Tue06272017

Last updateTue, 20 Jun 2017 11pm

News

Students Compete in Model UN

First Time Position Paper Award Winners


Students Compete Model UN

A delegation of 14 University students simulated the United Nations (UN) at the National Model United Nations Conference (NMUN) in New York from Sunday, April 9 to Thursday, April 13.

NMUN is the world’s largest international college-level experiential learning program in which participants cooperate to discuss and brainstorm solutions to global concerns faced by diplomats of the United Nations, according to their site.

For the first time the delegation from the University returned with a Position Paper Award. The award was won by Liam Coffey, a junior political science and history student.

Five thousand students from six continents participated in the 2017 NMUN conference, and 55 percent of the participants were non-U.S. residents, according to nmun.org.

Participants from the University were enrolled in Model UN Conference course, PS-383, taught by Dr. Kevin Dooley, an associate professor of political science. The delegation represented the Kingdom of Belgium.

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School of Social Work Launches New Initiative

Social Work Reveals Suicide Research 4.20.17

Suicide Prevention Research

The School of Social Work has announced its new initiative to continue their efforts in spreading awareness about suicide prevention by launching the SRF Suicide Prevention and Training Project.

“This recent development is the latest in a long line of projects the School of Social Work has undertaken, but it is only the most recent one, as well as a culmination of a lot of efforts over the years.” said Janine Vasconcelos, Assistant Director of Professional Education and Special Projects.

According to Robin Mama, Dean of the School of Social Work, the project has several aims. It seeks to establish training sessions around the issue of suicide in schools and colleges, as well as curriculum development, research, and evaluation efforts on suicide prevention, intervention, and what happens afterwards.

The goals of the project emerged through research discovered by Dr. Michelle Scott, associate professor in the school of social work, who is considered a leading expert on suicide and suicide prevention. According to Scott, about 42,000 Americans take their own lives every year; this means a suicide occurs in America every 13 seconds.

“Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students,” said Scott. “Individuals can be at increased risk for suicide when they experience a confluence of risk factors such as depression, anxiety, substance use, as well as prior suicidal behavior and a trigger event which may be a loss or transition,” Scott added.

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The Outlook Wins National Award

Outlook Wins National AwardThe Outlook, the University’s student-run newspaper, was ranked 8th in the Nation for “Best of Show Four-Year Weekly Newspaper,” by the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) at the Mid-winter National College Journalism Convention in San Francisco, California.

An issue of The Outlook was submitted in the “Best of Show Four- Year Weekly Newspaper” category and was reviewed by a panel of judges. Judges reviewed submissions from multiple colleges throughout the United States and established a National top ten out of all entries.

Placement was based on the number of entries and overall convention attendance. Over 750 schools attended the Convention this year. The Best of Show award does not signify a ranking of national excellence, but rather overall excellence among the attendees and entries, according to the ACP.

Danielle Schipani, senior communication student and current Editor-In-Chief of The Outlook was honored to be a part of an award-winning paper and commended the work of rest of the editorial staff and their contributions. “Every member of the editorial staff has worked tirelessly all year to ensure that we are printing a quality paper for the campus community,” she said.

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Dr. Waters Selected for Guggenheim Fellowship

Dr.Waters Selected For FellowshipDr. Michael Waters, an English professor, is amongst 173 artists and scholars selected from over 3,000 applicants for the prestigious 2017 Guggenheim Fellowship. Waters was awarded $50,000 for his longstanding poetic experience from the yearlong Fellowship that begins in January 2018.

Fellows are selected from the United States and Canada for demonstrating exceptional skill in productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts, according to gf.org.

Waters explained that the award was based on the quality of his past work, and his plans for future work. He said, “In my application I said that I would continue to write poems that would connect the old world in Eastern Europe to the new world. An example of that would be a poem about a monk at monastery blessing the engine of new car.”

“I thought that it was something I would have 40 years ago when I didn’t deserve it. Now that it has come I am just very happy for the acknowledgement,” said Waters.

University President Grey Dimenna, applauds Waters for his newfound success. “Guggenheim Fellowships are one of academia’s highest honors, and we are all proud that Dr. Waters joins the ranks of the gifted scholars, writers, and artists who have received the award in its 92-year history,” Dimenna said.

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University Plans to Redevelop Sustainability Council

University Redevelops Sustainability CouncilThe University will be redeveloping its Sustainability Council with faculty and students, and forming a detailed ten-year plan to improve Monmouth University’s green initiatives according to Patricia Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services.

The Monmouth University Sustainability Council was formed in 2009. It originally was a group of 30 volunteers comprised of students, faculty, staff and administrators whose mission was to promote environmental awareness and encourage development of an environmentally responsible campus community, according to the University website.

However, some students recently noticed that the Sustainability Council was no longer active at the University. “Some peers and I were looking at the Monmouth website online a couple of weeks ago, at the Sustainability Council page, and noticed that the a few members of the faculty listed don’t work here anymore,” said Carly Miller a junior homeland security student. “We were so surprised how outdated our sustainability page was. Especially because it was online for the public to see. The site has since been updated, but the last notable edit on the page prior to the site removal, was around Earth Day 2015,” continued Miller.

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Underpass Will Re-open After Recent Collapse

Underpass Reopen After CollapseThe underpass tunnel that crosses over cedar avenue collapsed on Sunday April 16 and was discovered at 12:55 p.m. by a Residence Assistant (RA). There were no injuries and no one was in the underpass when the incident occurred.

The Monmouth University Police Department (MUPD) responded and notified Patricia Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services, of the situation. Swannack was called and advised MUPD to close the underpass until they could assess the damage. The Facilities Management staff came in and removed the pieces that had fallen after its closure.

The underpass was closed from Sunday to Tuesday April 18 and during its closure the University placed a Safety Officer at the corner of Norwood and Cedar Avenue to assist pedestrians from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. The underpass is expected to reopen the morning of Wednesday April 19, according to Swannack.

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“Didn’t They Say That Only Love Will Win in the End” | Danielle Schipani's Senior Goodbye

4.19.17 D S 1They tell you that college goes by so fast. They tell you that one minute you’re a freshman and the next you’re a senior about to grace the graduation stage. They tell you to have fun and enjoy the moment, to get involved, to open up and put yourself outside of your comfort zone. But what you don’t hear about and what they don’t tell you is just how many impactful people you will meet and how hard it will be to let them go.

I walked onto this campus afraid of what it meant to leave home, afraid that I would lose connections with the people that I love, and scared of change. What I soon realized was that Monmouth had been a part of my life all along and that I was always meant to be a Monmouth Hawk. The people that I have met here and the education I have been honored with has allowed me to grow into the person that I always wanted to be but never thought I deserved. I am grateful for this experience and for everything Monmouth has given me and there are countless people I would like to thank.

My sister: Hey sisterrrr! You are the light in my life and my best friend. You are the reason that I keep going and stay motived. Thank you for always supporting me, for always listening to me, and for always being able to make me laugh. I know it was hard a lot of the time being apart during my years at Monmouth and I wish I could have been around more for you. Thank you for always being understanding when I was away and for being there for me when I needed you the most. I can honestly say that without the love and the comfort you have given me throughout my entire life I would have never made it to graduation day. I am so proud of everything you have overcome and accomplished this year. You are the strongest person I know. We are in this world together, you are never alone, and I will always be there for you. I love you.

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“Don’t Worry About a Thing, ‘Cause Every Little Thing is Gonna Be Alright” | Jamilah McMillan's Senior Goodbye

It pains me to write this because it means that I am nearing the end of a riveting installment in the series that is my life. Four years ago, my parents waved me off as I drove to class, for the first time in our families 8-passenger minivan. Any growth since that frightful day is due to the kindness and generosity of individuals who took the time to push me forward, or point me in the right direction. So please pardon me as I begin this drawn out letter of gratitude for those who deserve tremendous applause.

Mi Familia: Thank you to my dysfunctional clan who has put up with me over the last four years. Sorry for all the times that I missed a game, or a family dinner, because I was studying, doing homework, in class, at a conference, or hosting an event...or a protest. I love you all--you are my backbone.

Dr. Datta: Words cannot describe the short amount of time it took for you to make a tremendous impact in my life. You are my mentor, teacher, and friend. Thank you for helping me see my own potential for change; for helping me see the power of women and girls; and for helping me see the importance of education. Dhanyavaad.

Dr. Patten: You have always said that you are my number one fan. Thank you for always encouraging me to shoot high. I will try my best.

Professor Morano: You helped us become great editors so we could create a weekly publication that we could be proud of. Thank you for teaching and leading us.

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Plan for Payments: A Look Into Student Loan Debt

Plan For PaymentsPaying off student loans is a feat that most student loan borrowers must face just six months after graduation, as the average student loan from a 4-year college in 2016 was approximately $37,100, according to studentloanhero.com.

Upon graduation, a student must pick a particular plan to pay off their student loans, according to an article published by nerdwallet.com. There are eight different plans a student can choose from to repay their federal student loans, including four that are based on income level.

The basic payment plans include standard, graduated and extended plans. Unless a student elects otherwise, they will be placed on the standard repayment plan, which is ten years for many companies, according to the article. This would mean that the average student will pay approximately $259 per month, on a 10 year standard plan.

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‘Walk a Mile in Her Shoes’ Brings Awareness to Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault Awareness WalkNearly 100 students and faculty put on women’s shoes and walked in the ninth annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event to raise awareness for sexual assault and gender violence on Wednesday, April 6.

The original event, started in 2001, was created as an opportunity for men to raise awareness in their community about the serious causes, effects and restitution to men’s sexualized violence against women, according to the organizations official site. Its intention was to create a discussion and to establish open communication on sexual violence.

Coordinated by Thomas McCarthy, Assistant Director of Counseling and Psychological Services, the event had a large presence from the Greek community, as well as Monmouth Athletics, such as the men’s basketball team.

McCarthy said, “It is absolutely important to have a strong male presence here. The event was started by men to bring awareness to show that we are here to support. Having campus leaders, like athletes and Greeks really helps to spread the message and make sexual assault a men’s issue too.”

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Jack Ford Creates Dialogue About Student-Athlete Wages

Jack Ford Athlete Wages 1The University hosted a lecture by television news personality Jack Ford in Anacon Hall that was designed as an open dialogue regarding the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the controversy regarding student athlete wages on Wednesday, April 5.

Ford began the lecture talking about his background. He and his three siblings were raised by a single mother, as their father abandoned the family when Ford was five years of age. Shortly thereafter, Ford moved into the attic of his grandparents’ home in Jersey City that had no air conditioning. However, his mother was steadfast in her commitment to youth athletics, and Ford excelled at football.  Eventually, he received a scholarship to play at Yale University, then received a law degree from Fordham Univer-sity.

Being a former college athlete himself, Ford discussed the recent NCAA college basketball tournament and his thoughts concern-ing the organizations reception.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu