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Last updateWed, 14 Oct 2020 1pm

News

The Journey to Medical School

Examining the Road Taken by Pre-Med Students


default article imageStudents planning to apply to medical school will partake in a journey while at the University that includes student-created clubs and faculty-made committees.

Aside from the core classes that biology majors are expected to take and maintaining a GPA of 3.5, students have to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges, is a standardized multiple choice test that includes problem solving, critical thinking, writing skills and knowledge of science concepts and principles that serve as prerequisites to the study of medicine.

In order to assist students planning to attend medical school, the University’s School of Science formed the Pre-Professional Health Advisory Committee (PPHAC). The PPHAC, formed in 1974 by Dr. James Mack, Director of the PPHAC, and Dr. Dorothy Parker, is responsible for guiding students into careers related to medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and other allied health professions.

“We advise students who are interested in medical school, dental school, vet school, physician assistant programs, physical therapy, osteopathic medicine [and] occupational therapy,” Mack said. “We have one of the best programs in the country, not just in the state. I started this in 1974 with Dr. Parker. There is probably no other program in the country that has somebody on continuously for 38 years. Our other faculty members on the committee are very dedicated to helping the students.”

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New Winner Announced at HERO Ceremony

Prevent drunk driving


HERO Award 1That is the goal of the HERO campaign, which aims to reward designated drivers for their efforts in preventing vehicular alcohol-related accidents and deaths. The campaign was established in 2000 and has been a large part of the University since 2007. The University held the annual HERO of the year award for the third year in a row last Wednesday.

The University Newswire said that the campaign started with Navy Ensign John Elliott from New Jersey, son of HERO campaign founder William Elliott, when he was hit by a drunk driver in 2000. It has grown into a nationwide program to save lives.

Students and faculty were able to nominate others and they also were able to nominate themselves. Four students were nominated for the award. Ryan Clutter, Chris Sikorski, Gary Mejia, and Chelsea Pfender were the contenders. The winner of the award was Mejia followed by second runner up Pfender and third runner up Clutter. Honorable Mention went to Sikorski.

Mejia will be featured on CBS Outdoor’s billboards locally and also will receive $200 to the Monmouth Mall, a HERO teeshirt and a certificate.

Pfender received $100 to Monmouth Mall, a HERO teeshirt and a certificate, while Clutter received $75 to Monmouth Mall, a HERO tee-shirt and a certificate as well. For his honorable mention, Sikorski received $25 to the mall, $10 to Einstein Bagels, a tee-shirt and a certificate.

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Plans Change for New Residence Hall

New Building Not to be for First-Year Students


default article imageThe proposed new residence hall on campus has been changed to house sophomores instead of incoming first year students.

Mary Anne Nagy, Vice President for Student and Community Services, said that the University is planning on having this new building to continue to meet the demands of the current students.

“In particular, we want to be able to guarantee second year students housing just as we do our first year students,” Nagy said. “The building will house approximately 200 students and will be a traditional style building very similar to Mullaney Hall.”

The construction of the building has not started yet. “We will not start until the University receives the proper approval from the local planning board in West Long Branch,” Nagy added.

The building was originally discussed to be for incoming freshmen to try to standardize housing for the first year students. Also, a majority of their housing is already traditional style.

The newest residence hall on campus is Mullaney Hall which was completed in May 2010 for first year students.

Nagy said, “After discussions with several areas, and most importantly our Student Government Association, we are leaning towards having the building used for second year students that may want a more traditional style experience.”

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University to Raise Awareness on Sexual Abuse

default article imageAccording to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, “every two minutes, someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted,” resulting in an average of 207,754 victims each year. In response to this issue, April has been nationally dedicated as Sexual Assault Awareness Month. To recognize this month, the University Counseling and Psychological Services will be hosting activities, workshops, and fundraisers to create sexual assault awareness on college campuses.

On Wednesday, March 21, “Take Back the Night,” will mark the official kick-off of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, explained Dr. Franca Mancini, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services who has worked to coordinate all of the month’s events.

“We hope to raise awareness and participation in events related to the important issue of interpersonal violence and sexual assault,” Mancini said, in hopes that this year will make the biggest impact of all events previously held. “We can accomplish this through events and by identifying students who want to participate and keep the message alive and current throughout the year.”

“Take Back the Night” will be held in the Residential Life Quad and is sponsored by Begin By Believing (BBB), the MU Chapter of the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NJCASA). The event will include a self-defense class at 6:30 pm, followed by a vigil and walk to raise awareness about interpersonal violence at 7:30 pm.

Mancini also mentioned that events will continue throughout the month, including the third annual Denim Day Drive. Beginning in 2010, the University, along with other universities and in collaboration with BBB and the NJCASA, has hosted the Denim Day Drive in efforts of supporting the NJCASA through the donation of jeans to local agencies supporting survivors of interpersonal violence.

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New Twitter Page Shows University Love

default article imageStudents can now add @monmouthulove to their list of Twit- ter pages to follow. Contrary to @ MnmthUProblems, this page allows students to tweet about all the things that they love about being a student at the University.

Mary Harris, a Specialist Professor in the Department of Commu- nication, gave some insight into the negatives and positives of both of these sites.

“A major positive about both the @MnmthUProblems and @ monmouthulove Twitter pages are that [they have] created a sense of community among Monmouth students that may not have existed otherwise,” Harris said. “However, students still need to be mindful about what they post for the world to see. When making public complaints through social media, there is a tactful way of sharing an opinion and then, of course, there is the not-so-tactful way of expressing oneself, which is where trouble can form.”

“I feel like both of these pages are a great benefit to the Monmouth community,” said Thomas Ranzweiler, a junior and Editor-in-Chief of The Verge . “It gives students a way to air out their grievances with Monmouth in a light hearted outlet. It shows just how important social media has become amongst students of our generation. If anything, Monmouth University should look towards these pages for common problems the students have (such as parking) and begin to find a solution. Their once-a-se- mester questionnaires, with no real results, just are not making the cut anymore.”

Many students also expressed their excitement about the University’s newest Twitter page, such as senior Gina Swedin. “I think it’s great that there are both pages,” Swedin said. “It gives all the students a chance to voice their opin- ion whether it is good or bad.”

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Campus Reacts to Kony 2012

Documentary Focuses on Crimes Committed by African Warlord


03.21.12_Page_03_Image_0001In the sweeping landscape of Uganda, a country in Eastern Africa, the hunt for a tyrant in hiding has captured the world’s attention be- cause of a documentary that went vi- ral on March 7. The film, Kony 2012, had over 20 million views in the first 48 hours of its posting; social net- working sites have contributed to the expeditious exposure that the film has received in the first two weeks of its existence.

At 30 minutes long, the documentary informs the viewer of the history of child abduction in Uganda, emphasizes the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) as the group responsible for the atrocious acts and maps out a plan of action to bring LRA’s leader, Joseph Kony, to justice.

Although the war in Uganda has been going on for more than two decades, this is the first time that many are hearing about the ruthlessness that has occurred to children in this part of the world.

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Clementi Case Verdict Sends Bullies a Signal

Gay rights groups, local prosecutors, Rutgers students and others said that the jury on Friday got the Dharun Ravi verdict right, calling the decision an important lesson about what constitutes bullying for a new generation raised on technology that can erode privacy in ways never previously imagined.

The jury found Ravi, 20, a former Rutgers University student, guilty of privacy invasion and bias intimidation by setting up a webcam to watch his roommate, Tyler Clementi, kiss another man in their dorm room in September 2010. Clementi committed suicide days later by jumping off the George Washington Bridge.

"Last night I lost sleep thinking the verdict might have been otherwise," said Steven Goldstein, CEO and chairman of Garden State Equality, the state's largest organization advocating for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. "It is a relief to know the old defense of 'kids will be kids' is over.”

"If the verdict had been different, young adults in this country would have gotten the signal that they can hire fancy high-paid lawyers to argue their clients were just being kids and didn't know what they were doing," he said. "And what a loophole that would have been to every anti-bullying law in the country."

Hayley Gorenberg of Lambda Legal, a national gay and lesbian rights group, said, "The actions of Dharun Ravi were inexcusable and surely added to Tyler Clementi's vulnerability and pain. The verdict demonstrates that the jurors understood that bias crimes do not require physical weapons like a knife in one's hand."

Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli agreed.

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Nuclear Power Protest Passes Through Campus

Nuclear Power Protest 1Shut down all 104 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S. to build a nuclear-free future.

That is the common goal uniting the participants and supporters of the “No More Fukushimas Peace Walk” who recently walked by the University earlier this month. The walk is a response to the destruction caused by the partial meltdown of the nuclear reactor in Fukushima, Japan, that followed the country’s 8.9-magnitude earthquake and tsunami last March. It seeks to raise awareness about the structural similarities between the Fukushima plant and U.S. plants.

“There’s a possibility that the nuclear plant right where [you] live can have an accident and if [it does] it’s unlike any other industry. It leaves permanent damage; it just takes away hope for life which is what’s happening in Japan,” said Edith Gbur, President of Jersey Shore Nuclear Watch, a Toms River-based coalition created in 2000 that seeks the permanent closing of New Jersey’s Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station located just 40 miles from campus. The coalition has partnered with the walk to strengthen the anti-nuclear message.

This year’s walk spanned three states and is scheduled to end today at the nuclear power plant in Brattleboro, VT, known as the Vermont Yankee; it is one of three plants in the northeastern U.S. identified by the walkers as a primary concern due to its structure. The other two include the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant in Buchanan, NY, and the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station where the walk began on March 3 in Forked River, NJ.

About 15 people comprised the walk’s core and traveled the entire distance; however, the walk attracted as many as 60 people depending on location. Among them was Jun Yasuda, a Buddhist nun from Grafton, N.Y., who founded the peace walk shortly after the Japanese disaster. She has been walking to protest nuclear power since 1978 and has completed various cross-country trips since then.

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Majors That Dominate the One Percent

03.21.12_Page_04_Image_0002A recent article featured in The Huffington Post listed the most successful careers and what majors to pursue in undergraduate studies. Titled “What the 1% Majored In,” the article focused on which majors land students in the top one percent of earners in the United States.

The 15 career areas listed are dominated by jobs in business finance and economics, as well as political science and biological sciences. Most of the majors that lead to those careers are offered at the University.

“I think Monmouth has done a good job of providing students with majors that are timely and help to best prepare them for future work. I know that Enrollment Management and the Academic Affairs division work closely to monitor employment trends to determine if our offerings continue to meet the demands of an ever changing world and employer,” said Mary Anne Nagy, Vice President for Student and Community Services. Nagy continued that the University wants employers to see Monmouth as a place where they can find highly qualified graduates who are prepared to handle today’s fast-paced and complex environment

Thomas Pearson, Provost, also said the University regularly looks at career and job forecasts and the initiatives of competing colleges in developing University curricula.

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“Let’s Make It Real, Leap Into Diversity” Event Draws in Campus Community

default article imageThe University is again looking to spread a message of diversity through its annual diversity awareness programs. Two sessions of the program took place last Wednesday at the “Let’s Make It Real, A Leap Into Diversity” event, which began with a one hour introductory session at 1:15 pm and an extended two hour session at 2:30 pm on the second floor of the Rebecca Stafford Student Center.

This event, run by the American Conference on Diversity, was to highlight some of the major issues with and types of discrimination that can take place on a daily basis. The events focus on how to overcome and eliminate the bias some face every day as a result of height, weight, color, creed or orientation, among other factors.

“It was very informative and interactive,” said Judith Nye, Associate Vice President of Academic Foundations and General Education. “[It] addressed some serious issues. I think a lot of folks took away some important insights.”

Nye also commented on the job that the conference is doing. “The American Conference on Diversity is becoming a major force and the University has partnered [with them] on a number of occasions,” she added.

Those in attendance were referred to as participants, rather than audience members, for two reasons. First, everyone was expected to join in group exercises throughout the presentation. Second, everyone participates in practicing diversity whether they promote bias, prohibit it or simply ignore it.

Everyone was told that they would discuss things that would not be pleasant to talk about. Conversation is the key to connection, and connection leads to understanding; this point was emphasized throughout the event.

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Campus to Aid Victims of Brighton Ave. Fire

Brighton Ave Fire“I heard on a walkie-talkie ‘Sue DePinho needs to come to the office, it’s an emergency.’ Suddenly my heart sank and the hallway became a mile long,” DePinho, a University alumnus, recalled.

DePinho had a missed phone call from her boyfriend on the morning of Monday, February 13. DePinho, who teaches Video Production and Photography at Shore Regional High School, was teaching class while her boyfriend, Derek Tranchina, was on his way to their burning apartment on Brighton Avenue in the West End of Long Branch.

DePinho and Tranchina moved in to the apartment about one year ago. “The location was amazing and the rent was affordable enough for the two of us to save for a house,” DePinho said. The apartment was also animal-friendly, perfect for their puppy named Blue. The night before the fire, DePinho said that Blue was up all night, scratching his crate and crying. They let him in bed with them and he was shaking, “which makes us believe that he knew something was going to happen,” DePinho said.

After she talked to someone in the office, she found out about the fire. “Stunned and hysterical, I called Derek, who confirmed that he did run in in time to get Blue, but the fire was bad and we might lose everything,” DePinho recalled.

She then made her way out to the building and nearly collapsed. “I could see the smoke from West Long Branch,” De- Pinho added.

As DePinho and the other residents stood outside, she said that her only question was what to do next. “We did not have insurance and we were basically told that there was nothing that we could do but watch it all burn,” she said.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu