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Last updateWed, 20 Sep 2017 1pm

Opinion

TMI: Too Much Information

How much Information is Too Much Information When Meeting New People?


The first time you’re meeting someone, it’s typical to give them general information about yourself. My name is Amanda Drennan, I’m a senior at Monmouth, and I have an undying love for dogs.

But now with social media there’s a lot of information about ourselves that can be found online, and it’s usually easily accessible. If someone takes a look at your social media page, they can see almost anything you’ve posted since you started your page. It’s not only what you post on social media that’s out there, but also what other people post about you. It all lends to to what a person can learn about you without actually ever meeting you. We’ve all been there, looked through someone’s page before we actually get to know them (and don’t act like you’ve never lurked through someone’s page to learn more about them).

It’s easy for us to word vomit information about ourselves to people when we first meet them, especially with so much about ourselves being available online. But what’s too much to tell people? There’s nothing wrong with being open, but some things are just better off kept to yourself. The first time you meet someone it can be overwhelming if they’re just spewing information about him/herself at you.

When you’re first getting to know someone, it’s better to start off with basic information about yourself. This can help you find common interests with the person. If you start off telling them your whole life story from birth to today, don’t be surprised if they’re staring at you like you have two heads.

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A Decade Review: The 80s

Thanking the 80s for its Contributions to Today’s World


Decade Review Metallica

It’s hard to believe that the 1980s were about 30 years ago, especially with glimpses of the decade emerging in today’s pop culture. Honestly, I never really liked the 80s. I always thought the decade was corny and obnoxious- from the oversized shoulder pads to the oversaturation of bright neon.

I still do for the most part, but I’ve come to realize that its obnoxiousness is what made it one of the most memorable decades in recent history. It’s much more than just the surface trends I mentioned before. In fact, there were a lot of other firsts that we have to accredit the 80s for making popular; a lot of the things we enjoy today wouldn’t have existed or been discovered.

 

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Life Lessons for an MU Student from Gossip Girl

Life Lessons Gossip GirlHey, West Long Branch residents! As the Fall semester is now officially in full swing, Gossip Girl has a few tips for all students looking to be as successful as ever this year and every year.

Common knowledge tells us Gossip Girl is most famous for its attractive cast and endless drama, but, there are some great takeaways that we miss amongst the Lonely Boy vs. Chuck Bass battles.

Although Gossip Girl may have started in 2007, the cast proves in every episode that fashion is the top priority. Early 2000s style may be a little outdated, but, Blair Waldorf taught the audience that first impressions via wardrobe say more about you than anything else.

Being college students, most of the time, our wardrobe consists of Monmouth t-shirts, shorts, sweats, and plenty of hoodies, but going into an interview for an internship or just a part-time job means dressing the part. There aren’t any rules against certain clothes, or rather, there aren’t any written rules, but it is crucial to be taken seriously in situations like interviews or job fairs. Messy buns, sweatpants, and ripped jeans or tees are on the ‘Do Not Wear’ list, but, wearing a blouse, khakis, or skirts mean you’re willing to look the part and be professional in any setting because, “It shows the world who we are and who we’d like to be.”

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“Brangelina” Under Scrutiny

Test of True Love in the Limelight


I was sitting in one of my English classes listening to my teacher talk about one of Shakespeare’s plays when I found out that Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt filed for divorce. Since it happened, there has been non-stop coverage of their messy divorce. With headlines about how they will split their assets and all these speculations about what caused their marriage to end, it is getting just as much coverage as the ongoing presidential election between Trump and Clinton.

On one hand, I’m really sick and tired of the way the media constantly publicizes the personal lives of celebrities, but this also makes me wonder whether true love exist anymore if you’re a famous figure? This question has a bit irony in it because one of the discussions we had in my Shakespeare class is whether Shakespeare was the forerunner of writing about “true love.” Is the concept of true love something that many famous people cannot find given that privacy and maintaining a sense of normalcy is off limits because they are always in the spotlight?

I remember when Jolie and Pitt’s speculated romantic relationship was all the buzz after the 2005 release of the film Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Their chemistry was okay in the movie, but I did not follow the speculations that these two actors were getting chummy off screen. I didn’t pay much attention to the buzz surrounding them until news broke that Pitt divorced his then wife Jennifer Aniston and about a month later he was with Jolie.

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Participation: A Valuable Skill in and Beyond the Classroom

Classroom ParticipationThe idea that an 18-year-old student is paying thousands of dollars to sit in a classroom and listen to someone talk about a topic for 3 hours is supposed to make you ready for the real world is really a crazy concept when you think about it. This is a reality for many college students (and even kids in high school and grade school) who do not care about school and think they can get by just sitting in the back of the room and not participating.

An emphasis on participation may be seen as unnecessary and trivial to some students, but really participation is the best way for a professor or teacher to see that you are actually learning something and getting something out of the class.

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Gotta Catch ‘Em All

Pokemon GoIf you see herds of people walking around with their heads down staring at their phones, there’s a good chance they’re playing Pokémon Go. The app was released in July and it’s been a pretty popular game since then.

The app uses GPS tracking to tell where you are and allow you to catch Pokémon that have spawned in your area. This means that in order to catch new Pokémon, the user literally has to walk around. There are landmarks that are called “Pokéstops,” which allow you to collect items like pokéballs, to catch your Pokémon. This app, like most, has a good side and bad side.

This app creates a new problem for users that, for most video games, isn’t a huge problem. The game requires you to walk around, which doesn’t seem like a problem at first. The drawback to this app is the users who are walking around looking down at their phones for Pokémon. They aren’t always paying attention to their surroundings.

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Life Lessons for an MU Student from Legally Blonde

Legally BlondeIt’s no shock that Legally Blonde has some of the most memorable quotes in movie history, but it’s deep-rooted life lessons are what make the movie that much ‘funner’!

Do you know that internal churning and sweaty-palmed feeling when a professor calls on you and you don’t know the answer? No? Just me? Well, Elle Woods had the exact feeling when she didn’t read, or for that matter, even have her textbook before class.

Our professors tend to drill into our brains that we need to be ready for class, that we need to be prepared and have our books for class no matter what, to avoid that pre-court Elle Woods feeling, but we don’t always listen. The worst case scenario happened to Elle; she was kicked out of class because she wasn’t properly prepared.

To avoid that major embarrassment, always have your textbooks/notes ready for class and try not to avoid questions, but rather boldly try to answer a question even if you aren’t positive that you’re right. The worst that can happen is you’re wrong and you’ll end up learning something new.

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Life, Liberty, & the Pursuit of Social Justice

A Look on Colin Kaepernick’s Recent Stand (Pun Intended)


The First Amendment in the Constitution has always been viewed as one of our most important rights as an American citizen. Recently, our right to freedom of speech and expression of thought has created great controversy in the case of San Francisco 49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick.

The football player has been refusing to stand for the national anthem in protest of police brutality. Kaepernick said, “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color.”

Liam Frank, a senior music industry student, explains, “I know that Colin Kaepernick is a talented quarterback with a good amount of fame surrounding him, and I think that he has brought attention to a controversial, but important, issue in America. He’s donated to causes supporting minorities mentioned in his protests, and used his fame as a venue for social justice advocacy.”

The problems of police brutality and minority oppression in this country are very real and cannot be ignored, however, does Kaepernick have the right to express his political views during the playing of the national anthem? Sydney Underhill, a senior on the Monmouth University softball team and a graduate student in public policy program said, “I believe that the flag protects his right to do just what he and the other athletes who have followed suit have chosen to do.”

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Life Lessons for an MU Student from Family Feud

Family FeudFamily Feud has been one of America’s favorite game shows for a very long time—back to when Richard Dawson was the host. Even as a child, I was a big fan of Family Feud—to the point where I even downloaded the app and played by myself. I know, riveting childhood I had; that being said, I think that there are definitely some valuable life lessons one can learn from the game show.

One lesson that can be learned from Family Feud is that you should take loss with grace; simply, just don’t be a sore loser. Many times, families on Family Feud lose by even one point, which is totally devastating. Regardless of how they really feel, they take losses with a smile and laugh it off (hey, they do get to come back the next week). The same goes for families who lose the first round and don’t even get to go to the Fast Money Round. They don’t get to come back, and they’re still all smiles.

Another life lesson that can be learned from watching Family Feud is that no matter how many times you do lose, that you should just keep trying—perseverance. I’ve seen episodes where the same family comes back multiple times and they just keep losing. Honestly, it’s inspiring how much tenacity they have to keep coming back and never giving anything less than 100 percent.

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Is Facebook Logging Out?

Though many social media sites come and go just as fast as they appeared- I am talking to you Myspace- there are some that stick around for the long run.

Facebook has been a vital part of my life ever since I joined back in my middle school years. Being that I live far away from most of my family members, Facebook is an easy way to see what everyone is up to. As of late, many have been saying that Facebook is a dying force. I happen to believe otherwise. In fact, I would go so far as to say Facebook has been gaining a new popularity amongst the general public ranging anywhere from about 18-25 years old, the traditional college-aged adult. I was talking to my mom- the same person who used to religiously play “Farmville” and now simply uses it to share ridiculous amounts of videos- about Facebook’s relevance when I realized I was clearly talking to the wrong person.

Some may be wondering: “Well, I don’t use it much, I don’t see how it’s popular anymore.” Have you noticed that one of the main ways our Monmouth University community sticks together is Facebook? We have groups such as: “Monmouth University Class of 2018” and “Monmouth Commuter Students,” or even “NSO Blue Squad,” and so on and so forth. We have continually used Facebook for all Monmouth necessities, as luck would have it, even for writing topics within The Outlook itself for different sections like Opinion and Features use Facebook. There are limitless opportunities we have taken advantage of within Monmouth while weaving Facebook into our plans and it would seem as though we won’t ever stop- cue the chorus of “We Can’t Stop” please!

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Is there #JusticeForHarambe?

A Look at the Effects of Social Media on the Cincinnati Zoo


HarambeThe name “Harambe” has been plastered on social media a lot lately. A few months ago a young boy fell into the gorilla cage at the Cincinnati Zoo. Unfortunately, the zoo was given the ultimatum of either saving the boy’s life or shooting the gorilla. The zoo officials decided that the life of the little boy would be saved, and the gorilla, Harambe, died.

The child fell into the enclosure, and the gorilla was dragging him around. The zoo officials feared that if they tranquilized the gorilla he would have become more enraged and hurt the child before he would be saved. Something needed to be done quickly about the situation and the zoo staff thought that this was the best way to handle it. There were several staff members from the zoo that spoke about the situation, all agreeing that the right thing had been done in this situation.

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