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Last updateWed, 21 Feb 2018 2pm

Features

It's the Write Thing to do: Why Writing is Important

Writing ImportantWhy is it important to write?

The importance of writing is simple yet equally complex. Just one of the reasons a person might write is for personal satisfaction or fulfillment. Writing is an art form, meaning that it can be used to release and portray feelings that might go otherwise unsaid.

I am a believer in the concept of keeping a journal and documenting personal thoughts. It is healthy to make note of how you feel daily. Keeping record of these moments is important to keep an open and clear mind. 

Granted, it can be very difficult to find time for writing when we have grown accustomed to moving so fast. We, as a society, sometimes forget to take a moment and appreciate all we have, let alone document it. 

Deadlines, exams, work, studying, the list is endless. As college students, we can barely find the time to breathe. Everyone struggles with finding the time to stop and write, but taking every moment you can get makes it worth it. Whether it be scribbling down a few sentences before bed, or writing a note in my phone as I walk to class, writing down a passing thought is pacifying. 

Disclaimer, you don’t need to be a poetic genius to write! Especially if you are writing for pleasure, simply let your mind articulate your words to the page or your screen.

Lorna Schmidt, Director of Advising for the department of communication said, "People will miss out, when they go back through genealogy, handwritten notes, even business notes, and the truly personalized."

Alexa Laspada, a sophomore accounting student said, "Basic writing skills are important in the world today because much of the world consists of communication through technology such as e-mails and messaging. Whether you are looking to apply for a job or to secure a promotion, proper grammatical skills or required to sound knowledgeable. The basic skills of writing are also needed to write in a comprehensive and easy to understand manner. Using professionalism and getting our point across in the same way can be challenging without basic writing skills."

On the other hand, writing is also important for other reasons. Life is short and things happen in the blink of an eye. Like a photograph, writing can capture a moment in time. Writing allows you to descriptively remember details that would be forgotten otherwise. 

Unfortunately, the world we live in today relies heavily on assumptions and miscommunication; these common miscommunications can be noticed in several different environments. For example, in relationships, a partner might not vocalize his/her emotions in the right ways or even at all. Fear of being judged or harshly interpreted can cause a person to withhold the things they want to say.

Even in the workforce, adults are trained not to vocalize their everyday thoughts for professional reasons. When the only option is to physically write down your thoughts, I urge you to do so. Simple pen and paper can release the stress of any weight you may carry around on your shoulders. After all, writing is one of the most powerful tools.

How might this involve writing skills? 

Aaron Furgason, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Communication said, "The world would be a terrible, terrible place without the New York Times because of its long, firmly deep thinking writing on a trillion different topics. During the Super Bowl I watched commercials and read the New York Times when the game came back on; it took the whole game to finish. I read the paper every Sunday."

“In today’s information overload world, it’s vital to communicate clearly, concisely and effectively…” according to MindTools online. Concerning professionalism, writing skills are essential to be taken seriously and properly understood. It does not matter which field you choose to enter, the ability to write is a key tool in succeeding. 

Employers even admit to this. After all, “No one wants to do business with individuals who cannot express themselves clearly, cannot write accurately, or would not be able to listen effectively to instructions and briefs,” according to the University of East London. 

From a professional standpoint, the ability to write is more than important. Employers will assume that you have the basic necessary writing skills upon hiring. 

Why are writing skills necessary today, even more so than ever before?

This can be answered in two ways. From a professional standpoint, we need an assumed set of writing skills to properly communicate our plans and goals. Improper structure in an email to coworkers, for example, is highly frowned upon. 

It is undoubtable that tools like spellcheck allow us to become lazy and forgetful in regards to writing. In general, people cannot be fully blamed for the decrease in writing skills. A lot of the improper writing habits have developed from the machines and technology we use and rely on every day.

I also think we fail to utilize every aspect of our IPhone, unless it involves Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Every IPhone has a built-in note app that serves as a notebook on the go. So, if pen and paper is too outdated for your liking, remember that you can keep journals stored in the cloud! (iCloud, that is…)

Again, I urge you to write at any given chance. Remember that life goes by fast and things go forgotten. Writing offers a look inside how we might have felt at a specific point in time. Keep a tiny notebook paired with a pencil in your purse, on your nightstand, or even in your car. After all, you never want to miss a fleeting moment to write down a thought.

PHOTO TAKEN by Nicole Riddle

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