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Last updateThu, 14 Mar 2019 12pm

Features

Until Divorce Do Us Part

divorce-decreeLife has that funny way of throwing things at you when you least expect them. From the positives of a new-found love to a highend job promotion, to the contrasting negatives of a car accident or a sudden death, all are surprises that capture individuals day by day.

What happens, though, when that very surprise isn’t much of a surprise at all and you see it looming overhead far before it decides to strike? Or better yet what if that sudden curveball is one that sticks with you, refusing to leave no matter how hard you will it to?

For more and more people in this age that very thing is occurring, grasping them in a suffocating clutch and affecting more than merely them, but those around them as well. The name of their unforeseen marvel? Divorce.

At this point, everyone has heard the stories; how divorce rates are higher than ever and about how half of the marriages who complete the glitzy, happy ever-after wedding ceremony will end in a court room. It’s not an ideal position to be in, it isn’t grand, and it most certainly is not something worth exploiting for personal gainthough as some television dramas will tell you is a foolish claim, get rich quick and all that.

However, as much as we know about the sad reality of the escalating rates in marriage separations, we as a society have become desensitized to them entirely, something that sophomore Victoria Hammil notes from personal experience.

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Young Kids Facing Grown-up Illnesses

kids--illnessesAre kids growing up too fast? Dr. Michelle Fowers says too many are.

“I think all the time about kids with grown-up illnesses,” says Fowers, a pediatrician at Baylor Medical Center in Irving, Texas.

Societal pressures, poor nutrition, and inadequate or too narrowly focused exercise are causing serious health problems for kids, experts say. These problems include obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, repetitive stress injuries, anxiety, depression, Type 2 diabetes and eating disorders many of them striking at younger ages than they did a generation ago.

“There are so many things that make kids grow up faster than they should,” Fowers says. She cites exposure to inappropriate material on television and online, marketers who encourage them to dress or act older than they are, pressures to compete in organized activities before they’re emotionally or physically ready.

That’s why she advises parents to slow childhood down by limiting screen time and eating and playing together as a family. It’s advice she follows herself as a mother of a 4-year-old girl and 7-year-old boy. “You have to allow time for them to be kids,” she says. “You try to make your home a stable and emotionally safe place where your child feels loved and can get away from the pressures of the world. You need to offer healthy foods and schedule family time to go outside and play or to run around the house and goof off. I think there’s a lot of creativity that comes with unstructured play.”

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Remaining Calm is the Ticket

features_copWith the holidays upon us, drivers have to be more cautious with icy road conditions, snow removal and turbulent winds. But say you look in the rearview mirror and the dreadful red and blue flashing lights are signaling you to pull over? A wave of panic advances, your palms become instant sweat pools and you have forgotten the proper protocol from your junior year Driver’s Education class. Fret not, despite your ironic “keep calm and carry on” tee.

Patrolman Officer Vaccaro of Ocean Township Police Department notes that your first step should be to, “Pull into a well lit area, off to the right side of the roadway, clearly out of the traffic lane.” After which your window should be fully rolled down with the engine off. If it’s night time, the interior light should be turned on as well. After eight years of service, Vaccaro adds that drivers are most commonly forgetting this step, which adds further suspicion to the situation.

Once stopped keep flashers on and remember the 10 and 2 rule, where you first learned to place your hands on the steering wheel. Placing hands in this position signals that you have control and are respectful to the patrolling officer.

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Superstorm Sandy’s Unprecedented Impact

aftermathsandyIn the last few weeks, a new page was written in the history books of the Jersey Shore, marked under the shadows of wreckage and havoc from the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

Though only a category one hurricane, Sandy devastated the homes of tens of thousands of people in the tri-state area, leaving unprecedented damage Superstorm Sandy’s Unprecedented Impact across the shorefronts.

Atlantic City, known for its boardwalk, beaches, and blackjack, became an extension of the Atlantic Ocean as seaweed and debris circulated the kneedeep murky water, covering the shorefront streets and beyond. The property damage there was pretty extensive, according to Mayor Lorenzo Langford who said in an article in CNN, “I’m happy to report that the human damage, if you will, has been minimal.”

Governor Christie said he saw the damage left behind by Hurricane Sandy as “overwhelming” according to CNN.

“We will rebuild it. No question in my mind, we’ll rebuild it,” Christie said. “But for those of us who are my age, it won’t be the same. It will be different because many of the iconic things that made it what it was are now gone and washed in to the ocean.”

“I think many of us underestimated the damage this storm would cause,” said Paula Burns-Ricciardi, history professor. In all my years, I have never seen a storm of this magnitude followed within days by a snowstorm and I am heartsick over the damage Sandy has done to so many people and to our treasured landscape. I am impressed, however, at how this tragic event has moved people to come together to help one another.”

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Real World Emergency Journalism

A Personal Look Inside Hurricane Coverage for The Asbury Park Press


ginaResidents across New Jersey have been in a need-to-know state of mind over the past few weeks due to Hurricane Sandy and newspapers have been the main source of information. In the world of journalism, it is up to local staff writers to provide their very neighborhoods with such news.

Many daily newspapers across the east coast still update their readers on conditions in the surrounding areas. A prime example of this is The Asbury Park Press.

Gina Columbus, staff writer for The Asbury Park Press explained that many of the newspaper’s staff writers were not only journalists, but residents of the shore areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. Like many residents, Columbus could not go into work immediately following the storm, but that did not mean she wasn’t working. “They sent us out into the neighborhoods we were living in to take pictures. We used our phones since we didn’t have power and sent everything to our editors. They kind of understood,” said Columbus.

The first official assignment Columbus was given regarding the hurricane was at Brick Hospital. She covered the overflow of emergency patients and the mobile emergency unit. Still, Columbus said, The Asbury Park Press is mostly covering local updates on hurricane damage.

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Frankenstorm is the New Boogie Man

features-frankenstormDo you remember some of your first Halloween costumes? Were you dressed as a black cat like I was? Or maybe you were a Jack O’Lantern? Better yet a wicked witch?

“Me and my friends were ninja turtles. We handmade our turtle shells, it was awesome,” said senior Taylor Manthey.

Well, hold onto those memories because I’m sure every youngster will remember the year 2012 when Halloween wasn’t celebrated with classmates or allowed kids to go door to door as normal.

On October 31st, Governor Christie’s Administration signed an executive order postponing the night of mischief for trick- or – treaters to Monday, November 5th. It’s a good thing too because candy was scarce in shut-down stores and many already consumed fist- fulls of chocolate well before Wednesday.

Ellen Jensen, music teacher for St. Rose Grammar School in Freehold says, “I just feel so bad for the kids, they have been looking forward to coming to school in their costumes for weeks.”

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Lights Out, Phones On

In the Midst of Hurricane Disaster, One of Our Biggest Concerns is ‘Will My Battery Die?’


features-hurricane-technologyAfter two long weeks, the University gets back on its feet as students, faculty, and staff members finally return to their daily routines and fall back in to a s tate of normalcy.

Many would agree that the destruction from Hurricane Sandy was unexpected and underestimated, especially by those who faced up to twelve days with out heat or electricity. Jersey Central Power & Light Company (JCP&L) configured power outage maps that reported over 969,000 homes lost power in the state of New Jersey. No TV, no computer, no IPhone charging; just a deck of cards, board games and a radio.

“By day four I was already loosing it. I couldn’t work, no businesses had power, I couldn’t even do my homework because I needed my laptop and Wi-Fi,” said senior Lea Callahan. She wasn’t the only one who felt frustrated from Sandy’s wrath. Student Jamie Cardullo, 19, agreed, “having a few days off to spend time with your family and be unglued from your phone, your job, and Facebook for once was cool and all. I guess I started getting used to it, but that’s when I started to realize how impossible and inconvenient everything was without power.”

This was the worst natural disaster Jersey had ever endured. Students and faculty were nowhere near prepared for the University to be closed for almost two entire weeks.

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November is Blindness Awareness Month

features-blindnessNovember is a month that is not only dedicated to honoring our country’s veterans and the Thanksgiving holiday, but as of two years ago it is also Blindness Awareness Month.

People with low vision are able to receive a variety of services that can help them be successful in life. One of the organizations offering these services is the New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired which assists with helping people with limited vision achieve independence through providing them with tools such as books on CD, or a Closed Circuit Television to enlarge print size. “We currently have six students enrolled at Monmouth from our agency. One of our biggest challenges is assisting those who are visually impaired, (partially sighted) because on the outside they may not appear to have an obvious difficulty,” said case worker Diana Cortez

It is very important to understand that many people with blindness and low vision have been successful as a result of these supports. Education Leadership Professor Doctor Terri Peters had the opportunity to express these benefits at a panel.

Last month four panelists during a presentation to the Foundation Fighting Blindness were people who have successful careers despite living from limited vision or blindness. In attendance were people with professions such as lawyer, disability rights advocate and a film editor.

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The Dawn of Quantum Computing

features-quantum-computingIf you have glanced at specifications for the typical personal computer over the past few years you have probably noticed the exponential rate by which many of the computer’s components are improving.

This trend is the result of an observation made in 1965 by the cofounder of Intel, Gordon Moore, known as Moore’s Law which states that the number of transistors per square inch on an integrated circuit will double every two years, according to intel.com.

Transistors are semiconductors which are the fundamental components of most electronic devices. They can act as amplifiers by controlling a large electrical output signal with changes to a small input signal (much the same way as a small amount of effort is used to allow a faucet to release a large volume of water). Transistors can also act as switches that can open and close very quickly to regulate the current flowing through an electrical circuit.

An analysis of personal computer specifications of the norm over the past decade showed an increase in RAM from 256 MB to 4 GB and in hard-drive space from 50 GB to 500 GB. With respect to storage capacity, we went from storing a few word processed documents on 3 ½ floppy discs (R.I.P.) with 720 KB and with the later ones 1.4 MB in the 90s and early 2000s, respectively.

Then CD-Rs came with upwards of 700 MB storage space, giving way to DVD-Rs with 4.7 GB, and eventually dl-DVD-Rs with 8.5 GB. The recent Blu-Ray discs boast a storage capacity of upwards of 25 GB for single layer and 50 GB for dl-Blu-Ray – capable of holding upwards of 9 hours of high definition video – a 3.7 percent increase in storage capacity over that of floppy discs.

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Halloween’s Most Mischievous Deviant is Sandy

features-sandyIn the current college students’ generation, Halloween has always come with some mischief and each year authorities take precautions to keep everyone safe. This Halloween, however, mischief’s name was Sandy.

Before Governor Chris Christie’s rescheduling of Halloween from October 31 to November 5, MUPD planned for a normal holiday centered around costumes, parties and celebrations. William McElrath, Chief of Police for MUPD, stressed the main concerns for Halloween on campus. As far as Halloween activity on campus, I would say the main safety concern [was] related to the abuse of alcohol and all of the safety issues which result from it,” said McElrath. “Generally speaking, our campus has not experienced any upswing in negative activity on recent Halloweens. Students should [always] be reminded that if they are old enough to drink, and choose to do so, they should drink responsibly and utilize taxis or designated drivers to get around.”

McElrath explains that the same penalties that apply every day are in effect each Halloween.

The most common charges are underage drinking, driving while intoxicated, disorderly persons, etc. and they can also be charged under the Monmouth University Student Code of Conduct if they are in violation.

Students’ plans were deferred thanks to Hurricane Sandy taking such a devastating toll.

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Oceanport Family Loses More Than Electricity

features-sandy2Hannah Stone, 17, a resident of Oceanport, NJ evacuated her home on October 29 due to increasing winds approaching the East Coast. Her family fled to safer grounds as her waterfront home in Oceanport was issued a mandatory evacuation. However, by Tuesday morning, Hurricane Sandy had already engulfed the Stone’s home and left little behind.

“Only a few neighbors stayed, but nobody had lived quite as close to the water as we did” reports Hannah.

Hannah and her family live approximately five to 10 feet from the Shrewsbury River, resulting in inevitable flooding, and extreme devastation with winds being reported up to 80 mph by the National Hurricane Center.

“We had never anticipated that Hurricane Sandy would have caused so much damage to not only us, but many other families in the Jersey shore area,” said Stone.

However, many decided to stay, claiming that the hurricane would be as minor as Hurricane Irene, which hit the area in August of 2011.

“This was a relatively weak hurricane, but the fact that the storm was a hybrid is what caused all the devastation,” according to Joseph Gleason, local EMT volunteer for West Long Branch.

But what if you woke up on Tuesday and realized that this was a hurricane more comparable to Katrina? Imagine returning to the place you call home only to find your valuables submerged in water.

“I was devastated when I saw my house for the first time. It was so hard looking at something so important so ruined,” says Hannah as she remarks on Sandy’s aftermath.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu