Fri10192018

Last updateWed, 10 Oct 2018 4pm

Opinion

The Importance of Physical Music

There is More to Music than Meets the Ear


My dad always says to me, “When I was a kid, we spent our money on vinyl records, not whatever you kids do today.” The act of listening to music was a huge part of people’s lives. More often than not, people would make an experience out of listening to a whole 45 minute or so album. Buying and listening to music used to be a big event for music lovers, which made the music more meaningful.

Music was made for the sole purpose of listening and experiencing the music. Now, music seems to be just the background noise in everyone’s lives. Many people only listen to music at parties or when they’re out just to dance or have something playing to fill the space. There’s nothing wrong with dancing to music, but there is so much more to it that younger people today don’t understand.

The world of music is similar today as it was during our parents and grandparents’ generation. There are still boybands, pop icons, rock stars, etc. The big difference is what is important to fans about these artists. In the 1960s when fan girls swooned over The Beatles members’ long hair and British accents; they weren’t only concerned with the band’s image, they were attached to their music. If you heard a song on the radio that you really liked, you would go find that song on whatever album it was on, then buy the vinyl record for it, and spin it until the record wore out.

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Gym Culture: No Need to be So Intimidated

Gym Culture Dont be IntimidatedEvery day it seems like there is an overwhelming amount of new information emerging that has to do with health and fitness lifestyles. Whether it be our diets or what we physically do with our bodies, it is hard to get away from the conversation. Magazines, television, and social media (specifically, Instagram) are flooded with images of people at their peak performance, giving the impression that “gym culture” is now a significant part of our everyday life.

The media pushes this image on us, but the reality is that not everyone exists in a perfectly picturesque health and fitness bubble. Many feel as though joining a gym and being a part of that arena is intimidating for different reasons, such as learning how to participate and fit in to a new space that has been labeled “male dominated.” While there are some truths built into these statements, they should not be the end all be all to the decision to be a part of any “gym culture.”

The first step into this realm may translate into a few hours of the week and, as a busy MU student, this may help you decompress from the many stresses we experience in a positive and productive way.

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Why We Love Dogs So Much

Why We Love DogsPlain and simple: dogs are God’s gift to this earth. There is nothing that makes a heart smile more than a dog with a cocked head and searching eyes does. There is something truly incredible about the way dogs make us feel and, simply put, it is therapeutic.

Around campus, dogs are usually greeted with gasps, pointing, and fawning. There is a reason for this obsession. According to an article on Psychology Today, there is a concept called “biophilia,” which means that we are all genetically programmed to interact with nature. We seek a connection and relationship with living things.

We have an internal yearning for these connections and relationships, not only with our peers, but with animals and what better animal is there than a dog (cat people will debate, but I think the paws have it)?

Biophilia, the article suggests, could be the reason that we don’t find dog slobber as disgusting as it really is, or why petting a dog is extremely soothing and comforting. Interacting with animals is proven to lower blood pressure and brings a sense of calmness and awareness that we really cannot achieve on our own.

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Life Lessons for an MU Student from Parks and Recreation

Although Parks and Recreation may have ended almost two years ago, the cast of hilarious and uplifting actors have brought about tears, joy, and many life lessons that are still valuable and applicable. Leslie Knope, Ron Swanson, Tom Haverford, April Ludgate-Dwyer, and the rest of the Pawnee Parks Department crew have offered some of their most coveted life lessons to society.

Leslie Knope has taught us all to be opinionated on everything. Whether it be a social norm, politics, or just a hairstyle you may or may not want, the fearless gal that she is has always taught her peers that being opinionated is never a bad thing. Today’s society is filled with news resources and outlets, social media, and many other platforms for us to become educated about whatever it is that we are even the slightest bit curious about; it’s time for us to research and be vocal and bold now more than ever.

April Ludgate-Dwyer has shown us, first-hand, that taking that random internship is completely worth it. In the beginning of the series, Ludgate is found as the most conniving and least dedicated worker in the department, but, as the show progresses, the audience is able to really see that her simple summer internship has lead her in the direction of her lifelong career.

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Benefits of Service Trips

A Personal Look Into the Guatemala Service Trip


On my first day at Monmouth University, Dr. Christopher Hirschler, an associate professor and chair of health and physical education, recommended the course Guatemala Public Health. At first I thought the class was not for me because of concerns I had about the safety of traveling to Guatemala. However, everything changed fall 2016 when I took the class Health in Developing Countries. This class, taught by Dr. Kiameesha Evans, a specialist professor of health and physical education, emphasized the desperate needs of people living in other countries and how we can make a difference.

Later in that semester, I decided to apply to Guatemala Public Health, which was one of the best decisions I have ever made. On Mar. 11, as I looked upon Guatemala from the airplane window, I was in shock with the beauty of the land. As we began the journey into this amazing country, my concerns decreased because I felt safe and welcome at all times.

Nine students, seven health studies students, one psychology student, and one social work student, along with Dr. Hirschler spent eight days in Guatemala; I could not have been happier being part of such amazing group. We worked towards the same goal- to bring happiness and health education to women and children at a domestic violence shelter in Xela, Guatemala.

We also worked to improve the lives of families by building bunk beds. Some may think, ‘beds?’ Yes, beds! Families of six or eight people were sleeping in one bed. By building beds we were supplying a long-term solution that instantly improved quality of life.

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Bringing Back Childhood Habits

Growing up sucks. There, I said it. Having to juggle school, work and friends can be exhausting and oftentimes, it leaves you yearning for the past in which you had little to no responsibilities and even the smallest moments could bring about immense joy.

As a child there was no greater feeling than receiving something in the mail, be it a birthday card, party invitation or a letter stating who your teacher would be for the upcoming year. While I am still guilty of being excited over receiving mail, that excitement fades once I realize the ‘surprise’ in the mail is nothing more than my bank statement (yikes) or perhaps a textbook shipped from Amazon.

Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, we have outgrown our childhood years and the realities of adulthood have either smacked us in the face or are looming ahead in the near future. The most crucial part, however, of becoming a mature adult and figuring out who you are or wish to be, is to never let go of your inner child. Let’s take a trip down memory lane, recall some of the best childhood memories, and figure out how we can still incorporate them into our daily lives as college students.

Nap Time

Remember the days when taking naps was not only encouraged, but enforced? Why did I ever take such an opportunity for granted? Yeah, learning the alphabet, colors and simple addition and subtraction was hard work, but by no means was it as stressful as daily college life is now.

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A Review of the 1960s: Peace, Love, and Music

Review 1960 Peace MusicThe “Summer of Love” really sums up the history of hippie beliefs and fashion. In the summer of 1967 in San Francisco, over 100,000 people gathered to promote love and protest the Vietnam War. Monterey Pop Festival was another part of the Summer of Love that included a three-day music festival in Monterey, California. This festival had some iconic performances from acts like The Jimi Hendrix Experience and artists like The Who and Janis Joplin. A few years later in August of 1969 is when the most famous music festival occurred: Woodstock.

The emergence of these musical festivals that focused on peace, love, and music came along with the developing rock and roll counter culture. The conservative, “keeping up with the joneses” lifestyle of the 1950s was a perfect segue into the counter culture that came to be in the 1960s.

Although rock and roll began with artists like Chuck Berry in the 40s and even a little later in the 50s with Elvis Presley, the 1960s is most known for the solid rock and roll culture. Rock music helped to motivate young people to question their government and what was going on in the world.

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Beauty Standards

The internet is like your “best friend” from 7th grade that became too cool for you in 8th grade: two-faced. For goodness sake people, it is 2017 why do articles such as “35 Unattractive Things Girls Do That They Think Is Attractive (According To 35 Guys)” still exist? More importantly, who are the people behind these pieces of “literary” trash and what do I have to do to knock some sense into them?

Articles like the one mentioned above are ones that pop up on your Facebook feed as you aimlessly scroll through an endless amount of memes, Tasty videos, and status updates from your Facebook-loving grandmother in Florida. Under normal circumstances, I would usually scroll right past such an article and probably scowl for a second, roll my eyes, and move on by watching some silly video about a baby panda. But, for the sake of my journalistic duties, I had to muster up my strength and see what this ridiculous article was all about. “Perhaps it’s a parody article?” I thought to myself, but alas I was wrong.

So, ladies, listen up: if you want to be attractive to men and continue to serve the patriarchy, here are some absolute don’ts, as told by the experts themselves:

Don’t get tattoos

Don’t have short hair or bangs

Don’t wear lip-gloss

Don’t wear “high-top” jeans

And the list goes on…

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Music Streaming: Exclusivity Could Be Hurting Fans

Music Streaming ExclusivityDrake, Beyoncé, Frank Ocean, Future, Kanye West, are just some of the major artists we love that have released exclusive music to their fans. Nothing captures our attention more than when we hear the word “exclusive.” When our favorite artists release a statement about this new music, it becomes a craze. Whether it be a new album, new song, or new feature, we’re all thinking, “this is going to be amazing.”

We get to hear something fresh, especially if it’s been a while since something was last released. We see our excitement shoot right through the roof, and the countdown starts. Yet, once we finally find out where we’ll be able to hear it, a lot changes. Some music is released as an “AppleMusic exclusive” or “Tidal exclusive” and then you think- wait… what? Your heart stops for a second. The only thing running through your mind is: “I don’t have AppleMusic or Tidal.”

If you’re a huge music fan like I am, then this situation sounds very familiar to you. When this happens, our hearts sink- no new music for us. Unable to enjoy this release, a large chunk of fans are being left out. The single platform limits a great deal of what an artist has to offer.

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Response to Outlook Editorial: Monmouth is Green

We read the recent article regarding sustainability and wanted to share with you some of the University’s efforts to be green.

Monmouth University was the first private institution of higher education in New Jersey to enter into a voluntary Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), documenting our commitment as an environmental steward and pledging to reduce our carbon footprint. In addition, the University was the only institution of higher education east of the Mississippi to install a solar system in 2006. We have been included in the Princeton Review’s Guide to Green Colleges several times. We are also members of Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) and APPA: Leadership in Educational Facilities.

Our sustainability efforts are accomplished through the cooperation of multiple divisions and departments within the University. For example, Facilities Management organizes trash/recycling practices on-campus and coordinates our outside waste removal company. One of Gourmet Dining’s top priorities includes sustainable development, including purchasing food from sustainable sources whenever possible and by vowing to increase the amount of plastic recycled by at least 10% every year while sourcing alternative materials to replace the plastics used in their operations. Residential Life provides trash/recycling information included in their Residential Life Guidebook and hosts “floor meetings” during the first week of the Fall semester each year, and information is also included on bulletin boards and in hallways in residence halls. The Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services also provides information regarding trash/recycling in their Guide to Living Off-Campus. Information Management handles recycling computer equipment.

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Exploring Negative Effects of Social Media

Negative Effects Social MediaSocial media was created to allow people to get connected, but, ironically, people are becoming so distant from each other. Social media allows people to view the glamorous life of others from afar, but these glamorous posts only show what the person posting it wants viewers to see.

This causes a skewed perception of them, often making them see the one side of them that they portray on social media and not displaying the person who is posting’s actual character, their flaws or their misfortunes.

These images on social media convince people that those individuals are next to perfect based on seeing pictures of them appearing happy, wearing makeup, utilizing filters, and even looking insanely fit. When seeing these images, our minds often convince us that they are a superior being and that we are unworthy of knowing them. This causes people to be afraid to talk to them and just watch them from a distance because of their impending fear of being rejected by them.

This affects social interactions by causing people to be on their electronic devices, instead of being in the moment and actually talking to their peers. By engaging in these behaviors, it can lead to you feeling isolated, depressed, which could lead to low self-esteem. In time, it can trigger one to feel suicidal. These behaviors are linked together because when one feels isolated, they often have negative thoughts brewing in their mind leading to you to feel depressed, which makes them have a lower sense of self-esteem.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

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The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu