Last updateWed, 28 Feb 2018 12pm


Exoskeleton Gives Paraplegics a Chance to Walk

Ekso-Bionics Brings Freedom to Wheelchair-Bound

Most of us took our first steps as toddlers as we were watched excitedly by our parents in the comfort of our homes. As the days passed, we gained experience and walked upright, pushed our chests out and marveled at our own accomplishment.

As the days turned to years, some lost that privilege and were told by the doctor that we could not walk again. Car accidents, construction accidents surfing accidents, and skiing accidents among a myriad of others have robbed them of the freedom of walking free.

Recently, that freedom has not only been restored, but has been revamped like never before.

A collaboration of professionals in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, programming and medicine in the Californiabased

Ekso Bionics, has given people in wheelchairs a second opportunity at taking their first steps. Ekso is a bionic exoskeleton that allows paraplegics to stand up from their wheelchairs and walk upright. Armed with four motors and fifteen electrical sensors, the battery powered and ready-to-wear device allows the patient, according to, to walk over ground with a natural gait, assisted by advanced balance and positioning systems. In only five minutes, the patient can transfer from his or her wheelchair to the device with minimal assistance, and on their own with experience.

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Our Neighbors in Sandy Hook

The Harbor Seals of Point Pleasant

The mackerels were flying back and forth, bubbles were being blown and fins were flapping. Then, I got a kiss from a harbor seal; a soft, moist velvet kiss on my forehead. So excuse me if I seem like a sucker for these guys, because I am.

But my story doesn’t start with the kiss. It starts at Sandy Hook on a January morning during low tide. A warm day for that time of year, the sun seemed to rise just for me, following my footsteps as I walked towards the sand bar on the bay side of Sandy Hook. T he sunbeams warmed me and I left my jacket unbuttoned.

New Jersey’s beaches in the winter are beautiful, unbeknownst to most local residents or seasonal tourists. Sandy Hook is no exception. While the “bennies” are back home in the north, hundreds of seals take to the sandbars and seas. The most common species is the Western Atlantic Harbor seal, but grey, harp, and hooded seals are also seen. All of these are categorized under the mammal subheading known as pinniped, which means “fin-footed” in Latin.

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What to Know About Living Off-Campus

As students move up in their college careers, many develop a desire to live off-campus. While many look forward to making the transition from on-campus to off, there are responsibilities and things to keep in mind that go into living on your own.

Finding a Rental

There are multiple things to consider when looking for a rental. Numerous and varied housing options are offered to students and those should determine what type of housing they want before contacting landlords and realtors.

One of the options is to live in an apartment building; which there are many large and small apartment buildings in the Monmouth University area. Apartment buildings generally contain studio to two bedroom units. Houses are another option where you can find single, two, and three bedroom houses in areas surrounding the University.

“I like living in a house because there is more space to move around,” said junior David DeSimone.

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Blinded by the Light: The Real Cost of Indoor Tanning


It’s burning up more and more by the second. The bright lights blind you, but you don’t want to place the eye protectors across your eyelids in fear of leaving spots or an uneven tone on your face. You lie there, completely at peace with music playing above your head, outside the box. Twelve minutes pass, the lights come down and immediately, you feel a rush of cool air as the heat vanishes. As you’re getting dressed, you catch a glance of yourself in the mirror, let out a sigh and smile, thinking it’s all worth it. Even in the early weeks of spring, you’re magically walking around with a sun-kissed tan as if you just came back from the Bahamas. Fact check: that invigorating feeling of confidence may not last as long as the chemicals in your body will.

Indoor tanning is said to be as danger as it a luxury for people. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, more than one million people tan in tanning salons. Moreover, 70 percent of patrons are women aged 16 to 29, ages that include college students.

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Former Hawks Take Over Seaside Park and Become Nostalgic of MU

Two Hawks, two generations and two winnings for the Seaside Park Council. That is the story for alums Robert Matthies, class of 1972, and David Nicola, class of 2000. Both individuals ran for the Seaside Park Council this past November; Matthies was elected as Mayor and Nicola as Councilman. With just a few months under their belts in their new positions, the two former Hawks had some time to discuss serving Seaside Park, as well as to recall some fond memories on the Monmouth campus.

This is not the first time Mayor Matthies has represented Seaside Park in an executive capacity. He was Mayor from 2004 to 2007, chose to take a few years off, and has now reprised his role. “I ran again because of the strong support of the community. I’ve been in elected council for 20 years, and I’ve always felt obligated to my community, and if that means being in a leadership role, then so be it,” Matthies says.

As Mayor, he is Chief Executive Officer of the borough representing citizens of the Seaside Park community. Although the town’s population is 1,500 in the offseason, there are around 40,000 full-time residents in the summer – which does not include visitors to the beaches.

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Twins: Double is Better

What it’s Like to be a Twin

They always say two is better than one, and boy, are they right. Double the trouble, double the noise, double the mess, just double everything. When one thinks of twins, some first thoughts may be that they finish each other’s sentences, read each other’s minds, and even dress in coordinating outfits. But beyond the surface of similar features and mannerisms lies many other characteristics that aren’t displayed straight out of the gate.

To those who grew up with large age gaps in between siblings, twins are born with a built in playmate. Michael Pearson, senior communication major and a twin, said, “I was never bored growing up, because my brother was always around. We didn’t have to play video games all the time because there was always someone to play catch with or play sports against. Also, my brother and I were always on a team against our parents during arguments, so it was good to have backup,” he said.

A common question asked of twins is, “Do you ever get bothered by being associated with each other?” Josh Lewis, senior business major, said, “When I was growing up, I went through periods of time when I hated being associated with my twin, Ben. I always tried to be independent and never liked being referred to as one of ‘the twins.’ Now though, I don’t mind it.” Lewis also said that since both his brother and himself have gone to college, they have actually grown closer than they were before.

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A Separation from Divorce

How Divorce Affects Students and Society


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the current divorce rate in our country is up to 50 percent. That means that when a couple gets married, there is a 50 percent chance that the marriage will end in a divorce.

Alan Foster, sociology professor, said that part of the problem with divorce is that it is too easy to get married in this country.

“You don’t have to take a test and all you need is a couple of bucks and a license. We have a lot of freedom in this country to marry anybody we choose, which could be part of the reason why people get married for the wrong reasons,” said Foster.

Foster also suggested that maybe there is a need for some sort of a pre-marital test to see if people are prepared. People need to make sure they’re with the right person, they have enough money, and they are ready and mature enough to handle being married.

When a family goes through a divorce, they must experience the pain that both sides go through and the sadness that is felt if children are involved. They no longer get to grow up in a normal household, but instead have to live with one parent and see the other one from time to time. It changes everything for everyone involved and can leave a lasting effect. 

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A Living Legend of Business

Meet Dr. Frederick Kelly, Former Dean of the Business School

Living Legend BusinessDr. Frederick Kelly, Dean for the Leon Hess Business School from July 2001 to July 2010, had not always planned to be working at the University. He originally started pursuing an interest in teaching when he was pursuing his doctorate.

“I was planning to return to a career in banking when I finished my doctorate,” Kelly explained, “however, there weren’t openings available at the time and so I started teaching to earn some money while I waited for a job to open up. I found I really liked teaching and decided to continue it as a career choice. I later moved into administration, which I likewise enjoyed immensely.”

Kelly was born in New York City and attended Manhattan College, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in economics. Following his undergraduate work, he went to earn a Ph. D in economics, finance and international business at Columbia University.

Before joining the University community, Kelly was Dean of the Gabelli School of Business at Roger Williams University in Bristol and Providence, Rhode Island. Kelly also has served as Professor of Finance and Dean of the School of Business at Seton Hall University’s Stillman School of Business, Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Silberman College of Business Administration, and the University of Baltimore’s Merrick School of Business. While in Rhode Island, Kelly also served as the Economic Forecast Manager for the state under the auspices of the New England Economic Project. Kelly also has served as an administrator and faculty member at Montclair State College, Medger Evers College of the City University of New York, and Adelphi University.

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Electronic Fields Versus Cancer

Electronic FieldsAlmost everyone has been touched by cancer in some shape or form through its mark on a family member, friend, or loved one. Recently, modern science has armed physicians with a new fourth option for treatment against cancer in addition to surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, called tumor treating fields therapy (TTF therapy).

When somatic cells divide, they traverse through a specific phase in their life cycle called mitosis, a process policed by myriad regulators. In cancer, certain aberrations arisen from genetic mutations deregulate cell division and cause the parent cell to divide not into just two daughter cells and cease dividing but into two deregulated daughter cells that simply don’t know when to stop dividing.

This leads into a benign tumor which can be remediated by surgery; but if it persists and continues growing uncontrollably, it exacerbates into a malignant neoplasm, otherwise known as cancer. When the malignant neoplasm gains access to the bloodstream, it will metastasize and invade proximal and distal parts of the body, leading collectively to adverse symptoms too many to count.

Tumor cells pass through metaphase, part midway through mitosis in which all of the parent cell’s genetic material is medially aligned prior to splitting into two daughter cells. The polar nature of the proteins forming the spindles holding this apparatus together allows us to view these proteins as a system of dipoles, which are objects with partial positive and negative charges.

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Need Some Career Advising? Visit Jeff Mass

Former University Graduate Works as Job Placement Coordinator

Jeff MassIt is always a success when University students find a job that they love, and then come back to the University to share their knowledge with current students. This is the case for Jeff Mass, the Job Placement Coordinator for Career Services.

Mass graduated from the University in 2004 with a degree in Business Administration. After graduating, Mass worked as a recruitment consultant for Telcordia Technologies in Piscataway, NJ. He stayed there for a year before moving on to be executive recruiter for Snelling Staffing Services in New York City. After four years of employment, he came back to the University, and has been working here for almost two years.

“Both jobs entailed full life cycle recruiting for various hiring managers,” said Mass. This means that he worked with every aspect in the hiring process, from reviewing resumes to placing people into positions within the company.

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You Too, Can Save the Planet

Easy Ways to Live Green

Save the PlanetNow inhabited by nearly seven billion people, the planet is constantly facing human activity that negatively contributes to the environment. However, there are plenty of ways people can become more environmentally aware and do more to better sustain the planet.

According to, the term “green living” refers to “any actions or activity that results in a positive impact on the environment so that the planet can continue to support future generations.” In order to live green, people simply need to make better choices in their daily lives, such as “choosing paper instead of plastic grocery bags, recycling newspapers and soda cans, driving a fuel efficient car, or eating organically grown food.”

Dr. Kenneth Stunkel, Professor of history and co-author of Economic Super Powers and the Environment: The United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan, said, “Being environmentally conscious is a matter of understanding the fact that I’m a biological organism dependent for my well-being on natural systems, such as fresh water, fertile soil, a healthy atmosphere, and other living creatures.”

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Contact Information

The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151