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Last updateFri, 19 Jun 2020 7pm

News

University’s Office of Substance Awareness Offers Free Treatment

default article imageThe Office of Substance Awareness, located in the Health Center next to Birch Hall, provides free, confidential, short-term substance abuse treatment for all students. The Office of Substance Awareness also provides educational information and presents to first-year seminar classes.

The Office of Substance Awareness also reports substance use and abuse trends of concern to the University community. This year, a continuing trend of concern includes designer drugs such as synthetic marijuana. Synthetic marijuana is a laboratory made product attempting to simulate marijuana and its effects. Sold under names such as, K2, Spice and Revelation Ultra; These products are made in China and there is very little known about what short and long term effects these products have on the brain. There have been many health concerns from people smoking these products to get high. We have seen people become sick, lose consciousness and even experience mental health symptoms including psychotic episodes from these types of products.

In addition to synthetic forms of marijuana, another product of concern is bath salts. This was the name given to a synthetic form of methamphetamine. What sounds like an innocent bubble bath product is actually a dangerous substance already banned in many states, including New Jersey as of August 2011.

Alcohol poisoning continues to be a leading concern on campus. According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website, a 2002 study estimates that more than 1,400 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die each year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries and 500,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 sustain unintentional alcohol-related injuries each year. Many students report drinking too much, too fast and experiencing memory blackouts, vomiting, passing out and hangovers. These harmful effects are preventable.

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Professors Trying to Stop Plagiarism

default article imageIn the early weeks of Katelyn Laeyt's freshman year at Ramapo College, a professor sent her class a clear message a classmate's plagiarized essay, each line marked in red, posted on the professor's door.

"You could see everything that was plagiarized," Laeyt said. "The message was, 'Don't do it.'"

Professors across the region say student plagiarism is on the rise, so they must be more creative and direct about how they combat it.

Some use Internet programs like Turnitin.com, the software that flagged passages in Laeyt’s paper that may have come from other sources. Some start the term with presentations about plagiarism and its consequences. Some simply try to be extra vigilant about changes in tone or uncharacteristic writing style in their students' essays.

Unless they are clear and consistent about their policies against plagiarism, professors said, they have no doubt some of their students tempted by the sheer amount of information easily available on the Internet will try it.

"Everyone thinks everyone else is doing it, so they're doing it, too," said Don McCabe, a Professor in the Management and Global Business Department of the Rutgers Business School who has spent the past 20 years studying academic dishonesty.

 "The number of students engaging in the behavior has not increased, but those who are doing it are doing it more often. They used to do it only when they were desperate. Now they do it as a matter of habit."

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University Delegates Attended 26th Annual National Conference on Ethics in America

default article imageDr. Golam M. Mathbor, Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences and a professor in the School of Social Work at the University, was selected to serve as mentor for the 26th annual National Conference on Ethics in America (NCEA).

“Dr. Golam Mathbor was selected as mentor because of his exceptional ability to facilitate discussion and promote ethical awareness,” remarked Lieutenant Colonel Michael Turner, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Simon Center for Professional Military Ethic.

The conference, held on October 16 to 20, was hosted by The Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic and sponsored by the West Point Class of 1970 at the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. The NCEA is a three-day conference involving approximately 180 undergraduate students from over 90 academic institutions and the nation’s service academies. The purpose of the conference is to promote the importance of integrity and ethical conduct in our collegiate, public, and professional communities. Its theme was “Serving with Integrity.”

College student delegates, under the guidance of their group mentors, discussed topics raised by plenary speakers. Mentors guided groups in discussions encouraging a respectful exchange of ideas and their rationale. The mentors introduced delegates to the decision-making methodology while allowing them to explore ethical challenges raised by the speakers.

Mathbor selected two student delegates from the University to participate in this prestigious NCEA event at USMA in consultation with Student Services Vice President MaryAnne Nagy. They were Aziz Mama, a junior accounting major, and Lori Mueller, another junior majoring in psychology and criminal justice.

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Hawk TV Will Launch New Website

default article imageHawk TV will be launching its new website on Wednesday, November 9 in hopes of promoting their programming and events.

Daniel Villanova, the Webmaster for Hawk TV, is in charge of creating the website.

“We are entering into the digital age and offering our viewers a chance to experience Hawk TV in a whole new way,” Villanova said. Hawk TV’s website in use now is “out-of-date” according to Villanova and the new website is a project started from scratch.

“I added a few new options on the new website and made it user-friendly. Most importantly, it will be current,” Villanova said.  

Villanova, who will receive his Information Technology certificate through completing the minor, has been working on the website by himself for eight months.

The website will feature online shows produced by Hawk TV members in an “Online Video Library.” There will also be a TV guide, and biographies of the staff members.

The most important aspect of launching the site is the accessibility, according to Villanova.

“Students will be able to access our work from any computer and any location. As of now, students living on campus were the only ones able to access the channel,” Villanova said.

The website will also feature links to Hawk TV’s social media websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, and their blog on wordpress.com titled “Hawk TV Stories.”

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University Delegates Attended 26th Annual National Conference on Ethics in America Screen reader support enabled.

default article imageDr. Golam M. Mathbor, Associate Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences and a professor in the School of Social Work at the University, was selected to serve as mentor for the 26th annual National Conference on Ethics in America (NCEA).

“Dr. Golam Mathbor was selected as mentor because of his exceptional ability to facilitate discussion and promote ethical awareness,” remarked Lieutenant Colonel Michael Turner, Ph.D., Deputy Director of Simon Center for Professional Military Ethic.

The conference, held on October 16 to 20, was hosted by The Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic and sponsored by the West Point Class of 1970 at the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. The NCEA is a three-day conference involving approximately 180 undergraduate students from over 90 academic institutions and the nation’s service academies. The purpose of the conference is to promote the importance of integrity and ethical conduct in our collegiate, public, and professional communities. Its theme was “Serving with Integrity.”

College student delegates, under the guidance of their group mentors, discussed topics raised by plenary speakers. Mentors guided groups in discussions encouraging a respectful exchange of ideas and their rationale. The mentors introduced delegates to the decision-making methodology while allowing them to explore ethical challenges raised by the speakers.

Mathbor selected two student delegates from the University to participate in this prestigious NCEA event at USMA in consultation with Student Services Vice President MaryAnne Nagy. They were Aziz Mama, a junior accounting major, and Lori Mueller, another junior majoring in psychology and criminal justice.

Read more ...

Tenth Anniversary of 9/11 Lecture to Take Place

Thomas Kean, Former N.J. Governor, to Speak at Program


Tenth Anniversary 9 11 LectureThe University will present the program “9/11, A Ten Year Perspective” on Thursday, November 3 at 4:30 pm in Wilson Hall. With the passing of a decade, this event will allow people to gather at the University and reflect on their own perspectives of the terrorist attacks.

“It is surreal that it has been 10 years already,” said Rebecca Ryan, a senior, who was only 11yearsold on 9/11. “I can’t believe I lived through such a huge tragedy.”

Ryan said that she still recalls exactly where she was as that fateful day unfolded.

“I was in sixth grade English class. I remember my teacher coming into the classroom crying,” she said. “My school had students ranging from kindergarten to eighth grade. She was not allowed to tell us anything. We kept asking, ‘What’s wrong?,’ but she never said.”

Ryan said that her mother had picked her up from school, which struck her as unusual. When she asked her mom to tell her was going on, she explained what had happened to the World Trade Center. Ryan spent the rest of the day watching the smoking towers fall on every news station.

“9/11, A Ten Year Perspective” will have a variety of speakers including former New Jersey Governor Thomas H. Kean, who was chair of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks after 9/11.

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Facebook Affecting Law School Applicants

default article imageA recent study by Kaplan Test Prep has found that 41 percent of law school admission officers perform a Google search of their applicants before admission, while 37 percent use Facebook to check out a potential student. This is compared to 20 percent of college admissions officers and 27 percent of business school admissions officers.

Jeff Thomas, Director of prelaw programs at Kaplan Test Prep, says this is justifiable behavior for the admission process.

“Despite jokes and negative stereotyping of lawyers, the reality is that the legal community takes ethics among its members very seriously,” Thomas said. “You not only have to be accepted to a state bar to practice law, but once you are admitted, unethical behavior can lead to your disbarment, stripping you of your ability to practice.”

Greg Borderlon, prelaw advisor, said law school applicants should be very cautious as to what they post on Facebook both at the time of application to law schools and during the time that bar authority character and fitness investigations are underway, as early as the first year of law school. “Many students have a false sense of security relying on privacy settings within the program itself and often do not realize that unprotected third-party communications can be used if discovered. There is, for the most part, no constitutional right to privacy in social networking postings. The bottom line is, if you don’t want potential law schools to see it, don’t put it up or be tagged doing it,” Borderlon said.

Thomas added, “Not many other professions have that kind of enforceable code of conduct, so it’s natural that law schools screen more stringently and more often.”

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Mt. Vernon Nazarene University Models EOF Program after Monmouth

EOF Model Midwest CollegeA panel of Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) students met last Tuesday morning with staff from Mt. Vernon Nazarene University (MVNU) in Ohio, in a collaborative effort to start a program that mirrors the University’s.

On November 2, 2010, EOF Director Colleen Johnson and Dean of the Center for Student Success, Dr. Mercy Azeke, traveled to Mobile, Alabama for the Sixth Annual National Symposium on Student Retention. There, Johnson presented a paper written by herself, Azeke, and history and anthropology professor Dr. Richard Veit, titled “Building for Success: A Model for Improving Retention and Building Diversity through the Educational Opportunity Fund.”

Also present at last November’s symposium, among representatives from numerous schools across the country, was John Ballenger, Director of Student Success at MVNU.

“Ballenger thought [Johnson’s] program would best suit [MVNU’s] needs, and he chose to reach out to Colleen,” said Albert Fure, a longtime math specialist for the University’s EOF department.

At the request of MVNU’s President Dr. Daniel Martin and inspired by the paper, Ballenger reached out to the University. Upon Ballenger’s request, Johnson made arrangements for him and Dr. Bradley Whitaker, professor of mathematics at MVNU, to visit the University and meet with EOF staff and students which took place last Monday.

In attendance were Provost Dr. Thomas Pearson, Azeke, Director of First Year Advising Debbie Kavourias, Vice President for Student & Community Services Mary Ann Nagy, Director of the Writing Center Jane DeTullio, Admission Counselor Andrew Amendola and Assistant Director of Financial Aid Robert Hennessey.

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University Hosts First Public Relations Panel

default article imageThe University hosted its first public relations focus panel on October 25. The panel, “Today’s Public Relations Strategy: Tools of the Trade for Effective Online News,” featured an array of local professionals in both the public relations and journalism fields.

The event was held in the Magill Commons Club Dining Room from 9:00 am to 11:00 am. Over 40 students, faculty, and public relations and journalism professionals piled into the event, which was organized by Kristine Simoes, a Public Relations Specialist Professor.

The focus of the panel was to help expose the new tides of the industry from the point of view of local public relations and journalism professionals. These panel members discussed topics such as the changing of the industry and also highlighted new tools being used within both fields.

A big topic of discussion among panel members was tips for students entering the professional world. According to Kristine Brown, the Director of Public Relations for Barnabas Health, “the greatest skill PR professionals can have is the ability to develop relationships; get out there and start networking.”

Judy M. Feeney is the Digital Editor for NJ Press Media as well as for the Asbury Park Press. When questioned about skills she looks for in potential job candidates, she stressed the importance of spelling. She also went on to say, “I cannot stress how important writing is.”

Students were also given tips on how to better prepare themselves for life outside of college, more specifically job interviews. Advice given by the panel members ranged from making eye contact and engaging with the interviewer, to making sure that students are accessible for all facets of the industry.

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Time is Foe for Older Students

default article imageAlicia Graham has her entire day planned to the minute from the time her children get on the school bus to when she gets to work to what time see gets to class, and how much time she has to cook and clean before getting her homework done for the next day.

"It's a challenge. I find myself overwhelmed sometimes by everything I have to do," said Graham, 38, of Englewood, N.J., who is a single mother working toward her college degree.

For her, time is a commodity that is extremely hard to come by. And according to a new study, as a college student she is not alone.

According to the findings of the nonprofit organization Complete College America, 75 percent of students today are college commuters, juggling families, jobs and school.

The major factor preventing many from completing their degrees is time or to be more exact, the lack of it.

These completing demands are forcing many of today's students to stay in school longer which, according to the study, can severely hurt their chances of actually completing their degrees.

"As the clock runs, students' lives fill up with jobs, relationships, marriages, children and mortgages. The list goes on and on," said the founder of Complete College America, Stan Jones.

And with the majority of students taking at least six years to complete a bachelor's degree, Jones said it's time that colleges rethink the way they structure their programs.

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Remembrance Event and Roll Call Set for Veteran’s Day

default article imageThis Veteran’s Day, a seemingly endless amount of names will be read for approximately eight hours as a part of the University’s service to honor U.S. veterans.

This service will occur from 9:30 am to 5:30 pm on November 11 at the Rebecca Strafford Student Center.

A moment of silence will be held at 2:00 pm as sign of remembrance.

The University has joined a nationwide effort to honor service men and women who gave their lives while serving in Afghanistan and Iraq during the past 10 years.

At the moment, 157 other colleges and universities from across the nation will read the names of the more than 6,000 casualties of war who have perished during operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

“We wanted to rally campus communities across the nation to send a powerful message to the troops currently serving that their peers have not forgotten their sacrifices, or those of the fallen,” said Lt. Col. Brett Morris, the National Roll Call Coordinator.

“We will be reading the names of every military member who lost their lives in support of operations overseas since 9/11/01. They come from all over the United States,” said Jeffrey Hood, the Veterans Service Coordinator at the University. “This is the first year we will be doing the roll call. I expect it to be something we do every year because it is important to remember those who gave their lives.”

The reading of all the names is expected to take close to eight hours to complete. The names will be read in chronological order.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu