Thu10192017

Last updateWed, 18 Oct 2017 8am

Editorial

Hiding Behind the Wall of Technology

With the rise in technological use over the years, the way that we communicate has been altered. There is now a new form of communication among people, which has moved us away from face-to-face communication, and towards the new technology revolution. In addition to face-to-face communication, we are now able to speak to one another using text messages, emails and instant messaging, among many other forms of technologically advanced communication.

This new additional form of conversation can be both beneficial and detrimental to society in a number of ways. One downside is that some people have the ability to hide behind technology when communicating with others.

At one time or another, we have all done it. We have used technology to confront an issue or talk about a topic in an attempt to avoid the face-to-face awkwardness or fear.

Communication through technology creates a new form of confidence for people, allowing them to say things that they normally would never have the guts to say in person. The Outlook editors believe in many cases, this new-found confidence is not always a good thing. "If you cannot be a man, and yes this goes for women as well, and say it to my face, then don't say it at all," said one Outlook editor.

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“A” for Effort

Midterms are a very stressful time for college students. Between the normal hustle and bustle college life of balancing course work, internships, work, and extra-curricular activities, midterms apply that extra ounce of pressure that is just enough to really stress us out. However, the stress could be eased a bit if a student knows where they stand during midterms by having their grades available to them.

The easiest way to see where you stand in the class and having one place to reference your grades during the semester. That is why The Outlook staff would like to take the time to discuss why we feel it is important for professor's to give students their grades and academic feedback.

Most students feel more stress around midterms if they are unsure where they stand in their classes. This could be easily fixed through more academic feedback from professors, whether it be promptly returning papers and assignments or giving a layout for students to figure out their grades. Whether grades be handed back on paper, or through emails, it is always helpful for students to measure their success in their studying techniques and to learn from their mistakes on exams or in papers if they are given feedback quickly.

If professors give feedback to their students they can have a better understanding of what their professors are looking for in their work. It is important to understand a professor's grading style, so that students can improve their work to adjust for the class.

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Fall Break or Study Break?

Many students are still recovering from the misconception of fall break. While the term "break" implies a respite for students to go home and relax, most of The Outlook staff spent their two days of no classes writing papers and studying for midterms, which professors were required to submit by Tuesday, Oct. 22.

According to Dr. Franca Mancini, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services, fall break is scheduled in the academic calendar to give students a chance to physically and mentally recover from any stress caused by academics, extra-curricular activities or being away from home.

This stress is highest for college students at this time of year. Mancini said, "It is true, also, that requests for services tend to increase during this time of year, and we see another spike right after mid-terms, when students realistically assess where they stand in their classes. Overall, on our campus and nationwide, the number of students requesting mental health services is between 9 to 11 percent. Monmouth is no different."

The Outlook staff believes that having midterms the week following fall break was much more work than we were equipped to handle. We understand that professors have deadlines to meet as well, but some of the editors think that due dates for papers and exams could have been spread out so we had more time to prepare. While those few hours we spent in class on Thursday and Friday were now ours to spend, however, other obligations, such as work or internships did not offer us breaks.

One editor points out that fall break could just as well have been called reading days for midterms, like the University gives us before finals. Calling those two days a "break" deceived some of The Outlook staff into believing we had time to relax. Meanwhile, the homework piled up and we were faced with even more worries the following Monday than we had when we left campus.

Time management should not be a concern if the time we are given is supposed to be for relaxing, spending time with family and avoiding anything that may cause us to worry. However, if we do not manage our time wisely, we end up buried in assignments upon our return to the University.

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Breast Cancer Awareness Overload?

It is about halfway through the month of October and everyone has come to the realization that the color pink is everywhere.

As most of America can conclude, October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. With a whole month dedicated to this type of cancer, it seems that everyone from Dunkin' Donuts to the NFL is in support of this cause.

Many believe that this month dedicated to awareness, has spiraled out of control and is a bit to the extreme. It seems that a month of trying to bring attention to this illness and raise money for the cause started off with good intentions but has been taken out of context and could sometimes be used as a business ploy.

The Outlook feels strongly about bringing awareness to the very serious issue of cancer. October is filled with breast cancer walks, fundraisers and wonderful events to try to find a cure for this horrific disease.

The Outlook recognizes how incredible it is that the public comes together for a month to support breast cancer; however, there are various other types of cancers that may not be as treatable as Breast Cancer and should be recognized and brought forward.

Collectively, The Outlook knows that people suffer from other cancers as well, but those forms of cancer do not receive the large amount of attention that Breast Cancer does. Another dangerous and most often terminal disease is heart disease, but it does not gain nearly the same coverage as breast cancer.

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Student Involvement? Not So Much.

Multiple clubs and organization make great efforts at hosting events on campus, but The Outlook staff believes that improvement on student attendance can be made.

We believe that one possibility can be whether the events offered on-campus are of student interest or not. This is still up for debate amongst the staff, yet we do give organizations and clubs like the Student Activities Board (SAB) credit for the way they advertise their events and push for student involvement. Email is usually the common form of how clubs and organizations reach out to students,. However, the vast majority of the student body deletes these invitations upon receiving them.

While there are certain events that occur on campus which have hosted a larger amount of students, these events usually only obtain such an audience when there is an obligation for a class or a chance for extra credit. While The Outlook staff does notice that Monmouth has a record of hosting events with large student turnouts that aren't a part of an academic commitment, like the Involvement Fair or the Fall Carnival. However most of the other events fall under the wayside with less than a couple dozen students attending.

Commuters in particular find it difficult at times to attend events on campus in their free time. Since the majority of the University's student body is made up of commuter students, we feel that events must be more commuter-friendly. With events that clash with work, class and other obligations, events on campus appear to be aimed at the small population of students already living on campus.

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Student Center Offers New Cuisine Options

Once again, the Rebecca Stafford Student Center has attempted to make changes to its dining services in hopes for more pleasurable feedback from those who visit the area. The Student Center now offers a few new options, along with a new look, and although these changes are a step in the right direction, there will always be room for improvement.

This year the Student Center brought Jersey Mike’s and Greens to Go as a few new stations to offer to the students and professional staff. While some people really enjoy these food choices, many find problems with certain aspects of the changes.

The Outlook staff favors the new station, Greens to Go because of the variety of options offered in the ‘Build it for you’ salads. In addition, the staff enjoys Jersey Mikes overall but is conscious when making a decision to buy a sub from there based on its high pricing.

One editor said, “We don’t need big name companies like Jersey Mike’s, just affordable, good food.”

Another mentioned, “...[ARAMARK] should have kept the Panini station and gotten rid of adding Jersey Mike’s because it’s overpriced.”

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iPhone Software Update iOS7: Loading...........

Three letters and one number are everywhere right now: iOS7. Oh yes, Apple released a new upgrade which has seems to have shaken our Facebook friends to the core. Yet The Outlook staff is a little skeptical about downloading the latest big thing in technology.

Sure, Apple should definitely send out upgrades every so often. They have to keep up with customers’ needs and improve their products. Yet we aren’t so sure that Apple made that many changes.

The most obvious changes are aesthetic. The layout now looks like it went to a rave and dropped some acid with a Windows phone. They changed their font, there are so many colors everywhere and the icons now appear to look flatter. Seriously, did someone take a poll where most users thought Windows or Android phones were prettier? Other aesthetic changes were made to standard apps, such as Voice Memo, Calendar and Calculator. It just seems so unnecessary.

Then we have to wonder what functions actually changed in iOS7. We have easier access to settings such as Bluetooth and WiFi via the new Control Center, which is much appreciated. The search feature was moved from pressing the home button to a downward swipe. Again, unnecessary. The iTunes Radio feature is cool, but if you have Pandora or Spotify, it wasn’t really needed. 

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New MU Website: Beauty Without the Brains

The University launched the new website in late August. Students have had mixed reactions regarding the layout and accessibility. Members of The Outlook love the layout of the website and think it has modernized the way people look at the University’s technology. The major downside that The Outlook sees with the website is accessibility.

One issue The Outlook saw was that for current students, finding common resources such as WebStudent and eCampus are very difficult. One Outlook editor said that it appeared the University tried to do too many things at once and it can be overwhelming. The Outlook staff agrees that the website will be effective in bringing in prospective students but may end up frustrating current students.

Some Outlook staff members do point out that there will be a learning curve for everyone and are sure that the campus will adjust to them in short order. Students just need to acclimate and soon enough, it will be as simple to navigate as the old site. 

One staff member does ask, “Why the sudden change?” Another editor points out that the website has a great visual appeal and could help attract more students to the University.

While there are simple tabs at the bottom, especially for current students, even under that tab it is difficult to find some of the most used programs such as eCampus.

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“With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility”

September has finally ar­rived; A month hated by some and praised by others. The smell of fresh school supplies and the ocean is in the air. Freshmen can be found everywhere on campus smiling from ear to ear, excited to start their journey while se­niors give envious stares remem­bering their first move-in day. I am guilty of being one of those envious seniors.

This month is bittersweet to me. It marks the beginning of the end but it also marks me taking over as Editor-in- Chief of The Outlook. That is the sweet part to me.

During this school year we will be welcoming our new Uni­versity President, Dr. Paul R. Brown. We will also be celebrat­ing the 80th anniversary of The Outlook. With that being said, there is much to look forward to this year.

Over my past four years at­tending the University, I have had the honor of working with a truly amazing staff that has won many prestigious awards with the most recent award being the American Scholastic Press As­sociation’s Most Outstanding Newspaper of 2013. The previ­ous staffs of The Outlook have left not big, but giant shoes for us to fill. This is something that may intimidate people and scare them away from the challenge. As for me, I am determined to make those before me proud and to make those after me remem­ber what I accomplished.

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Thank You For Everything President Gaffney

As the school year comes to a close, some of us say goodbye to the University for good, while others simply say “see ya later.” However, this concluding school year is not only bittersweet for graduating seniors but at the end of May, President Gaffney will also be saying his final goodbye.

Even though he will be missed, he will not be forgotten. Gaffney has truly left a lasting impression during his 10 years as President. Here at The Outlook we f eel t hat he did a great job at making stu­dents feel they were important. He likes to keep the students’ best interests in mind. One ex­ample is when he chose to cancel classes before Superstorm Sandy even got close to New Jersey. He knew that students, along with the other members of the MU com­munity, had to travel to all differ­ent places to be home with their families. One editor said, “He al­ways put the students first above all else, which is rare to see in a President.”

President Gaffney was sure to make himself visible, whether it was just walking around cam­pus or an athletic event. Many of us at The Outlook remember seeing him at a football game, a basketball game or even a track meet that was three hours away in Maryland. Another editor said he met Gaffney while he was wan­dering around Bey Hall. Gaffney told him that he had just been sit­ting in the back of a random class­room observing.

Any time he passed a student organization having a fundraiser, he was sure to donate what he had in his pocket. Students could find Gaffney absolutely anywhere. A President being so present is not always common when it comes to other schools, but our University was fortunate enough to have this experience.

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The Outlook Reflects on Boston Bombing

Boston_Marathon_bombingEvery so often in our lifetime, an unspeakable tragedy strikes and impacts all of our lives in ways we never could have imagined. On Monday, April 15, 2013, several explosions occurred near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Many of us at The Outlook immediately suspected it to be a terrorist attack, but little did we know that the search for the terrorists would put the city of Boston on lockdown for a day while the heroic officers of law en­forcement worked to catch the living suspect.

Although we are all very grate­ful that the suspects were found, we at The Outlook, as well as those around the world can’t help but ask why? Why would anyone want to cause this much harm to innocent people taking part in a wonderful tradition?

It was a horrific sight to watch the videos of the explosion. See­ing people running in fear, crying out in pain and frantically search­ing for loved ones made those of us miles away want to hold our loved ones a little closer than usual. Three lives were claimed by this tragedy, including that of an 8 year-old boy that had just finished congratulating his father on completing the race. Sean Collier, a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol­ogy, also lost his life when he was gunned down late Thursday night by the two bombing suspects.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu