Mon12102018

Last updateMon, 10 Dec 2018 4pm

Lifestyles

You Get What You Give: Practice Gratitude

Practice GratitudeSchedules are busy, time is limited, and stress levels are high. Without noticing, college can instantly become something that strips away our daily gratitude and it can make us forget what is important in our lives.

If there is a loss of gratitude in your life, take proactive steps to embrace the little things that make you smile.

To do this, first, understand the meaning of gratitude. Gratitude is essentially the act of being grateful.

 Instead of just saying what you are grateful for, put it into practice.

Being proactive with this will ultimately turn your life into an overall positive experience.

If you don’t know where to start here are some tips. 

Look at the glass half full.

Think of five things that you normally begrudge.

These can be going to class, waking up early in the morning, or even having to put gas in your car, and write down why you are grateful for them.

For example, you can be grateful for waking up early to go to your 8:30 a.m. classes because it can help you get a jumpstart on your day.

It takes you one step closer to achieving your dream degree.

Writing down uplifting aspects of things you feel to be negative will help you appreciate what you have in your life.

Write it down, or say it out loud.

 Before bed write down in a journal five things that happened during your day in which you are grateful for or five people you are grateful for, and why.

If journaling isn’t your thing, you can even say it out loud.

You may not want to feel crazy for talking to yourself or put in the extra effort when you are just tired, but this experience will be cathartic.

Taking time to realize how great things are can be a sigh of relief if you are feeling the stresses of life.

Now, let us provide a life hack. If writing is your outlet, look up The Five-Minute Journal. It is a great tool that will help you practice gratitude daily that is pre-formatted.

Say thank you.

Part of practicing gratitude is also learning respect.

Throughout your day if you encounter someone who helps you out, serves you food, or even lets you cut in front of them while driving, say “thank you.”

  Letting others know you appreciate them will not only earn you mutual respect, but it will make you feel good inside.

Sam Melillo, a junior communication student offered some insight into how she practices gratitude daily by simply being friendly.

Melillo stated, “I always make sure that I’m polite especially when people go out of their way for me.

If someone holds the door for me, even when I am a few steps back, I say thank you and hold the door for the next person.”

When walking on campus you may notice the lack of people saying “thank you” when a door is held open for them, don’t be that person.

It costs nothing to express your gratitude.

Show yourself some love.

A large part of gratitude is being able to recognize and love the good within you.

To tap into your soul, schedule some alone time with just you.

Spending time alone with yourself will help you learn to appreciate just how much of a boss you are.

 Rebecca Ley, a junior health studies student, chatted about how she makes time for herself while remaining grateful for others.

Ley stated, “I take a walk every morning and think of five different things I’m grateful for.”

Taking time to self-reflect will only help you grow, and when you grow, your gratitude will flourish for the things that helped you within your journey.

Lisa Allocco, an adjunct communication professor dedicates time to herself as well.

Allocco said, “I go to Hatha yoga four times a week, so practicing mindfulness has become a part of my everyday life.”

When you are mindful of yourself, you automatically become aware and mindful of those around you.

Realizing your own limits and feelings will help you be grateful for the personalities and different qualities your friends and family are able to offer to your relationships.

Coming from people who seriously thought the practice of gratitude would have no immediate effects, they can attest for its powers.

Always remember you get back 100 times what you give out, radiate gratitude my friends.

PHOTO TAKEN by Nicole Riddle

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu