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Last updateFri, 22 Jun 2018 4am

Politics

Has Limbaugh Gone Too Far?

Conservative Radio Host Refers to Law Student as “Slut” and “Prostitute”


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In today’s modernized and constantly connected society, being able to captivate an audience’s attention, is no small feat. Conservative talk show host and political commentator Rush Limbaugh has been able to do so. Instead the causation for the audience’s attention stems from brash comments used by Limbaugh to describe 31 year old law student Sandra Fluke and her positioning regarding contraception.

According to an article in the Huffington Post on March 13, Limbaugh had first regarded Fluke as a “slut” and “prostitute” during his radio show after the third year Georgetown law student had been denied the opportunity to speak before a Congressional panel backing the thought of insurers covering the cost of contraception. Professor Michael Phillips-Anderson, a Communications professor at the University states that, “While she was not allowed to testify before the official House committee she did make a statement to the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee. It was those remarks that Limbaugh responded to. Limbaugh’s comments echo those of many criticisms of those seeking greater equality for women throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Women who entered the public sphere were often identified as prostitutes for leaving the private sphere and entering into public discourse.”

As reported in an article in Time Magazine on March 8, ever since the first snubs towards Fluke had been delivered, Limbaugh had ridiculed and released taunting comments regarding Fluke a total of 53 times over the course of three days. Jessica Davis, a freshman, recalls some of the crude mentionings spoken by Limbaugh. “I remember that [Limbaugh] went so far as to say that all women who get contraception should post videos of themselves having sex on the internet as a way of “paying it back” to society. Not only did I find the comment disgusting, but it really made me wonder why anyone would choose to take this guy seriously when he is saying such nasty and immature things about a very serious issue,” says Davis. The very comments had sparked national outrage, resulting in several companies second guessing the relations tying them to Limbaugh’s name.

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Peace Among Enemies

Facebook Sparks Campaign for Peace Between Israel and Iran


03.21.12_Page_09_Image_0001The surmounting tension between Iran’s nuclear program and Israel’s threats of military intervention is driving a deeper rift in other states’ foreign policy agendas, yet it is also driving internal cooperation between citizens of the two conflicting states.

The deepening rift between Israel and Iran is expanding as nuclear tensions become more intense. Other countries’ loyalties are stressed as Israel recently announced that it would pursue military actions against Iran if necessary.

Last Tuesday, British Prime Minister David Cameron and President Obama urged Israel Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, that military action could unveil a variety of consequences.

The United States and Britain both voiced their discouragement early last week, although the United States regards Israel as a strong ally. Britain also cited that military action against Iran would not be helpful at the given time. Britain ambassador, Peter Westmacott told reporters, “We do not regard that as the right way forward in the months to come.”

“The Iranian situation is vital, in terms of trying to demonstrate to the world, and in particular to the Iranians, our continued road of sanctions, the pressure that’s got further to run, and that we’re going to push that as hard as we can,” Cameron told reporters during his most recent trip to the United States. He also went on to discuss that Britain would not support Israel if they pursued military action.

Dr. Saliba Sarsar, Professor of Political Science and Associate Vice President for Global Initiatives commented on the rising frustrations between Iran and Israel. “The way forward is not to conduct policy by aggression or subversive acts whether carried out by states or non-state actors but to engage in serious diplomacy that holds states accountable for their actions. A stable peace results from the security of all, not the dominance of one state over the others.”

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Feeling the Pain at the Pump?

A Look at Who's to Blame for Rising Gas Prices


As gas prices continue to soar the American people are being forced to make decisions that will best suit their financial needs. In a country where prices of everything only seem to go up, gas will be just an additional expenditure that the public will be required to face. As a result of this concern, politicians and government officials keep the high prices of gas as one of their top concerns.

While prices of gas are continuously rising and politics are weighing heavily on consumer’s inability to afford fuel for their cars, they are forced to reevaluate their current cars and look towards smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles.

According to an Associated Press article, “As gas prices rise, Detroit is better prepared with small car. Gas prices are spiking. But this time, Detroit is ready.” The article explains that when gas prices soared in 2008, Detroit’s three U.S. automakers, Ford, General Motors and Chrysler, were struggling. Unlike competitors, they did not have small cars and relied on trucks and SUVs for profits. However, “When gas prices peaked at $4.12 in July of that year, sales from the Big Three (Ford, General Motors and Chrysler) plummeted more than 20 percent. That same month, sales of the fuelsipping Toyota Corolla jumped 16 percent,” the article explained.

In an effort to get better gas mileage on their vehicles consumers are shifting to small cars again. Although, the article said, “Prices have never been as high for this time of year. The price of a gallon of gas is up 46 cents this year to an average of $3.74. Analysts say gas could hit $4.25 by this April.”

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Syrian Violence Becoming International Issue

Continued violence and bloodshed in Syria shows little sign of stopping. The brutal regime of this Middle Eastern country has continued its crackdown on apparent “opposition” groups. The number of people killed during the violence is unknown. Rebel forces estimate 9,000 people have been killed. The government is saying that 2,000 security officers were killed. Citizen journalists and opposition members have given evidence to the contrary showing the attacking has intentionally been going after innocent civilians. YouTube videos and activist accounts have shown government forces shelling buildings of civilians and attacking random people in the street.

Those in the opposition fighting against this repressive regime vow to not stop fighting unless Assad is out of power. The activist named “Danny” whose real name has been hidden because of safety concerns, told CNN ,“The fighting will not stop until Assad is stopped, or all of the activists are dead.” David Wallsh, a PhD student in International Affairs at Tufts University believes that this situation will not end soon. “The Assad regime has an overwhelming military advantage over the opposition, and neither the opposition nor the international community has figured out how to match it.” Al-Assad is a member of the minority Alawite population in Syria. Alawite is a religious outshoot of Shiite Islam. According to CNN, the government began attacking the majority Sunni antigovernment protesters.

The world cannot be silent on this issue; innocent people are dying in Syria. Aid workers cannot get through to help the hundreds of people at risk because the government is turning them away. The Assad regime is trying to hide the atrocities going on in the embroiled country from the rest of the world.

Fortunately, The U.N. Human Rights council recently condemned the crackdown. Enormous international pressure from member nations of the Arab League has been put on the government of Syria to stop the senseless violence. This has not stopped Assad, who is still ramping up attacks on his own people.

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Will Super Tuesday Be Super for Romney and Santorum?

Will Super Tuesday Could Become Crucial to Winner of the Republican Nomination


Mitt Romney won the Arizona Republican primary by a wide margin. Romney was also reported to have initially won his home state of Michigan over challenger Rick Santorum by three percentage points, however after a recount it was called a tie. This led to the two candidates splitting the delegates.

While this is not the outcome Mitt Romney had hoped for, it is still a promising result for him going into Super Tuesday.

With the tremendous amount of mistakes he is making it is understandable why he is still struggling to become the clear front-runner in this race. While his win on Tuesday was good for his campaign, he’ll have to kick it up a notch and prove to voters in the Super Tuesday states that he is the candidate that is capable and prepared to defeat Barack Obama in a general election. Political Science major Alexandria Todd responded, “I think Romney will ride the wave of momentum he gathered from his victories in Arizona and Michigan.”

Rick Santorum has proven to be more than just a dark horse, making every step of this race a struggle for the Romney camp. From what looked like a clearcut loss for Santorum actually turned out to yield big gains and definitely improve his chances come March 6th. Dr. Joseph Patten, Chair of the Political Science Department stated, “Santorum seems to be wounded after making a few political missteps in past weeks. As Romney’s main competitor this will be crucial.”

Controversy was bred in Michigan, when the Santorum campaign circulated automated calls appealing to Democrats to cross party lines and vote against Romney in the open primary. While Romney still has a relatively safe lead, what Santorum was able to do cannot be overlooked. Santorum took half of the delegates from Romney’s home state. Santorum may be able to garner solid support from states like Ohio, which has one of the highest delegate counts of 66. According to a recent NBC News/Marist poll, Santorum has a slight lead on Romney by about two percentage points. He also has a commanding lead in Oklahoma with about 42 percent. Romney currently stands at third place in the state.

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Political Debate: Should the United States Get Involved with Aid to Yemen?

Side 1: The U.S. Should Give Aid to Yemen as a Form of Protection


Currently in Yemen, protests and government instability has allowed Al-Qaeda to take over cities in the southern part of the country, particularly the port of Aden where 140,000 barrels of oil pass through every day. National Counterterrorism Center Director Michael Leiter has called Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula or ‘AQAP’ the biggest threat to the U.S. Homeland. The attempted bombing of U.S. flight 253 over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009 marked a shift in terrorist activity, since the attack came from Yemen, and not central Al - Qaeda leadership in South Asia. Most importantly, however, may be the scary possibility of a potential nuclearized AQAP. According to Larry J. Arbuckle, a Navy Lieutenant, Al-Qaeda could obtain nuclear weapons. The problem has been that they have not had enough financing to be able to do so yet. AQAP taking over Yemen and gaining influence in the region can possibly lead to them obtaining a nuclear weapon. President Obama said in 2011 that if Al-Qaeda obtained nuclear weapons they would have “no compunction” of using them. According to Obama, “The single biggest threat to U.S. security, both short-term, medium-term and longterm, would be the possibility of a terrorist organization obtaining a nuclear weapon.” Stopping Al-Qaeda in Yemen needs to be a top priority for the American government.

In addition to Al-Qaeda, the United States have moral obligations to the women in Yemen. According to the Yemeni Secretary of Health, women have barely any rights in Yemen currently; they are arrested arbitrarily for “immoral” acts such as smoking, adultery, or eating in a restaurant with a “boyfriend.” Women also do not have the ability to marry who they please. If a woman wants to get married she must get the permission of a man in her family, if she has no male relatives she must go to a judge. Women in Yemen have a one-in-three chance of being able to read and write. Women have a one-in-five chance of being attended by a mid-wife when giving birth, as well as a one in 39 chance of dying while giving birth. As the woman is the primary caregiver of children, if the mother dies the child has an increased risk of dying shortly thereafter. There is no law in Yemen stating how old a woman must be before she can get married, girls as young as 12 find themselves with a husband.

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Student Performs Study About Women’s Role in Politics

Prior to the year 1920, women were barred from voting or holding public office despite desperate pleas such as Abigail Adams’ famous line, “Please, remember the ladies!” Slowly, progress was made and women can now be found at every level of the U.S. government including the Supreme Court. It is vital for women’s voices to be heard in our halls of legislation. Nevertheless, Monmouth’s aspiring female lawmakers will be facing an uphill battle when trying to step into the political arena after graduation.

In spite of recent progress, women still only comprise about 24 percent of our state legislatures, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. The percentages of female legislators are high in some states while others have with low female representation. This begs the question: why do some states have higher percentages of female legislators than others? The answer lies in each state’s education levels, religious views, and political ideologies. In order to further investigate this issue, a regression analysis study under the guidance of Dr. Joseph Patten, Chair of Political Science and Dr. Thomas Lamatsch, Assistant Director of the Polling Institute, was conducted.

The results of this study were groundbreaking in the political research field, uncovering a direct correlation between state educational levels and the percentages of female legislators in each state. Education was the main factor contributing to this issue making it the study’s most significant finding. Patten believes that education has a significant impact on voter participation. “The level of education a person has is the most important predictor as to whether a person will vote or engage in our political process,” Patten said. The data clearly indicated that as a state’s percentage of college graduates increased, the state’s percentage of female legislators increased as well. This was as expected considering voter turnout is significantly higher among college graduates.

Gender came into play as previous studies have proven that voter turnout is higher among women than men, and according to a 2009 Gallop poll, “41 percent of women identify themselves as Democrats.” It is these liberal leaning females who come out to the polls in droves to cast their votes on behalf of female candidates they believe will better represent them on women’s issues. All of which indicate the more educated the voter, the higher a state’s percentage of female representation.

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Why Students Should Know About the Supreme Court

us-supreme-courtThe Supreme Court of the United States of America is one of the three branches of government. There are eight associate justices and one chief justice. The Supreme Court has been in existence since the Judiciary Act of 1789. It became an official organization in February of 1790. Their two primary duties are to interrupt the Constitution and settle disputes between states.

The Supreme Court was established from Article III of the Constitution. This branch’s objective was unknown at first, aside from keeping a legal check on the other two branches of government. The Supreme Court gained its power in the landmark case Marbury v. Madison. This case was about how James Madison attempted to stop last minute appointments by outgoing President John Adams. William Marbury was appointed by Adams and Congress right before Thomas Jefferson was to take over as President. James Madison saw this as unconstitutional. At the conclusion of the case, the Supreme Court ruled four to zero saying that Marbury should be granted his position but it was not up to the Court to force Madison to give it to him. This case was historic because it gave the Court the power to overrule an act of Congress based on the Constitution.

A case can end up before the Supreme Court in two ways. It is either through original jurisdiction or appellate jurisdiction. Original jurisdiction means that the Supreme Court is the only court to hear the case. Appellate jurisdiction means the Supreme Court is hearing a case once heard by a lower court and can either affirm or overturn a decision made by the lower court. In order for a case to be appealed to the Supreme Court, the appealing attorney must file a writ of certiorari. This is a formal request to the Court for the case to be heard.

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Feel Like Redecorating? Try Some of These Dorm Ideas

dormDecorating a room is a great way to express yourself. Many interior-decorating techniques can be used to create an image you want to convey towards the company you have over.

One of the best places to try decorating extravaganzas is in a dorm room. Why you may ask? Well for starters, it’s not permanent. By the end of this semester, many of you will be moving out of your dorm rooms. That poster, bedspread, or color-motif you originally set up in your room is not permanent. If in a couple of months, weeks or days you don’t like your original design of the room, it’s very easy to change it or spruce it up with a couple of steps.

The dorm is also a great place to express yourself because it’s a time of independence. You’re moved out of your house and this is your time to learn about yourself, especially through the form of expression. Use the dorm as a venue of expression, and decorate. There are many techniques and tricks to design a dorm room.

Set-up is the foundation of any room, especially when a room is limited in space. It can be difficult for many people to decorate a limited space without overdoing it, and essentially over-cramping it, making the room seem more cluttered and busy. In a dorm room, occupancy ranges from one to three individuals, which can lead up to three beds, three dressers and three desks. Creating space in a dorm room can be difficult, but with some techniques, more space can be created, making it easier to decorate.

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Will the Real Winter Please Show Up?

Real WinterThe weather that Mother Nature has been gracing us with seems to be the only thing more unpredictable than scoring a prime parking spot in the zoo, better known as the commuter lot.

Scarves, hats, gloves, and heavy puffer coats are considered typical winter fashion; however, the recent indecisive weather pattern has made wearing a t-shirt to class in February the norm on campus.

The Washington Post reported that many parts of the central and eastern United States have been experiencing temperatures 20 to 30 degrees warmer than average. The unusually warm weather has transformed winter fashion, causing students and faculty to adapt to the random changes to the best of their ability.

“I’ve noticed my students coming to class dressed in layers,” said communication professor Shannon Hokanson. Hokanson, who takes an interest in fashion, sees the relatively warmer weather as a positive opportunity.

“Ponchos are also very popular among my students,” explained Hokanson. Entering the world of high fashion this fall season, ponchos have made a smooth transition into the winter season considering the current weather pattern.

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Sent to Jail: The Innocence Project

Sent to Jail1Picture yourself in a small prison cell. The long years have been passing. Thinking back on it, you can hardly remember when exactly it was you were put there, but you know one thing; you were innocent and you have been serving time in place of the true criminal.

There is hardly any hope and freedom may never come. It is in this type of desperate situation that organizations such as the Innocence Project step in.

Elizabeth Webster, the publications manager from the Innocence Project, was a guest speaker at the University last Thursday during Professor Susan Douglas’ class in the History Department.
Webster spoke about the mission of the Innocence Project, the type of work the organization does, and the inherent flaws in the current U.S. legal system.

The Innocence Project works on using DNA evidence to prove the innocence of wrongfully convicted felons, hopefully leading to their exoneration. The organization was founded at Yeshiva University in 1992 by two lawyers, Barry C. Scheck and Peter J. Neufeld. It began as a small legal clinic that used DNA evidence to prove innocence, but due to the growing number of service requests, it eventually grew to become the national non-profit organization it is today.

While the exact number is not known, the current percentage of wrongfully convicted criminals in the U.S. judicial system is high.

Webster said, “The figure is somewhere in the hundreds or thousands, suspected to be between three and seven percent of the prison population.”

In a system based on the philosophy that guilty verdicts should not be delivered under any amount of reasonable doubt, why are so many innocent people going to jail?

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu