age to the graduate students than they would be to one of their own pro­fessors, receive insight from people who were in the same position not too long ago.

It is easy to learn from a graduate student who has “been-there-done-that,” who has already entered the “real world,” has walked away from Monmouth University with a diplo­ma, and who can still be a friend and colleague.

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Rutgers Proves Money is the Root of Evil in NCAA

By now, most have surely seen the video of former Rutgers’ Men’s Bas­ketball Head Coach Mike Rice and how he would conduct his practices. Rice fired the ball at his players, pushed and shoved them, and yelled homophobic slurs at them.

The Outlook staff is disgusted by what happened. This type of behav­ior is shocking, disgraceful, inappro­priate, ridiculous and has no place in college athletics.

We can’t believe that Rutgers didn’t fire Rice when the tapes were re­viewed in December. The school knew that when this story came out it would reflect poorly on them. So all they did was give Rice a $50,000 fine and a three game sus­pension, without any explanation. In this day and age, the truth always comes out. Schools have to stop trying to sweep these things under the rug and hope they will go away.

Money has to be the explanation for the Rutgers administration refus­ing to take bigger steps. Winning and revenue appears to have taken precedence over sportsmanship and human dignity. These are student athletes, not professionals.

While yes, they are on scholarship and were some of the best basketball players in the country in high school, they are still students. College is a time to learn and grow, and that means in the classroom and on the basketball court. The players aren’t going to be able to learn and grow when they are terrified that their in­structor is going to hit them again.

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Is Constant Campus Construction a Positive or Negative?

If anyone has stepped foot onto the campus over the past year, the tall tale signs reading “Please pardon our appearance while we are under construction” signal that campus construction is still whirling in its constant motion. For most students, the pounding of hammers and blocked-off pathways have become about as customary on campus as the historic Wilson Hall. With the constant construction for the past few years, some are left wondering what there really is to improve. Even more importantly is there anything worth further correcting at this time?

Here at The Outlook, we ponder much of the same thing, and with all of us being students, the first thing brought up when the topic is presented is the matter of how will it affect costs and tuition. When The Outlook asked Patti Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services, she assured that every year a separate construction fund is set aside in the overall budget, and that the construction, as most recently shown with the Joan and Robert Rechnitz Hall, is commonly run on donations from outside, nonstudent sources.

Although that adds a bit of security, some of us still remain a bit nervous about the possibility of spending beyond the budgeted means. All of which lead to the scare of tuition hikes, leaving some to say that the money should be withdrawn from other areas of the University in order to finish the construction.

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A New Hawk Joins the Nest

With the announcement of Pres­ident Paul Gaffney II’s retirement last year, we knew it was only a matter of time before the Univer­sity named its next president. That decision finally came on March 13, when the University named Lehigh’s current Dean of the Col­lege of Business and Economics, Dr. Paul R. Brown.

Up until this point, the only knowledge The Outlook had of Brown was based on his interac­tion with students when he visited in February. After the hiring, we were able to talk with him at great length and learn even more about him.

Our first impres­sion of him is that he is a good guy with good ambitions, but we still have a lot to learn about him.

So far, we learned that he would like to see the campus become more diverse, its space expanded, and for the school to continue to have growth in its educational programs.

All of these things sound great and would be very good improve­ments to campus. However, when we asked him what he would elim­inate he said that nothing came to mind. The Outlook would love to see him eliminate one prob­lem that has been prevalent at the University in recent years. This problem is of course the parking situation.

When he arrives, we recom­mend that he try finding a park­ing space in one of the commuter parking lots around 1:00 pm. It should make for an eye opening experience.

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Has Spring Break Calmed Down Since the Early 2000s?

Legend has it that when spring break happens, everyone gets wild and crazy. We’re supposed to travel to exotic locales with beaches and a lower legal drinking age. We’re sup­posed to spend the nights out on the town and spend our days sleeping off hangovers. That’s what MTV taught us.

The weird thing is, for most of us, spring break involves more sweat­pants than it does wet t-shirt con­tests. We’ve strayed away from the stereotypical MTV spring break for something more relaxed.

Spring break is in the middle of the semester, meaning our responsibili­ties don’t just go away. Many stu­dents have jobs that don’t follow the University’s schedule. Plenty of professors assign papers to do over break. Even when papers aren’t assigned, there is still a great deal of reading to do because professors know that we have a week off. Who has time to do keg stands when there are three papers due the week we get back?

Relaxation is what spring break is about for most of The Outlook staff. Midterms will finally be over and we can relax. Will we be sleeping in? Definitely. Wearing sweatpants? Yes, please. Watching “Boy Meets World” marathons? Absolutely. That isn’t to say that we’re all homebodies. Some of us will definitely be going out, but we’ll be going to local hang­outs to catch up with friends from our hometowns.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu