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Last updateMon, 29 Apr 2019 1pm

News

Kortney Rose Foundation Holds GUC 5K

default article imageIt was perfect weather for the third Annual Global Understanding 5K on University’s campus on Friday, April 6, 2012 to benefit pediatric brain tumor research through The Kortney Rose Foundation (KRF). With close to 100 participants, it was the largest turnout for this event to date. The beauty of the campus lends itself to a wonderful venue for this event. The 5K event caps off the Global Understanding Convention which is a week full of events open to the campus and public, which brings light to global events. This year’s convention was titled “Freedom, Sustainability, and Security: Creating Interconnected and Inclusive Communities.”

David Wong was the first man to finish in 19:07 and student Jenna Intersimone was the first female to finish with a time of 21:25. We would like to thank the sponsors of the event, the Institute for Global Understanding, The Political Science Club, the Sociology Club, Aramark, Monmouth Athletic Department, and Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc. for their support. A very special thank you is needed for the generosity of both Professor Peter Reinhart, Director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute and Professor Joe Patten, Chair of the Department of Political Science and Sociology. Both professors offered a challenge to all participants that they would donate money to the KRF for each person who finished before them. Thanks to their generosity and the support of those who participated, $1500 was raised to benefit pediatric brain tumor research through KRF.

Kristen Gillette, Founder and President of The Kortney Rose Foundation said, “We are so grateful to the Monmouth campus community, and beyond, for their support of this event to Help Get Brain Tumors Off Kids’ Minds.”

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International Guest Speakers Hit the Keynote on Global Issues

GUC Keynote World Crimes 1The 11th Annual Global Understanding Convention’s keynote address took place in Wilson Hall on Tuesday, April 3. The speech focused on this year’s theme of Freedom, Sustainability and Security: International Criminal Law and Human Rights.

The event attracted over 400 attendees, including faculty, students and administrators. As the audience was being seated, junior Meredith Calcagno and sophomore Michael Rosas performed a musical prelude along with Laura DuBois, a professor in the Music and Theatre Department.

The keynote speech welcomed two speakers, Raymond Brown and Wanda Akin, who are the co-founders of the International Justice Project. The two speakers are also are married to each other.

During their keynote address, the speakers touched upon the current situation in Darfur, the implications caused by blood diamonds in Sierra Leone, the KONY movement, the work of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the struggles that women face in war-torn regions of the world.

Their non-profit organization was established in 2004 with the purpose of providing support to victims of world crimes such as genocides, war crimes and crimes against humanity. The organization also conducts outreach and educated survivors, human rights advocates, activists and other organizations about the ICC, international criminal law, human rights and the current situation in Darfur, according to internationaljusticeproject. com.

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Students are Educated on Diversity in the Workplace

default article imageHow do different cultures communicate with each other?

That’s the question that Dr. Don Swanson, Chair of the University’s Philosophy, Religion and Interdisciplinary Studies Department, tried to answer during a seminar entitled “Challenges of Cross-Cultural Communication.” Swanson held the seminar in conjunction with Global Understanding Convention.

Swanson presented a slideshow trying to answer the questions of “How do people with different cultural backgrounds work in the workplace together?” He viewed the question as a case study and brought up examples from when he spent time in Guam.

Swanson was the Dean at the University of Guam, but he also worked with a company helping the workers to communicate better and understand the different cultures.

There were several different job titles that had people of different cultures working together. The managers in the company were either American or Japanese.

The middle managers consisted of Americans, Australians, Koreans, Filipinos, Chamorros (people indigenous to the Mariana Islands) and Chi. The number of nationalities represented at the University of Guam represent the U.S. territory’s diversity, as only 12 percent of its population is Caucasian. With all of these different cultures trying to work together in the same place, Swanson explained that “patience and tolerance” are the keys.

Swanson also spoke about the different ways that cultures think. Americans follow individualism while other cultures follow collectivism. Eighty percent of the world is collectivists, meaning that Americans are the minority, Swanson said.

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Panel Discussion Brings Awareness to Unknown Global Issues

default article imageThe Global Understanding Convention continued with “Diversity and the Interworking’s of Cultural Politics,” a panel discussion hosted by the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) early last week. The panel sought to raise awareness concerning several global issues, all of which involve the United States yet remain unknown to many Americans.

Tess La Fera, one of the event’s presenters who serves as the Secretary of LASO and office assistant in the Institute for Global Understanding, mentioned the importance of making these issues known to others.

“We live in a global world and there’s no escaping the eminency of the consequences, both positive and negative,” La Fera said. “Should we choose to enclose ourselves in a bubble and ignore the impact that we have on the rest of the world, as well as the impact the rest of the world has on us, we are only harming our own future security and well-being.”

In addition to La Fera, other presenters included Professor Gisela Cordero of the Foreign Language Department and Dr. Rosemary Barbera, Associate Director of the Institute for Global Understanding. Throughout the panel discussion, each speaker addressed a different issue that is currently affecting several nations.

The first issue, as presented by Cordero, concerned the damaging effects that U.S. oil drilling has had on the people of the Amazon. The drilling of American oil companies, including Texaco and Chevron, is leaving Amazon farmers with contaminated land and severe health issues, including a variety of cancers, Cordero said.

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Seminar Highlights Effects of Global Warming on Oceans

default article imageThe University community was introduced to the growing problem occurring in the ocean through a seminar entitled “Sea Change: Imagine a World Without Fish” last Wednesday as a part of the Global Understanding Convention. The event consisted of a film viewing followed by a presentation and discussion led by Dr. Matthew Poach, a Marine Biochemist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Ursula Howson, a professor of biology, began the program with an introduction to the film “A Sea Change.” The documentary “investigates how ocean acidification will affect future generations,” Howson said. According to the NOAA, ocean acidification is a process through which carbon dioxide is absorbed by the ocean and changes the chemistry in the water. As described by the film, ocean acidification is “the ‘flipside’ of global warming.”

The documentary featured Sven Huseby, a retired history teacher who, after reading an article about ocean acidification, became worried that his grandchildren would be affected by the changes. The film documents Huseby’s efforts to research the causes and effects of the issue, as well as how it can be fixed.

As presented to the audience, the film explains that the world’s oceans have absorbed 188 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide in the last 200 years, with 22 million tons being absorbed every day. As a result, oceans are becoming increasingly acidic. With these rapid chemical changes, oceanic species are unable to adapt to the ocean’s high levels of acidity.

The documentary also included commentary from scientists who fear a mass extinction of the coral reefs. In the film, Huseby asks, “Are we screwed?” to which oceanographers respond, “Yes, to a considerable extent.” It also mentioned that scientists recognize ocean acidification as an “irreversible experiment” that could result in mass oceanic extinction anywhere from 30 to 300 years from now if the problem continues.

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University Members Hold Rally to End Use of Child Soldiers

default article imageA rally to end the use of child soldiers was held on the steps of Wilson Hall early last Thursday. Students and faculty gathered to pay homage to children ages five to 15 who face torture, rape, crimes and even post-traumatic stress disorder.

The rally also was held as a part of the United Nations Academic Impact initiative, which is “a global initiative that aligns institutions of higher education with the United Nations in actively supporting 10 universally accepted principles in areas of human rights, literacy, sustainability and conflict resolution,” according to its website. The initiative urges students to share information about child soldiers.

According to sources such as Amnesty International, the Child Soldiers Report of 2008, and Conventions on the Rights of a Child, the Revolutionary Armed Forces, National Liberation Army of Columbia, Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam/Sri Lanka and the Lord’s Resistance Army of Uganda have been using children for years. However, there are other armed forces that use children in Thailand, India, the Philippines and Myanmar, among other countries.

Oscar Sanchez, a junior communication major, helped organize the event along with Tess La Fera, a member of the Institute for Global Understanding.

“People need to find something they are passionate about. They should do something, have something to stand for,” Sanchez said. “This will create a better campus community and an overall a better world; spread the word.”

La Fera said that the event was a response to the Kony 2012 documentary that recently went viral. She commented that people must understand that the forcing of children to become child soldiers is a violation of human rights and awareness must be raised.

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New Physicians Assistant Program Underway

default article imageA new Master’s of Science Physician Assistant Program will be launched since approval by the University’s Graduate Studies Committee was granted last month. The hope for the program is for it to be launched in the fall of 2014, said Janet Mahoney, Dean of Nursing and Health Studies.

Physician assistants are trained to aid doctors in varied health and preventative care services. With a master’s degree in this field, students can work in internal and emergency medicine, as well as gynecology, orthopedics and pediatrics among others.

“There is increasing interest among pre-health students in pursuing a career as a P.A.,” said Dr. James Mack, Director of the University’s Pre-Professional Health Advisory Committee. “The job market for a P.A. position is growing explosively.”

The new program would offer students a chance to study for a master’s degree in this field on campus as opposed to the current agreement with Seton Hall University in which six seats are saved each year for University students. Currently, University students must apply before or during their first or second year to be considered for this program.

Even though the program has already been approved, it is still too early for exact details on what the program will include, Mahoney said.

“Based on demand for P.A. at other universities and high applicants/ available seats ratio, it is expected that a large number of qualified students will apply for the [new] program,” Mack said. The program is expected to be competitive, as most schools that offer it only accept about 25 to 30 students per semester. “The P.A. programs are usually highly selective, somewhat similar to M.S. or D.O. programs,” Mack added.

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University to Host 16th Annual NJCA Conference

default article imageWEST LONG BRANCH, NJ – “Communication in Action: Open¬ing Doors to Create Change” is the theme for the 16th Annual New Jersey Communication Association Conference hosted by Monmouth University. The event will take place on April 14 at 8:00 a.m. in Woodrow Wilson Hall and is open to New Jersey students, faculty and public relations practitioners.

The NJCA, established in 1997, is a non-profit organization dedi¬cated to the open exchange of ideas, information and research about communication. Their mission is to promote, sustain and recognize excellence in communication scholarship, research and application; to provide a network for fellowship, contacts and professional oppor¬tunities; to provide a forum for student participation in an academic and professional environment and many others.

This year’s conference consists of informative panel discussions incorporating the key elements of social media, networking and the communication industry as a whole. The event will close with a keynote address that will be given by Lawrence (Larry) R. Frey, a Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Monmouth University and NJCA encourages all students and fac¬ulty to attend the event in order to provide immense opportunities for the university’s emerging graduates. You can follow the NJCA on Facebook and LinkedIn and make sure to be on the lookout for a Twitter hash tag for live tweeting at the conference!

National Student Employment Appreciation Week

default article imageNational Student Employment Appreciation Week is just around the corner and Student Employee Appreciation Day is next Wednesday, April 11! Why is everyone so excited? All student employees who visit the giveaway table in the Student Center will win a prize, enter to win raffle prizes, take a chance at a candy guess, enjoy free brownies, munchkins, homemade cookies and cupcakes! Special guests include The Vitamin Shoppe and MU’s Shadow! The Monmouth University Pep Band will perform, as well as the Caribbean band Verdict.

Thank you to Monmouth’s 1,300+ student employees!

For more information on Student Employee Appreciation Day or the “Deck Your Door” Competition and the entire week’s events please call Student Employment at 732-571-3569.

Final Panel Topics Are Decided For 2nd Annual NJCA Conference

default article imageThe Global Understanding Convention continued with “Diversity and the Interworking’s of Cultural Politics,” a panel discussion hosted by the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) early last week. The panel sought to raise awareness concerning several global issues, all of which involve the United States yet remain unknown to many Americans.

Tess La Fera, one of the event’s presenters who serves as the Secretary of LASO and office assistant in the Institute for Global Understanding, mentioned the importance of making these issues known to others.

“We live in a global world and there’s no escaping the eminency of the consequences, both positive and negative,” La Fera said. “Should we choose to enclose ourselves in a bubble and ignore the impact that we have on the rest of the world, as well as the impact the rest of the world has on us, we are only harming our own future security and wellbeing.”

In addition to La Fera, other presenters included Professor Gisela Cordero of the Foreign Language Department and Dr. Rosemary Barbera, Associate Director of the Institute for Global Understanding. Throughout the panel discussion, each speaker addressed a different issue that is currently affecting several nations.

The first issue, as presented by Cordero, concerned the damaging effects that U.S. oil drilling has had on the people of the Amazon.

The drilling of American oil companies, including Texaco and Chevron, is leaving Amazon farmers with contaminated land and severe health issues, including a variety of cancers, Cordero said.

Read more ...

The Outlook Launches New Website and Mobile Site

default article imageAfter months of preparation and a collaboration of ideas, The Outlooklaunched their new website and mobile site this morning, April 4, to upgrade the online presence of the publication.

The new and interactive website, located at the same web address (outlook.monmouth.edu) features a multimedia design which compliments the stories appearing in the print edition in an online format. All stories can now be shared on social media sites, including Facebook and Twitter.

The website has been constructed by Sarah Oseroff, a junior business management major, and Josh Silva, a junior business management/marketing major. Web design began in February 2012.

“It is really neat seeing all of our ideas come to life on the Internet. It’s nice to be behind the scenes at The Outlook,” Oseroff said.

Any smartphone and/or tablet can view The Outlook’s mobile site by typing in the web address in the browser. The mobile site can also be accessed via the Monmouth University app by scrolling to ‘links’ and then selecting ‘The Outlook’ from the drop down menu. Appearing in a quick-access format, stories can be instantly located by tapping on a specific section – whether it be news, lifestyles, sports, entertainment, etc.

John Morano, professor of journalism who has advised the paper for over 20 years, said, “This is a new era for The Outlook.It’s exciting, it’s timely, and it’s ahead of the curve of where not only many college newspapers are but quite frankly, many professional ones as well. Josh and Sarah have done an incredible job bringing the paper into this new frontier.”

The new format came about after the e-board decided to expand its publication online, allowing mobile access and convenience for readers. “The goal was to make it more user friendly and more attractive so that we were up to date with other schools and to incorporate our social media. I was looking to include video and more multimedia aspects to make it more interactive,” Oseroff said.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu