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News

Volume 83 (Fall 2011 - Spring 2012)

University Members Collectively Raise $43,000 at Relay for Life

news-relay-for-lifeFriday the 13 was anything but unlucky for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life at the University, as it raised approximately $43,027.

With six months of planning and no budget, Jess Rohr, the event Co-Chair, was very satisfied with how the event turned out. The event is run by Colleges Against Cancer but is an American Cancer Society event.

“We had 50 teams and 633 participants at Relay this year, which is an all-time high,” Rohr said.

Everything purchased and booked for the event was donated from different vendors.

“Vendors such as Chick-Filet, Scala’s Pizzeria, Joe’s Pizzeria and Live Nation as well as the University and students, helped make this event possible. We had two students, Chris Spirito and Phil Nappen DJ our event, as well as a performance from Ross the Magic Man. We reached out to different bands such as Sibling Rivalry to perform as well,” Rohr said. According to Rohr, without the vendors and donations, the event would have not been possible.

This year was the first year that the event was hosted inside of the Multipurpose Activity Center. Previously, the event was held on the Kessler Field, which, according to Rohr, wasn’t always pleasant. “This was the first year I did not freeze at Relay,” Rohr said.

The basketball court was covered with tents and sleeping bags of the different teams and a stage was set up for the performances throughout the night. The track around the basketball court was walked by attendees throughout the night. The tradition was started in 1985 when Dr. Gordy Klatt decided to run for 24 hours straight to fight against cancer.

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Filtered Water Stations Diminish Use of Plastic Bottles

news-filtered-waterThe University has begun installing filtered hydration stations around campus so students will be able to refill and reuse old water bottles.

“We are looking for every opportunity we can find to increase sustainability,” said Patti Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services. “This is a huge sustainability issue because it saves plastic bottles.”

According to the University’s Environmental Assessment Semi-Annual Report, the stations will be installed in the Rebecca Stafford Student Center, Multipurpose Activity Center (MAC) and Edison Science Hall. The stations will comply with standards set forth in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and allow for students to refill their bottles hands-free at no charge.

The stations filter tap water that comes from preexisting water lines, like those connected to water fountains. The water is filtered and cooled in succession, allowing for instant and hands-free pouring. The hands-free, straight to bottle feature of the system also makes the stations more hygienic than standard water fountains.

“I like that the school has a hydration station because I bring a water bottle to school every day, but usually finish it before the day is over and have to buy another drink,” said Katie Zaccarelli, a senior. “Now I can save money and just refill my bottle. Also water fountains in general use to gross me out because it was always warm and you never could get enough, but now this is much better.”

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Sovereign Bank to Replace Wells Fargo on Campus

news-wells-fargoThe University is switching its on-campus banking services to Sovereign Bank from Wells Fargo on June 1, as the latter’s contract is set to expire.

The University has had a contract with Wells Fargo for at least 10 years, said Mary Anne Nagy, Vice President for Student and Community Services. “We had a competitive bidding process where we developed a request for proposal and sent to it 10 banks and five banks submitted a proposal,” Nagy continued. “We reviewed the proposals, had a presentation with all the banks to a team of people and, at the end of the evaluation process, Sovereign Bank seemed like the appropriate choice.”

The new Sovereign Bank ATMs will have a surcharge for using them without having a Sovereign Bank account card. “That is why we are getting out early with this information so students can make an account,” Nagy said. “It’s free so it seems like it makes sense.”

Joseph Cahalin, a junior business management major, said he got a Wells Fargo bank account because he knew it was the banking that the University had. He also already has a Sovereign Bank account from back home, so the switching of banks will not really affect him.

However, Carolyn Taylor, a junior majoring in photography, will have to give up her free trips to the ATM. “I don’t have a Wells Fargo account because I don’t have that bank close to home, but I use the ATM on campus for convenience,” Taylor said. “I don’t have to drive out of my way to get cash out and it’s in a convenient central location on campus.”

Taylor said that even though it is easier, she won’t be switching banks. “I will just have to start stopping at TD Bank when I’m going somewhere to avoid ATM charges.”

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Writing Center Merges With Tutorting Center

Jane DeTullio, former Director of the University’s Writing Center, unexpectedly resigned from her position on Tuesday of last week. Detullio did not provide any specific reasons for leaving, according to her co-workers.

While deciding which direction to take, the University saw an opportunity to improve the Writing Center by combining it with the Tutoring Center. The two are now part of an entity called Tutoring and Writing Services located on the lower level of the Rebecca Stafford Student Center. Dorothy Cleary is the Director of Tutoring and Writing Services while Neva Pontoriero is the Assistant Director of Writing Services and Supplemental Instruction.

Despite the merger, the academic utilities remain the same as the two formerly separate services. “We are running Writing Services as it has been in the past and will continue offering one-on-one tutoring sessions, group tutoring sessions and workshop series,” Pontoriero said. “Our general goal, as always, is to offer writing assistance to students across all disciplines and throughout all stages of the writing process. Students can come here to obtain help ranging from how to understand an assignment to having another pair of eyes help them review a final draft.”

Pontoriero, who will be overseeing day-to-day opertions of Writing Services and Supplemental Instruction, is familiar with the interaction between writing assistants and students, and knows the benefits that it has to offer. “I have had the opportunity to work with students in the past as a writing assistant for almost five years,” she continued. “As students continued to use the Writing Center, I saw definite improvements with their writing skills.”

Cleary said that the relationship between her and Pontoriero is a strong one. “We are a good team and we both have experience in these services,” she commented. “We are both very excited about the opportunity and want to make the transition as smooth as possible. It is important to emphasize that our main priority is to serve the students.”

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Writing Center Merges With Tutoring Center

default article imageJane Detullio, former Director of the University’s Writing Center, unexpectedly resigned from her position on Tuesday of last week. Detullio did not provide any specific reasons for leaving, according to her coworkers.

While deciding which direction to take, the University saw an opportunity to improve the Writing Center by combining it with the Tutoring Center.  The two are now part of an entity called Tutoring and Writing Services located on the lower level of the Rebecca Stafford Student Center.  Dorothy Cleary is the Director of Tutoring and Writing Services while Neva Pontoriero is the Assistant Director of Writing Services and Supplemental Instruction.

Despite the merger, the academic utilities remain the same as the two formerly separate services. “We are running Writing Services as it has been in the past and will continue offering one-on-one tutoring sessions, group tutoring sessions and workshop series,” Pontoriero said.  “Our general goal, as always, is to offer writing assistance to students across all disciplines and throughout all stages of the writing process.  Students can come here to obtain help ranging from how to understand an assignment to having another pair of eyes help them review a final draft.”

Pontoriero, who will be overseeing day-to-day operations of Writing Services and Supplemental Instruction, is familiar with the interaction between writing assistants and students, and knows the benefits that it has to offer.  “I have had the opportunity to work with students in the past as a writing assistant for almost five years,” she continued. “As students continued to use the Writing Center, I saw definite improvements with their writing skills.”

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Kortney Rose Foundation Holds GUC 5K

default article imageIt was perfect weather for the third Annual Global Understanding 5K on University’s campus on Friday, April 6, 2012 to benefit pediatric brain tumor research through The Kortney Rose Foundation (KRF). With close to 100 participants, it was the largest turnout for this event to date. The beauty of the campus lends itself to a wonderful venue for this event. The 5K event caps off the Global Understanding Convention which is a week full of events open to the campus and public, which brings light to global events. This year’s convention was titled “Freedom, Sustainability, and Security: Creating Interconnected and Inclusive Communities.”

David Wong was the first man to finish in 19:07 and student Jenna Intersimone was the first female to finish with a time of 21:25. We would like to thank the sponsors of the event, the Institute for Global Understanding, The Political Science Club, the Sociology Club, Aramark, Monmouth Athletic Department, and Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc. for their support. A very special thank you is needed for the generosity of both Professor Peter Reinhart, Director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute and Professor Joe Patten, Chair of the Department of Political Science and Sociology. Both professors offered a challenge to all participants that they would donate money to the KRF for each person who finished before them. Thanks to their generosity and the support of those who participated, $1500 was raised to benefit pediatric brain tumor research through KRF.

Kristen Gillette, Founder and President of The Kortney Rose Foundation said, “We are so grateful to the Monmouth campus community, and beyond, for their support of this event to Help Get Brain Tumors Off Kids’ Minds.”

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International Guest Speakers Hit the Keynote on Global Issues

GUC Keynote World Crimes 1The 11th Annual Global Understanding Convention’s keynote address took place in Wilson Hall on Tuesday, April 3. The speech focused on this year’s theme of Freedom, Sustainability and Security: International Criminal Law and Human Rights.

The event attracted over 400 attendees, including faculty, students and administrators. As the audience was being seated, junior Meredith Calcagno and sophomore Michael Rosas performed a musical prelude along with Laura DuBois, a professor in the Music and Theatre Department.

The keynote speech welcomed two speakers, Raymond Brown and Wanda Akin, who are the co-founders of the International Justice Project. The two speakers are also are married to each other.

During their keynote address, the speakers touched upon the current situation in Darfur, the implications caused by blood diamonds in Sierra Leone, the KONY movement, the work of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the struggles that women face in war-torn regions of the world.

Their non-profit organization was established in 2004 with the purpose of providing support to victims of world crimes such as genocides, war crimes and crimes against humanity. The organization also conducts outreach and educated survivors, human rights advocates, activists and other organizations about the ICC, international criminal law, human rights and the current situation in Darfur, according to internationaljusticeproject. com.

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Students are Educated on Diversity in the Workplace

default article imageHow do different cultures communicate with each other?

That’s the question that Dr. Don Swanson, Chair of the University’s Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary Studies Department, tried to answer during a seminar entitled “Challenges of Cross-Cultural Communication.” Swanson held the seminar in conjunction with Global Understanding Convention.

Swanson presented a slideshow trying to answer the questions of “How do people with different cultural backgrounds work in the workplace together?” He viewed the question as a case study and brought up examples from when he spent time in Guam.

Swanson was the Dean at the University of Guam, but he also worked with a company helping the workers to communicate better and understand the different cultures.

There were several different job titles that had people of different cultures working together. The managers in the company were either American or Japanese.

The middle managers consisted of Americans, Australians, Koreans, Filipinos, Chamorros (people indigenous to the Mariana Islands) and Chi. The number of nationalities represented at the University of Guam represent the U.S. territory’s diversity, as only 12 percent of its population is Caucasian. With all of these different cultures trying to work together in the same place, Swanson explained that “patience and tolerance” are the keys.

Swanson also spoke about the different ways that cultures think. Americans follow individualism while other cultures follow collectivism. Eighty percent of the world is collectivists, meaning that Americans are the minority, Swanson said.

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Panel Discussion Brings Awareness to Unknown Global Issues

default article imageThe Global Understanding Convention continued with “Diversity and the Interworking’s of Cultural Politics,” a panel discussion hosted by the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) early last week. The panel sought to raise awareness concerning several global issues, all of which involve the United States yet remain unknown to many Americans.

Tess La Fera, one of the event’s presenters who serves as the Secretary of LASO and office assistant in the Institute for Global Understanding, mentioned the importance of making these issues known to others.

“We live in a global world and there’s no escaping the eminency of the consequences, both positive and negative,” La Fera said. “Should we choose to enclose ourselves in a bubble and ignore the impact that we have on the rest of the world, as well as the impact the rest of the world has on us, we are only harming our own future security and well-being.”

In addition to La Fera, other presenters included Professor Gisela Cordero of the Foreign Language Department and Dr. Rosemary Barbera, Associate Director of the Institute for Global Understanding. Throughout the panel discussion, each speaker addressed a different issue that is currently affecting several nations.

The first issue, as presented by Cordero, concerned the damaging effects that U.S. oil drilling has had on the people of the Amazon. The drilling of American oil companies, including Texaco and Chevron, is leaving Amazon farmers with contaminated land and severe health issues, including a variety of cancers, Cordero said.

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Seminar Highlights Effects of Global Warming on Oceans

default article imageThe University community was introduced to the growing problem occurring in the ocean through a seminar entitled “Sea Change: Imagine a World Without Fish” last Wednesday as a part of the Global Understanding Convention. The event consisted of a film viewing followed by a presentation and discussion led by Dr. Matthew Poach, a Marine Biochemist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Ursula Howson, a professor of biology, began the program with an introduction to the film “A Sea Change.” The documentary “investigates how ocean acidification will affect future generations,” Howson said. According to the NOAA, ocean acidification is a process through which carbon dioxide is absorbed by the ocean and changes the chemistry in the water. As described by the film, ocean acidification is “the ‘flipside’ of global warming.”

The documentary featured Sven Huseby, a retired history teacher who, after reading an article about ocean acidification, became worried that his grandchildren would be affected by the changes. The film documents Huseby’s efforts to research the causes and effects of the issue, as well as how it can be fixed.

As presented to the audience, the film explains that the world’s oceans have absorbed 188 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide in the last 200 years, with 22 million tons being absorbed every day. As a result, oceans are becoming increasingly acidic. With these rapid chemical changes, oceanic species are unable to adapt to the ocean’s high levels of acidity.

The documentary also included commentary from scientists who fear a mass extinction of the coral reefs. In the film, Huseby asks, “Are we screwed?” to which oceanographers respond, “Yes, to a considerable extent.” It also mentioned that scientists recognize ocean acidification as an “irreversible experiment” that could result in mass oceanic extinction anywhere from 30 to 300 years from now if the problem continues.

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University Members Hold Rally to End Use of Child Soldiers

default article imageA rally to end the use of child soldiers was held on the steps of Wilson Hall early last Thursday. Students and faculty gathered to pay homage to children ages five to 15 who face torture, rape, crimes and even post-traumatic stress disorder.

The rally also was held as a part of the United Nations Academic Impact initiative, which is “a global initiative that aligns institutions of higher education with the United Nations in actively supporting 10 universally accepted principles in areas of human rights, literacy, sustainability and conflict resolution,” according to its website. The initiative urges students to share information about child soldiers.

According to sources such as Amnesty International, the Child Soldiers Report of 2008, and Conventions on the Rights of a Child, the Revolutionary Armed Forces, National Liberation Army of Columbia, Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam/Sri Lanka and the Lord’s Resistance Army of Uganda have been using children for years. However, there are other armed forces that use children in Thailand, India, the Philippines and Myanmar, among other countries.

Oscar Sanchez, a junior communication major, helped organize the event along with Tess La Fera, a member of the Institute for Global Understanding.

“People need to find something they are passionate about. They should do something, have something to stand for,” Sanchez said. “This will create a better campus community and an overall a better world; spread the word.”

La Fera said that the event was a response to the Kony 2012 documentary that recently went viral. She commented that people must understand that the forcing of children to become child soldiers is a violation of human rights and awareness must be raised.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu