Thu06222017

Last updateTue, 20 Jun 2017 11pm

Politics

The Race to the White House 2016: What is It Truly About?

The 2016 general election for president of the U.S. has been at the center of news media and social media; a definitive change from prior elections. With mass media and social media at the forefront, the polls can be easily swayed since information is so vastly available.

Nearly two weeks away from the general election and many voters do not know much about either candidate except for the negative attacks being thrown from each side. Some have thought this election would prove to be advantageous for the Republican establishment since a Democrat has held office for eight years. However, with the election coming closer it seems both candidates are ready for the final push.

According to RealClearPoltics polls from various pollsters, one candidate is up by anywhere from 1-20 points over the other. Some polls note a tie. There are variations in the polls based on the news outlet or poll conducting the research. A tight race has ensued leaving each candidate trying to secure their spot in this election. The problem with this election is that each candidate has ardent supporters or they are loathed. This factor is one that makes this election rather heated since each candidate has many negatives against them.

Regardless of each candidate’s flaws, many people note that this election has been dirty. It has not been centered on policy or the American people. At this stage in the race, Clinton is touring the country with supporters, such as First Lady Michelle Obama.

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Trump and Clinton Go Head to Head in Second Debate

debateOn Sunday night, 66.5 million eople tuned in to watch the second debate between presidential nominees Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

A part of the election cycle since 1992, the second debate has a town hall setting. The candidates were away from the podium and have the ability to answer questions from audience members. Other questions were taken from social media, or asked by the moderators, CNN’s Anderson Cooper and ABC News’ Martha Raddatz.

Lorna Schmidt, Director of Advising, said, “I felt that the two of them were trying to convince each other of their point, and those are the last people they should be arguing to. They should be arguing to the audience. You never going to convince the person you’re debating, its those people our there you have to convince.”

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MU Polling Institute Named in Fake Memo

An apparent fake, leaked polling memo that was intended to spin polling results in favor of Democratic Presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, surfaced in the media late last month from the Monmouth Polling Institute— and left the polling institute members answering angry social media users.

On Sept. 21, a website called Real True News published a story claiming that a leaked Monmouth polling memo surfaced that urged the poll to change the narrative of the election. The website claimed that the accomplished pollster from fivethirtyeight.com, Nate Silver, had sent the memo. However, the name on the memo was blacked out.

The story came out shortly after the polling institute released its latest numbers, showing Clinton regaining momentum in Florida and criticizing them because they had published two polls that favored Donald Trump the week before.

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Bridgegate and Impeachment: Politics or Corruption?

On Sept. 9, 2013, two toll lanes were closed to the upper deck of the George Washington Bridge. Many officials such as police and emergency medical workers claimed not knowing of the lane closures during the morning rush hour was an extreme threat to the public safety of the city.

Many wonder what the true intentions were behind this potentially dangerous act. Several theories swirl throughout the media and internet.

However, the prevailing notion is that the closures were to be a form of rebellion and attack against the mayor at a hefty price tag to locals. In the scandal, many of Christie’s employees resigned in fear of backlash. Port Authority Director, Patrick Foye required the lanes be reopened and they were finally reopened after much struggle on Sept. 13, 2013. Members of the Fort Lee community note that people could have very well died in this dangerous attempt to be cynical for a political statement.

The motives of officials have always been questioned throughout the trial; namely Gov. Christie. Time and time again, people speculate whether or not the New Jersey governor had any inclination that this would occur on a Monday morning rush hour. Legal implications and charges were set against Christie’s former Chief-of-Staff, Bridget Anne Kelly and Port Authority employees appointed by Chris Christie; Mr. Baroni and Mr. Wildstein. All three people were charged with conspiracy of fraud for political motives. Eventually, they all resigned.

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Sparks Fly at First Presidential Debate

First Presidential DebateLast night was the first of three presidential debates between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton held at Hofstra University and aired on CNN— where more than 80 million people tuned into the debate between the two candidates, making it the most watched televised presidential debate in United States history.

Sparks flew early and often during the debate but the candidates did not spar as hard as many would have thought. Dr. Stephen Chapman, a professor of political science, said that this wasn’t unusual because “the first debate is usually about feeling each other out.”

He referred to President Barrack Obama’s performance in the first presidential debate against Mitt Romney in 2012. He said, “Many people have said that Barrack Obama came out flat and lost the first debate but he took that debate to feel out his opponent and come up with strategy.”

Nonetheless, Chapman concluded that the first debate is still important. He commented, “I think it’s crucial since it was the first time they are on the stage together after all of this campaigning.”

The debate included multiple topics and issues that were important to the candidates who are still trying to reach out to undecided voters. Both candidates were expected to be able to answer tough questions.

For Trump, the Director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute and specialist professor Peter Reinhart said, “There are several lines of questions that may prove difficult for Mr. Trump.”

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‘Rock the Vote’ at Monmouth

Rock The VoteOn Sept. 26, Monmouth held the first of its three “Rock the Vote” events in front of the Rebecca Stafford Student Center on campus where students quickly and easily registered to vote in this year’s presidential election while enjoying live music from “Band Not Scared.” The event was hosted by the University’s political science club and was sponsored and received help from the Student Activities Board (SAB) and many other on campus clubs and organizations.

Associate Professor of Political Science Dr. Joseph Patten said, “We are having a lot of success drawing people [to register] in between classes.”

According to Patten, the club encouraged roughly 50 students to register within just one hour.

Patten also said that this would be the first of three Rock the Vote events. He said that they will be hosting two more before the Oct. 18 voter registration deadline.

According to Patten, the events registered about 170 student voters last semester. He aspires to do even better this semester.

Students from the political science club that participated in helping with the event stressed the importance of the University assisting its students with voter registration.

Junior political science student Angela Ryan said, “I think this event is great and that we had support from many different clubs and organizations. It’s really good that we’re getting students to register to vote. It will help them to be make informed decisions when they vote in November.”

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Election Polling Update 9/28

9/19 Sienna College
Florida Poll:

Trump: 43

Clinton: 43

9/19 Loras College Illinois Poll:

Clinton: 47

Trump: 33

9/18 Minneapolis Star
Tribune Minnesota Poll:

Clinton: 44

Trump: 38

9/18 Sooner Oklahoma Poll:

Trump: 51

Clinton: 36

9/17 Morning Call/ Muhlenberg Pennsylvania Poll:

Clinton: 47

Trump: 38

9/15 Emerson College Arkansas Poll:

Trump: 57

Clinton: 29

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Politics and Terrorism: How Does It Affect Elections?

Ronald ReganAfter the weekend of many terrible tragedies throughout the country, citizens have turned to the people we have elected in our moments of crisis. But what exactly do we look for in these public figures in our times of need?

One of the most iconic speeches to be delivered in a time of crisis was in Jan. 28, 1986, when President Ronald Regan addressed the nation of the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

It was the day President Regan was to prepare for his State of the Union address, but instead delivered a speech that would be one of the highlights of his career.  “The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we’ll continue to follow them.”

He honored the lives that were lost and made the country feel united. Former House of Representatives Tip O’Niell wrote in his book, “it was a trying day for all Americans and Ronald Reagan spoke to our highest ideals.”

The nation looks for comfort in the people they vote to put in office and that is what they should be getting.  Once a tragedy takes place, people expect that politicians know the details of the occurrence and do what they can for everyone to be safe. 

According to The Hill, “Civilans need to know if they are safe, if this is or is not an attack, and what they should do to stay out of harms way.”

With the election only 50 days away, how a politician, or a candidate, reacts to an attack or a tragedy can effect how the public perceives them.

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Election Polling Update 9/21

9/19 Sienna College Florida Poll:

Trump: 43

Clinton: 43

9/19 Loras College Illinois Poll:

Clinton: 47

Trump: 33

9/18 Minneapolis Star Tribune Minnesota Poll:

Clinton: 44

Trump: 38

9/18 Sooner Oklahoma Poll:

Trump: 51

Clinton: 36

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Debate: Opening Weekend of the NFL Gets Political, Against the Protest

NFL Gets PoliticalLast Sunday was significant to many Americans as it was the opening weekend of NFL football, and more importantly, the fif-teenth anniversary of the attacks on our nation suffered on September 11th, 2001. However, perhaps what was getting the most at-tention from the fans this year were the actions of the players before the game and not during– due to the symbolic protest of not standing during the national anthem because of racial inequalities started in the preseason by San Francisco 49’s quarter-back, Collin Kaepernick, that has caught on with players from around the league. These protests represented the controversial topic of race that has especially consumed the nature of the media and politics of the nation over the last year and a half and the topic is much bigger than football. However, it is my firm belief that some of these NFL players are demonstrating on this issue the wrong way.

To be fair, there were some players that showed strength and symbolism in noncontroversial ways. For example, there were ru-mors swirling around the media that the entire Seattle Seahawks team would kneel during the national anthem. However, they in-stead chose to all link arms for the anthem. By doing this, the Seahawks took the high road by showing respect to the flag on the an-niversary of a great tragedy, while showing unity among their players– white and black.

It was upsetting to me that many players did not stand for the national anthem, especially on the anniversary of 9/11. Although race relations in our country have improved a great deal in the past few decades, there is no denying that racial tensions still exist. However, disrespecting our nations flag isn’t going to help the cause. First, demonstrating frustration in that way just adds fuel to the fire. The NFL players that didn’t stand are not the only people in the country that have used irresponsible rhetoric in response to this problem.

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Debate: Opening Weekend of NFL, For the Protest

NFL Gets PoliticalFootball is America’s favorite sport, and millions tune in to watch during the season, let alone opening weekend. So when Colin Kaepernick decided to not stand up during the National Anthem, it caused a huge discussion of the nature of protests.

Something that I have always found astonishing about American history is that some of the greatest social developments have been advanced with the help of protests. Women, racial and even animal rights have had their breakthroughs in society because brave men and women have voiced their opinions and stood for what they believed was right, sometimes even when the consequences could have been deadly.

And of course, this is the “Land of the Free” and the very first amendment that our founding fathers wrote was the freedom of speech. It sets America apart from other countries, and is the reason why the progression of the quality of life and people’s rights has been what it is and I hope that never changes.

Having Kaepernick take a stand by not standing because of the racial inequality in America has sparked a conversation of the issues at hand. He knew he had the platform to get the nation’s attention and he went for it. He risked his career and having his peers look at him differently for something he believed deserved to be looked at. And now other people have fallen in his footsteps.

Many people, however, have disagreed with the actions of these players, deeming it disrespectful to the country and to the men and women that fight for our rights.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
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Monmouth University
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Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu