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Last updateMon, 29 Apr 2019 1pm

News

VP Student Services 1/25/12

default article imageTo All of Our Students:

Welcome and Welcome Back!

I trust you enjoyed the holiday season and are well on your way to adjusting to life at Monmouth Uni-versity. The spring semester will go quickly so plan accordingly and take advantage of all that we have to offer.

Come see the exciting new style of basketball being played by your HAWKS in the MAC - watch a film on Friday or Saturday night in Oakwood Hall - think about Spring Break in Disney with the Student Activities Board – and don’t forget to get your ticket to see four-time Grammy Award nominee Daughtry perform live in the MAC on Friday, April 20.

All of this and more is at your fingertips on your campus. Make it the best semester ever. If you need help in any way, reach out - speak up - and ask for help from the myriad of offices that are here to assist you.

Take care of yourself and take care of each other. My best wishes for a successful spring 2012 semester!

Mary Anne Nagy

Vice President for Student and Community Services

Asbestos Removed from Howard Hall During Break

Asbestos Abatement HowardThe first floor of Howard Hall underwent an asbestos abatement which lasted for five days at the end of December. Amid the process, public access was prohibited. Facilities Management dis-covered the problem as a result of loose tiles damaged by water infiltration.

Patricia Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services, says that knowledge of what to look for is important when dealing with the suspicion of asbestos. “In our experience, we are aware of certain things that might indicate the presence of asbestos and that it can be hazardous if not properly handled.” 

The indicator, in this case, was the dimensions of the tiles present in the affected area. According to the New Jersey Department of Health website, asbestos has been linked to specific tile dimensions that are used in flooring. Those dimensions are nine feet by nine feet and some 12 feet by 12 feet tiles. To be certain that asbestos was in fact in the tiles of that particular part of Howard Hall, samples were test-ed by an independent laboratory and confirmed present in minimal amounts.

In taking precautionary measures to assure proper removal of the tiles, the University hired an outside contractor who specializes in asbestos abatement. A second company was in tandem to further compliment the safe removal of the asbestos. “We also engaged Birdsall Engineering to monitor the work to ensure that the project was per-formed in compliance with established guidelines,” Swannack said. Those guidelines, enacted by The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the New Jersey Department of Labor, not only enforce a stringent protocol of asbestos removal, but also accredit abatement companies to safe disposal of the building material. 

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Author and Political Influencer Robert Putnam to Speak at University

Author Speaks UniversityThe University will welcome renowned author Robert D. Putnam to speak in Wilson Auditorium on January 27.

Putnam has written many political books including his most famous, Bowling Alone and Making Democracy Work. Putnam is also the Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University and the director of the Manchester Graduate Programme in Social Change. Putnam has been called “the most influential academic in the world today,” according to the London Sunday Times. His books, although controversial, discuss American politics and what he feels has gone wrong with our government and what needs to be done to fix the situation today.

Putnam is credited with developing what is known as, “The two-level game theory,” which assumes that international agreements will only be successfully brokered if they result in domestic benefits. It is only another aspect to his long resume and contributions to society. Aside from the books he has written and the theory that has changed the way governments think and interact, Putnam has also helped change and shape the globe first hand by serving as an advisor to presidents and national leaders around the world.

 Putnam is a member of several societies including, the British Academy, the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the former President of the American Political Science Association and the recipient of the Skytte Prize, which is an award given yearly to the person who has made the most valuable contribution to political science. Putnam is also the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2011 Woodrow Wilson Foundation’s award for the best book on government, politics or international affairs.

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University Hosts 7th Annual “Break the Cycle, Be the Change”

default article imageIn order to continue the fight against bias and effort to promote respect among all people, the University hosted the 7th annual “Break the Cycle: Be the Change” last Thursday.

As students made their entrance into Anacon

Hall in the Rebecca Stafford Student Center, they were greeted by representatives from First Year Seminar, Counseling and Psychological Services, and the American Conference on Diversity.

The students were then split into groups to prepare for group discussions and skits to be held after the introduction.

The introduction covered basic ideas concerning discrimination and bias, including the idea that prejudice is a learned behavior, therefore it can be unlearned.

Kalisse Richardson, a member of the American Conference on Diversity, explained how hearing something new for the first time in a conversation can be difficult at first, but working towards understanding is worthwhile.

“Being actively engaged in the community can help bring about change,” Richardson said.

Following this was the group work. Ground rules were established that can be applied in daily life, such as keeping an open mind, taking responsibility for your actions and words, and communicating honestly.

Scenarios were then laid out which pondered what a change maker or change stopper would do in this situation. A change stopper is defined as a person who looks at a problem and puts all blame on other individuals, while a change maker is a person who looks at a problem and connects it to root causes to seek understanding and promote respect.

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University’s Office of Substance Awareness Offers Free Treatment

default article imageThe Office of Substance Awareness, located in the Health Center next to Birch Hall, provides free, confidential, short-term substance abuse treatment for all students. The Office of Substance Awareness also provides educational information and presents to first-year seminar classes.

The Office of Substance Awareness also reports substance use and abuse trends of concern to the University community. This year, a continuing trend of concern includes designer drugs such as synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana is a laboratory made product attempting to simulate marijuana and its effects. Sold under names such as, K2, Spice and Revelation Ultra; These products are made in China and there is very little known about what short and long term effects these products have on the brain. There have been many health concerns from people smoking these products to get high. We have seen people become sick, lose consciousness and even experience mental health symptoms including psychotic episodes from these types of products.

In addition to synthetic forms of marijuana, another product of concern is bath salts. This was the name given to a synthetic form of methamphetamine. What sounds like an innocent bubble bath product is actually a dangerous substance already banned in many states, including New Jersey as of August 2011.

Alcohol poisoning continues to be a leading concern on campus. According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website, a 2002 study estimates that more than 1,400 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die each year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries and 500,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 sustain unintentional alcohol-related injuries each year. Many students report drinking too much, too fast and experiencing memory blackouts, vomiting, passing out and hangovers. These harmful effects are preventable.

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Professors Trying to Stop Plagiarism

default article imageIn the early weeks of Katelyn Laeyt's freshman year at Ramapo College, a professor sent her class a clear message a classmate's plagiarized essay, each line marked in red, posted on the professor's door.

"You could see everything that was plagiarized," Laeyt said. "The message was, 'Don't do it.'"

Professors across the region say student plagiarism is on the rise, so they must be more creative and direct about how they combat it.

Some use Internet programs like Turnitin.com, the software that flagged passages in Laeyt’s paper that may have come from other sources. Some start the term with presentations about plagiarism and its consequences. Some simply try to be extra vigilant about changes in tone or uncharacteristic writing style in their students' essays.

Unless they are clear and consistent about their policies against plagiarism, professors said, they have no doubt some of their students tempted by the sheer amount of information easily available on the Internet will try it.

"Everyone thinks everyone else is doing it, so they're doing it, too," said Don McCabe, a Professor in the Management and Global Business Department of the Rutgers Business School who has spent the past 20 years studying academic dishonesty.

 "The number of students engaging in the behavior has not increased, but those who are doing it are doing it more often. They used to do it only when they were desperate. Now they do it as a matter of habit."

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University Delegates Attended 26th Annual National Conference on Ethics in America

default article imageDr. Golam M. Mathbor, Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences and a professor in the School of Social Work at the University, was selected to serve as mentor for the 26th annual National Conference on Ethics in America (NCEA).

“Dr. Golam Mathbor was selected as mentor because of his exceptional ability to facilitate discussion and promote ethical awareness,” remarked Lieutenant Colonel Michael Turner, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Simon Center for Professional Military Ethic.

The conference, held on October 16 to 20, was hosted by The Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic and sponsored by the West Point Class of 1970 at the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. The NCEA is a three-day conference involving approximately 180 undergraduate students from over 90 academic institutions and the nation’s service academies. The purpose of the conference is to promote the importance of integrity and ethical conduct in our collegiate, public, and professional communities. Its theme was “Serving with Integrity.”

College student delegates, under the guidance of their group mentors, discussed topics raised by plenary speakers. Mentors guided groups in discussions encouraging a respectful exchange of ideas and their rationale. The mentors introduced delegates to the decision-making methodology while allowing them to explore ethical challenges raised by the speakers.

Mathbor selected two student delegates from the University to participate in this prestigious NCEA event at USMA in consultation with Student Services Vice President MaryAnne Nagy. They were Aziz Mama, a junior accounting major, and Lori Mueller, another junior majoring in psychology and criminal justice.

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Hawk TV Will Launch New Website

default article imageHawk TV will be launching its new website on Wednesday, November 9 in hopes of promoting their programming and events.

Daniel Villanova, the Webmaster for Hawk TV, is in charge of creating the website.

“We are entering into the digital age and offering our viewers a chance to experience Hawk TV in a whole new way,” Villanova said. Hawk TV’s website in use now is “out-of-date” according to Villanova and the new website is a project started from scratch.

“I added a few new options on the new website and made it user-friendly. Most importantly, it will be current,” Villanova said.  

Villanova, who will receive his Information Technology certificate through completing the minor, has been working on the website by himself for eight months.

The website will feature online shows produced by Hawk TV members in an “Online Video Library.” There will also be a TV guide, and biographies of the staff members.

The most important aspect of launching the site is the accessibility, according to Villanova.

“Students will be able to access our work from any computer and any location. As of now, students living on campus were the only ones able to access the channel,” Villanova said.

The website will also feature links to Hawk TV’s social media websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, and their blog on wordpress.com titled “Hawk TV Stories.”

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University Delegates Attended 26th Annual National Conference on Ethics in America Screen reader support enabled.

default article imageDr. Golam M. Mathbor, Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences and a professor in the School of Social Work at the University, was selected to serve as mentor for the 26th annual National Conference on Ethics in America (NCEA).

“Dr. Golam Mathbor was selected as mentor because of his exceptional ability to facilitate discussion and promote ethical awareness,” remarked Lieutenant Colonel Michael Turner, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Simon Center for Professional Military Ethic.

The conference, held on October 16 to 20, was hosted by The Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic and sponsored by the West Point Class of 1970 at the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. The NCEA is a three-day conference involving approximately 180 undergraduate students from over 90 academic institutions and the nation’s service academies. The purpose of the conference is to promote the importance of integrity and ethical conduct in our collegiate, public, and professional communities. Its theme was “Serving with Integrity.”

College student delegates, under the guidance of their group mentors, discussed topics raised by plenary speakers. Mentors guided groups in discussions encouraging a respectful exchange of ideas and their rationale. The mentors introduced delegates to the decision-making methodology while allowing them to explore ethical challenges raised by the speakers.

Mathbor selected two student delegates from the University to participate in this prestigious NCEA event at USMA in consultation with Student Services Vice President MaryAnne Nagy. They were Aziz Mama, a junior accounting major, and Lori Mueller, another junior majoring in psychology and criminal justice.

Read more ...

Tenth Anniversary of 9/11 Lecture to Take Place

Thomas Kean, Former N.J. Governor, to Speak at Program


Tenth Anniversary 9 11 LectureThe University will present the program “9/11, A Ten Year Perspective” on Thursday, November 3 at 4:30 pm in Wilson Hall. With the passing of a decade, this event will allow people to gather at the University and reflect on their own perspectives of the terrorist attacks.

“It is surreal that it has been 10 years already,” said Rebecca Ryan, a senior, who was only 11yearsold on 9/11. “I can’t believe I lived through such a huge tragedy.”

Ryan said that she still recalls exactly where she was as that fateful day unfolded.

“I was in sixth grade English class. I remember my teacher coming into the classroom crying,” she said. “My school had students ranging from kindergarten to eighth grade. She was not allowed to tell us anything. We kept asking, ‘What’s wrong?,’ but she never said.”

Ryan said that her mother had picked her up from school, which struck her as unusual. When she asked her mom to tell her was going on, she explained what had happened to the World Trade Center. Ryan spent the rest of the day watching the smoking towers fall on every news station.

“9/11, A Ten Year Perspective” will have a variety of speakers including former New Jersey Governor Thomas H. Kean, who was chair of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks after 9/11.

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Facebook Affecting Law School Applicants

default article imageA recent study by Kaplan Test Prep has found that 41 percent of law school admission officers perform a Google search of their applicants before admission, while 37 percent use Facebook to check out a potential student. This is compared to 20 percent of college admissions officers and 27 percent of business school admissions officers.

Jeff Thomas, Director of prelaw programs at Kaplan Test Prep, says this is justifiable behavior for the admission process.

“Despite jokes and negative stereotyping of lawyers, the reality is that the legal community takes ethics among its members very seriously,” Thomas said. “You not only have to be accepted to a state bar to practice law, but once you are admitted, unethical behavior can lead to your disbarment, stripping you of your ability to practice.”

Greg Borderlon, prelaw advisor, said law school applicants should be very cautious as to what they post on Facebook both at the time of application to law schools and during the time that bar authority character and fitness investigations are underway, as early as the first year of law school. “Many students have a false sense of security relying on privacy settings within the program itself and often do not realize that unprotected third-party communications can be used if discovered. There is, for the most part, no constitutional right to privacy in social networking postings. The bottom line is, if you don’t want potential law schools to see it, don’t put it up or be tagged doing it,” Borderlon said.

Thomas added, “Not many other professions have that kind of enforceable code of conduct, so it’s natural that law schools screen more stringently and more often.”

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu