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Last updateWed, 18 Sep 2019 12pm

Features

How to Preserve College Memories

College MemoriesAt just eighteen years old, we are thrown into the world of college. We graduate from lockers to dorm rooms, school cafeterias to dining halls (and Dunkin’ Donuts on campus), and pre-determined class periods to self-made schedules. The biggest change of all is that students control their fate for their four years at Monmouth University.

There is a great amount of adaptation and responsibility that comes with college. However, there is an even greater support system made up of upperclassmen and professors.

Monmouth University’s Support Services helps ensure that each freshman has a smooth transition into their first year of college.

With that being said, here are a few tips to help freshman feel at ease throughout their first year at Monmouth.

Making friends is not easy for everyone; especially in college where there is a wide variety of people. Joining a club is a great way to make friends because it brings together students with common interests.

The annual involvement fair will be taking place on Friday, Sept. 13 from 5-7 p.m. on Shadow Lawn in front of Wilson Hall. Each club, sport, and activity on campus will be representing themselves and recruiting new members at tables where they will have giveaways such as pens, water bottles, and snacks.

Frank Fury, Ph.D., Director of Writing Services, Department of English Advising Coordinator, and a Lecturer of English, encourages students to get involved on campus. He said, “Involvement often helps the student feel more ‘at home’ in a new environment.” The fair is a great opportunity to narrow down the clubs that appeal to oneself while also having a fun night out of the dorm room.

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Global Go-Getters: Monmouth Alumni Take on London

MU Alumni LondonOn the second floor of Wilson Hall, up the marble staircase and around the balcony, lies the office of President Patrick Leahy. Already known by students and faculty for his warm personality, he creates an inviting space that encompasses Monmouth’s campus.

Previously holding the position of president at Wilkes University, Leahy’s heart has been in education for decades. He credits his interest in pursuing his profession to one of his English professors at Georgetown University, who also happened to be the university president.

“It was the experience of getting to know him and understanding his life,” said Leahy, reflecting upon his own undergraduate career. “I said to myself, ‘that is such an interesting way to live one’s life; someday I’d like to be a university president’. And that’s what happened.”

The experience of getting to know his university president was not his only motivating factor, however. Settling in his spacious office, he recounted a story about his grandfather, who only had the opportunity to get a seventh-grade education before leaving school to support his family as a manual laborer.

“He wanted desperately to be an educated person but never had that opportunity,” Leahy said of his grandfather. “That inspires me to make sure that not only do my family get well-educated, but that we do everything we can at this university to make sure that we’re making a first-class private education as accessible to students who deserve it as possible.”

For generations, the Leahy family has placed education as their highest priority. He said, “Education is the key to creating opportunities for people. My grandfather used to say, ‘if you give someone an education, you give them a chance’. That’s what motivates me.”

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Tips for First-Year Students

Tips First YearAt just eighteen years old, we are thrown into the world of college. We graduate from lockers to dorm rooms, school cafeterias to dining halls (and Dunkin’ Donuts on campus), and pre-determined class periods to self-made schedules. The biggest change of all is that students control their fate for their four years at Monmouth University.

There is a great amount of adaptation and responsibility that comes with college. However, there is an even greater support system made up of upperclassmen and professors.

Monmouth University’s Support Services helps ensure that each freshman has a smooth transition into their first year of college.

With that being said, here are a few tips to help freshman feel at ease throughout their first year at Monmouth.

Making friends is not easy for everyone; especially in college where there is a wide variety of people. Joining a club is a great way to make friends because it brings together students with common interests.

The annual involvement fair will be taking place on Friday, Sept. 13 from 5-7 p.m. on Shadow Lawn in front of Wilson Hall. Each club, sport, and activity on campus will be representing themselves and recruiting new members at tables where they will have giveaways such as pens, water bottles, and snacks.

Read more ...

Patrick Leahy: The Making of a University President

Leahy Making PresidentOn the second floor of Wilson Hall, up the marble staircase and around the balcony, lies the office of President Patrick Leahy. Already known by students and faculty for his warm personality, he creates an inviting space that encompasses Monmouth’s campus.

Previously holding the position of president at Wilkes University, Leahy’s heart has been in education for decades. He credits his interest in pursuing his profession to one of his English professors at Georgetown University, who also happened to be the university president.

“It was the experience of getting to know him and understanding his life,” said Leahy, reflecting upon his own undergraduate career. “I said to myself, ‘that is such an interesting way to live one’s life; someday I’d like to be a university president’. And that’s what happened.”

The experience of getting to know his university president was not his only motivating factor, however. Settling in his spacious office, he recounted a story about his grandfather, who only had the opportunity to get a seventh-grade education before leaving school to support his family as a manual laborer.

“He wanted desperately to be an educated person but never had that opportunity,” Leahy said of his grandfather. “That inspires me to make sure that not only do my family get well-educated, but that we do everything we can at this university to make sure that we’re making a first-class private education as accessible to students who deserve it as possible.”

Read more ...

Student Spotlight on Tymere Berry

Spotlight BerryTymere Berry is a senior communication student and a defensive back for Monmouth’s football team.

A native of Philadelphia, Berry was born to a single 19-year-old mother. Berry moved back and forth with his grandmother and mother, until age seven, when he moved permanently to Toms River, NJ.

At eight, Berry found out that football could take him a long way.

“I never played flag-football; my first year was tackle. My first position was running back. I’ve played football every year since then,” he said.

At Toms River South High School, Berry was selected for First Team All-Shore Conference. As a senior, he finished with 51 tackles, and he scored 25 touchdowns passing and rushing overall.

He was named First Team All-Shore Defense, and he was selected to play in the Phil Simms North-South All Star Game.

Monmouth was the first school to offer Berry a scholarship, and he felt that the institution was home.

“I was a junior in high school. It was just a family environment. They came to any event I had, and the whole staff was there supporting me. I had offers from Army, Rhode Island, and others,” he shared.

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"Stop This Train" | Jenna Puglisi's Senior Goodbye

Train Puglisis GoodbyeThere is a John Mayer lyric for any and every situation, even graduation.

“I’m so scared of getting older; I’m only good at being young,” from “Stop This Train,” is currently the line that is going through my head on a loop.

How can college already be over? It feels like yesterday that I threw my high school graduation cap into the air, excited to see where life would take me next.

To my parents, thank you for getting me here. You always remind me to stop and take a breath.

Mom, I am the Rory to your Lorelai, always. Thank you for being my personal assistant and best friend. Dad, I’m proud to be your Pearl.

To Spencer, my Jean-Ralphio, you are the coolest dude I know. There is no one who makes me laugh as hard as you do, and I’m so lucky that you’re always there to cheer me up.

To the rest of my amazing family, the Degnan’s and the Pugs, thank you for loving me and believing in me. Gram and Pop, everything that I do is for and because of you. I miss you. I love you.

My friends are an extension of my family and a support group that I would be nothing without. (Sorry in advance for not listing everyone, but I love you all dearly.)

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The King of the Monsters: Spotlight on Jason Aquino

King Of Monsters SpotlightSome people collect coins, others collect sports memorabilia, but few collect giant radioactive reptiles with atomic breath. Jason Aquino, a senior English student, has a collection of figures depicting monsters from the Godzilla franchise.

The majority of his collection showcases different iterations of the “King of the Monsters,” but his collection also includes other beasts such as King Ghidorah, Rodan, and Mothra, just to name a few. Jason estimates his collection to include about 60 figures in total, and the largest figure in his collection towers at three feet tall.

At about a foot tall, Aquino’s newest figure of Godzilla from the movie Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. stands with outstretched claws, while showing off its menacing array of bone-white dorsal plates that poke through its back. The figure cost him $75 and was manufactured by Bandai, one of the largest manufacturers of collectible figures. 

Describing his newest purchase, which he bought on eBay, Aquino said, “I like it because it’s one of the few figures I have where Godzilla has lightning-bolt shaped dorsal plates that generate blue atomic breath, because that shape is usually associated with orange breath. It’s unique.”

Zoe Saufler, a senior graphic design student, commented on his personality. She said, “Jason’s hilarious but also very introspective. He has a kind-hearted personality. One minute we’ll be joking about YouTube videos and the next we could be talking about theoretical universes and its effects.”

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Alumna Spotlight on Tara Ackaway

Spotlight Tara AckawayMonmouth alumna Tara Ackaway, CEO and founder of Social Wise Communications, has been featured in ForbesWomen on Thursday, March 28.

At 22, Ackaway, a former communication student, founded Social Wise, a boutique public relations company, after graduating Monmouth. After four years, her team now works with small businesses, non-profit organizations, authors, entrepreneurs and celebrities. Her portfolio includes projects with Bravo, E! News and MTV.

Prior to the launch of Social Wise Communications, Ackaway was interning in the city balancing three high-profile entertainment public relations and social media gigs. When she was a senior at Monmouth, Ackaway got an internship with the Bravo series “The Real Housewives of New York City.”

“I was a student during all of this. I was going in and out of the city (NYC) almost daily,” she said. “Everyone wants immediate results. I knew working this amount of hours and this high stress pressured job would lead me to something. I didn’t know what it would be but I knew it would lead me to this bigger, amazing experience.”

“I did a lot of networking in the city. I talked with a lot of people. I made a business card with my name on it and I handed it out all over the place,” she continued.

Ackaway said, “It wasn’t all glamorous. And, I appreciated the work ethic required to complete those not-so-glamorous responsibilities.”

John Morano, a professor of journalism, had Ackaway as a student and her company now represents him as his publicist.

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Student Activities Spotlight on Eta Sigma Gamma

Student Activities ESG 1Excellence, professionalism, and health promotion. Those are some of the values of Eta Sigma Gamma (ESG), the National Health Education Honorary.

At Monmouth University, ESG holds events for health education and community service such as CPR certification training, blood drives, and donations to various organizations.

“Through many of these events, we give our members the opportunity to propel into careers in health,” said Justin Badamo, a senior health studies student and Vice President of ESG. Badamo’s passion for health bleeds into his involvement in ESG.

“This semester, we collected and delivered donations to the Monmouth County SPCA in West Long Branch. The animal shelter was extremely grateful for the much-needed supplies and food, and our members were happy to have participated in such a wonderful event,” Badamo said.

Badamo showcases his enthusiasm for health by leading the organization, promoting health-related activities, and giving back to the community.

The chapter is an embodiment of the hard work and success of health studies students across Monmouth. Being inducted into the accomplished honor society is a path toward new, fulfilling experiences.

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Professor Spotlight on Claude Taylor

Professor Spotlight Claude TaylorClaude E. Taylor is a lecturer of communication and the Advisor-in-Residence for Academic Transition and Inclusion at Monmouth.

A native of Asbury Park, NJ, Taylor was born to his mother Audrey Taylor, a Jamaican immigrant, and father Roosevelt Taylor who was from North Carolina.

Upon graduating Red Bank Catholic High School at 17, he decided to continue his academic and athletic career at West Chester University of Pennsylvania playing football.

“I was not a starter, but our program was coached by legendary PSAC coach Danny Hale, who emphasized that my role on the practice squad was as important as the starting players,” said Taylor.

Taylor only played three out of the four years at West Chester because he was unable to balance academics and athletics. Since he was not a scholarship player, he relied heavily on his education.

“I highly value the student-athlete experience, but it does sometimes call for sacrifices that are hard to make,” Taylor shared.

Taylor graduated from West Chester with a bachelor’s degree in speech communication and a master’s degree in communication studies.

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A Better Life in Guatemala: One Individual at a Time

Better Life GuatemalaWhen I stumbled across an email expounding the details of a course called Guatemala Public Health, taught by Chris Hirschler, Ph.D., I couldn’t help but be drawn to a class that would foster academic success while concurrently stimulating global understanding in a developing country.

I had no idea that this email would lead me to one of the greatest experiences that I have encountered.

For seven weeks, five other students and I prepared for our upcoming travels, reading articles and watching documentaries that would try to prepare us for what we would experience in Guatemala, not realizing that this could not fully prepare us for what we would eventually see, smell, hear, and feel with our own senses.

The curriculum educated us on impoverished conditions, the prevalence of violence, and taught us the history of the country, enabling us to understand the present.

Our class consisted of six students, as well as Ekaterina Bronshteyn, an adjunct instructor of music and theatre. Additionally, Jeffrey Wilhelms, a lecturer of sociology at Rutgers, joined us on our journey. Our group was welcomed with open arms by Archie and Jacky Contreras of A Better Life Foundation Guatemala.

Together, we constructed bunk beds, picked up trash within a cemetery located in Chichicastenango, assembled water filtration systems, hiked up the Picaya volcano, toured a private hospital, and met with Selaine d’Amborosi, a representative of a nonprofit animal welfare program, Ayuda.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu