Tue10242017

Last updateWed, 18 Oct 2017 8am

Online Exclusive

Volume 85 (Fall 2013 - Spring 2014)

Meatless at MU: Is It For You? || News

Dollar Big Macs after midnight. Phat Spruces. Chicken Quesadillas and Steak Burritos. These all become things of the past once you convert to a vegetarian diet, but do not stop for a second to think this diet will come without great benefits. A plant-based diet not only contributes to better health and weight management, but also it benefits the environment. For individuals who have an extensive taste for different foods, a vegetarian diet on the University's campus is feasible.

According to the Journal of the American Dietetic Association (2009), a vegetarian diet is linked with low blood cholesterol levels and reduced risk of heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, a vegetarian diet is typically associated with a lower Body Mass Index (BMI), and lower cancer rates.

As less red meat and more plant-based foods are eaten, a vegetarian consumes less saturated fats and cholesterol, which are only found in animal-products. Vegetarians also take in more dietary fiber, magnesium, phytochemicals, and vitamin C than non-vegetarians.

Many fear a vegetarian diet because they believe deficiencies are developed in areas such as protein, iron, and vitamin B-12. However, Mary Harris, Director of the Monmouth Area Vegetarian Society (MAVS) and specialist communication professor, described the protein deficit as a misconception when stating, "Most of what the general public has been taught about protein requirements in general is a myth. Protein can be found in all plant foods". Harris continues, "Some sources of protein include: lentils, chickpeas, black beans, tempeh, nuts and seeds, tofu, seitan, quinoa, oats, peas, spinach, broccoli, and the list goes on and on". Additionally, many foods today are fortified with nutrients.

Another myth about vegetarian diets is that they are more costly. However, Dr. Null and Dr. Feldman refute this myth in the Townsend Letter. They write, "... A consumer may pay more than five times the price for steak (versus a loaf of whole-wheat bread), a food that does not rival its cheaper counterpart in terms of nutritional value and fiber content". A healthier diet that can be less expensive may be more alluring to a college student with a dearth of money.

Read more ...

Debate Team Coaches Asbury Park Debate Teams to Playoff Rounds || Club & Greek

The University Debate team coached the Asbury Park debate team to a 4th place award at a debate tournament at the Institute for Collaborative Education in New York City this weekend. The Asbury team was coached after school every Tuesday afternoon by MU debaters Dan Roman, Kelly Craig, Sam Maynard, Jessica Roberts, Dylan Maynard, Ryan Kelly, Danielle Doud, Angela Ryan, Michelle Grushko, Saliha Younas, Monica Santos, Michael Hamilton, and Nick Whittaker.  The MU debaters took the Asbury debaters to three weekend tournaments affiliated with New York's Urban Debate League this year, but the third proved to be the charm as this was the first time the Asbury team made into the playoff rounds.  The Asbury team of Amaris Williams and Sharif James took a 4th place trophy after being coached throughout the year by MU debaters Kelly Craig and Dylan Maynard. Amaris Williams also took a 5th place individual speaking award.

Read more ...

‘Tis the Season for Hot Chocolate || Club & Greek

Tis_the_season_hot_chocolateThe Monmouth University Street Team, (MUST) celebrated "National Hot Chocolate Day," by serving free hot chocolate to over 850 students and faculty members, outside the Rebecca Stafford Student Center (RSSC) on Thursday, Dec. 12.

MUST continued their vision to create situations that encourage people to think and talk about big, meaningful things, while promoting positive outlook on life. Every month, MUST decides on a "theme" for their event, and for the month of December, the theme was "celebrate".

MUST President Ryan Murphy explained the process for choosing a theme each month by saying, "There are certain aspects of life that we would like to promote on campus, things that we think might be lacking in daily conversation... Along with the holidays we wanted to promote the idea of 'celebration,' in a different way than we normally do it in the holiday season."

MUST were stationed in front of the RSSC passing out hot chocolate to students and faculty passing by who needed to warm up during the cold winter day. Those who did take advantage of the free hot chocolate were able to customize their drinks to their own liking by adding peppermint, marshmallows, caramel squares and whipped cream to their drinks.

Read more ...

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Making Money or Making a Difference? || News

Companies have profited millions of dollars by raising awareness for breast cancer, yet in 20 years the question of how to cure breast cancer still remains unanswered.

Barbara A. Brenner, Executive Director of Breast Cancer Action, located in San Francisco, CA, said, "Breast cancer is the poster child for cause-marketing."

Cause marketing is an agreement made upon the partnership of a non-profit charitable organization and for-profit organization in an effort to promote their business, sell products and donate a percentage to a good cause.

As stated in an article titled "We Can't Waste Another October: End Pinkwashing and Stop Cancer Before It Starts," Astra Zeneca, a pharmaceutical company, began the epidemic of BCAM. Zeneca distributes cancer treatments as well as carcinogenic pesticides.

BCAM has eventually become a profit month for corporations that promote their effort to spread awareness by selling their own products.

Joseph F. Rocereto, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing in the department of marketing and international business, said, "In a world where resources are necessary to advance any cause, those both noble as well as malicious, cause marketing represents an opportunity for nonprofits to enhance their contributions to those who rely on them, and to society as a whole."

Eighty-five percent of consumers were willing to support a company when the proceeds benefit causes they care about, according to the National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC).

Read more ...

Placing the Cambell’s Soup Can Back onto the Canvas: Why “ARTPOP” is the Most Innovative Lady Gaga Record to Date || Entertainment

"I try to sell myself but I am really laughing, because I just love the music, not the bling." Gaga doesn't write music for the charts, but for the most honest and raw parts of both her conscious and unconscious. This lyric to the title track of Lady Gaga's new album, "ARTPOP," captures the true message of the album as a gestalt and uniform project. Currently sitting atop the Billboard Hot 100, "ARTPOP" is Gaga's most innovative and unique album to date.

As described by Gaga herself, the album is designed as "a trip" from track 1-15, each song on the album is meant to be a different adrenaline rush." The production team for ARTPOP is perhaps her best yet. EDM artists Zedd and Madeon produced five of the 15 tracks on the album, Paul "DJ White Shadow" Blair, a past collaborator on Gaga's preceding album, "Born This Way," produced eight tracks on the album, WILL.I.AM produced the track "Fashion!," and Rick Rubin, one of the executive producers on Eminem's most recent release, produced the melancholic track "Dope."

The songs themselves are unlike anything currently on Top 40 Radio, which shows Gaga's versatility as an artist. The opening track "Aura" is a euphoric track that positions "ARTPOP" to be an extremely ambitious record.

As the album progresses, you are taken on a journey to space in a song that Gaga completely wrote and produced herself: "Venus." Throughout the album, Gaga engages in "genre tripping." This is delving into genres that used to be unknown territories. Songs such as "Jewels & Drugs" with a cast of contemporary and retro rappers: T.I., Too $hort, and Twista, and her current single "Do What U Want," featuring R. Kelly, show both her diverse vocal range, and ability to adapt with different collaborators. Moreover, songs such as "Swine," lack lyrical quality, but make up in the production department with engaging beats that are sure to wake you up when listened through headphones.

Read more ...

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu