Sun06252017

Last updateTue, 20 Jun 2017 11pm

Editorial

Should You Graduate to a Higher Degree?

These days, it seems we are at a point where getting a college degree seems almost necessary in order to succeed in life. Just don’t ask Mark Zuckerburg, Bill Gates or Steve Jobs to back me up on that one. But is the job market so competitive right now that a mere bachelor’s degree is not enough to set you apart from everyone else?

The general consensus here at The Outlook was that it really depends on what field you are looking to work in. For example, those looking to teach at all levels would be significantly better off with a master’s degree. But where does that leave the rest of us?

There are two streams of thought on the topic. The first being that more education, grad-school, can only make you smarter and better you in the long run. Much like college, graduate school is something we as students make a choice to go to in order to get an education. A deeper understanding within your field will make you that much more of an asset to perspective job opportunities.

One factor which comes into play, one we face with many things in life, including college, is money. Is paying for school for another two years or so even doable for most students already deep into student loan debt?

Some of us at The Outlook feel that if you are a hard enough worker and skilled enough in your field then ultimately you will find a job.

Read more ...

Keeping Up With the Train of Technology

Throughout their years at Monmouth, there is one phrase that every student has said at least once: “I get so many emails!” However, with the new email system, upgraded from Squirrel Mail, students can hope that their email page will look so nice that they won’t mind getting blasted with tons of emails from the University every single day. We can also hope this could be the start of a positive technological infrastructure at the University.

Some students signed up to test the new email system, which visually appears very similar to Microsoft Outlook. If the test gains positive results, all students will retire from their time with Squirrel Mail and will have access to the new system, which offers a more modern appearance.

Squirrel Mail has been a frequent complaint with students, as has been other technological aspects of the University. The mail system appears outdated and juvenile, and it is time for an upgrade, especially at a distinguished school such as Monmouth University.

Graphics only appear as attachments in emails, making some messages that are meant to look classy and upbeat appear to be messy and unprofessional. When graphics are included as attachments rather than directly in an email, there is also more of a likelihood that they will be missed by the audience they are trying to reach. It is not likely that many busy students are going to bother downloading a separate attachment from an email that they do not necessarily need to see.

Read more ...

Making a Case Against Affirmataive Action

Affirmative action is a program that began during World War II when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order barring discrimination in the federal government and by war industries. This was the first step towards equality. During the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960’s, this program picked up again during the civil rights movement. This program was intended to allow equal opportunities for minority races and eventually genders. Since the Nixon administration, however, some colleges have used it to make sure there is diversity on college campuses.

There have been multiple cases about whether this is a form of racism or merely giving other races a fair shot at an education. In the landmark case, Regents v. Bakke, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that state colleges and universities could not leave a certain amount of spaces for minority applicants. This case did not solve the problem. The ruling also said that race could be used as a “positive factor” in determining whether someone should be admitted into a place of higher learning. This applied to both public and private colleges and universities.

Coming up during the Supreme Court term this year is Fisher v. University of Texas. This is the most recent affirmative action case. In this case, a white female student, Abigail Fisher, believes she was denied admission to the University of Texas based on her race. In the state of Texas, students in the top 10 percent of their high school’s class gain admission to any public university in the state. There is no race consideration with the top 10 percent. Fisher barely missed the cut off and was put into a group of general applicants where race plays a role into admission. According to Julian Williams, Director of Affirmative Action and Human Relations at the University, affirmative action standards are not used at the University. “The University uses a race blind and gender blind test where we choose our students solely based on their credentials.”

Read more ...

Participate More Outside the Classroom

Student enrichment is important in any university. However, not everyone likes to get involved. Some students will not go beyond the required work for their major. Maybe they would get more involved with their majors if they were given credit for doing work outside of standard curriculum. This is exactly what the University does with the practicum credit, but they are only for certain majors. Not every field has practicum credit as a requirement. Nevertheless, some of us at The Outlook feel like this should change.

If a student can graduate college with a deeper understanding of their major and have actual first-hand experience, that person will be more likely to get hired. Businesses today do not just want people with a degree; they want people that have real experience in the work field before they finish their education.

Communication majors at the University are required to take a one credit practicum. For the students interested in journalism, their practicum includes writing seven stories to be published in The Outlook. This gives students the experience of writing for a real newspaper and dealing with the stress of journalism like deadlines and finding reliable sources.

However, not everyone on staff feels that a practicum should be required. Some feel that there are enough clubs aimed at specific majors that can benefit students so that any further outside work is unnecessary. The students getting “forced” to participate are taking positions away from people who could potentially really want that spot.

Read more ...

Hawks Should Soar Above Flames

The sidewalk along Brighton Avenue that was covered in a pile of concrete rubble and twisted steel following last week’s fire is the same sidewalk that has been walked countless times by some of The Outlook’s editors during their weekly trips to the local establishments from their apartments along Ocean Avenue.

Prior to the fire, the sight of Brighton Avenue near its Ocean Avenue intersection were largely taken for granted. However, after finally comprehending the shock associated with viewing the damage to this familiar area, The Outlook’s editors have been reevaluating their feelings about the surrounding community.

Obviously, we are connected to the surrounding community through our education at the University. However, our bond with local neighborhoods and businesses should go further than this, especially for those of us who moved here to receive a higher education.

Last week’s fire might have bred destruction, but it also delivered an important message. The surrounding community is more than just a playground that we inhabit during our college years. The fact of the matter is that the University and its surrounding neighborhoods have become our homesaway from home. We may not have moved here until we turned 18, but by the time we graduate we will still have done a considerable amount of maturing here. During that time, we need to respect the setting in which we form our college memories.

Read more ...

New Dormitory Houses Different Opinions

One thing students might worry about when coming to campus is finding a place to live. With the limited housing available for campus dorms, trying to get a place could be harder than studying for a midterm. Yet, with the recent announcement that a new dorm is being built, it seems like incoming and/or returning students might have one less problem to worry about. However, the idea that this new dorm is intended for freshman might not be as well received equally.

First off, the benefit of having a new dorm on campus is the sense of having guaranteed housing. Although it might not be a total guarantee, a new number of living spaces on campus could help to even the odds for new and returning students.

Additionally, it demonstrates how the increasing number of incoming students is being addressed by the University. They see that the best way to match the number of high school students interested in attending the University is to find a way to create additional housing. With more living spaces, there’s the possibility that these students might choose to attened the University rather than another institution.

Furthermore, having a new dorm shows that the campus is continually growing. It’s great to see the University wondering how they can continue to either fix an issue like on-campus housing or working to improve the University’s look. Surely, students remember when the new science building was being built and how nice it appears on campus now. It will be interesting to see how the new dorm adds to the campus’ aesthetics and improves upon them.

Read more ...

Are Freshmen Becoming More Serious?

With the rise of unemployment in our country, some researchers are also seeing a rise in maturity levels of college freshmen. According to the recent “American Freshman” poll, 85.9 percent of first year students in the United States said that being able to land a job is the most important reason for attending college.

According to an article by Larry Gordon on MCT Campus Wire, this is the strongest response to the question in 40 years and is sharply higher than the 70.4 percent in 2006 before the recession began. Most of the editors at The Outlook think otherwise.

The first year at college is still a wakeup call for most students. It’s the year during which they are re-establishing themselves within their social circles and figuring out who they really are. It’s the year of big transitions and big changes in a student’s life which essentially makes them more focused on dealing with those changes, than landing a job after college. They are more concerned with being accepted by their new friends and finally being able to have “freedom” away from parents or guardians. To most first-year students, freshman year is about testing boundaries, when they should be focused on attaining their degree.

The majority of us had to take general education classes that are usually filled with first year students. We came to a conclusion that their attitude really takes a long time to snap into college mode. Most of the students still treated the coursework with a high school attitude. Several of them were more concerned with where the party is the upcoming Thursday rather than the paper due on that same day.

Read more ...

In Sports We Trust?

The 2011 NFL season has been overflowing with “Tebowmania.” The unorthodox quarterback of the Denver Broncos has pulled off miracle wins throughout the course of the season and he has not sheltered his religious beliefs from the media. In press conferences he’s sure to thank “the Lord” for each win and he has become famous for getting down on one knee during games and praying to God.

He has been praised about being a great role model for kids. Many people love the idea of having a “good Christian boy” that several people through the world can look up to.

This has sparked an issue that has not been present in the media for quite some time. It is the idea of the role of religion in sports and whether or not it belongs there.

First off, Tim Tebow is not the first athlete to make his religious beliefs known. For example, pitchers in baseball have been seen giving themselves the sign of the cross before they step on the mound and when batters hit a home run, how many times have you see that athlete touch home and point up to the sky? Basically, these religious gestures are something that occur all the time.

So if they occur all of the time then why has Tebow taken the world by the storm? The answer is simple. He always talks about his beliefs in God and has been one of the most if not the most outspoken professional athletes in regards to religion.

Read more ...

Before You Leave the Great Lawn...

Once mid-January came around, Hawks were bustling back to classes, anticipating (or not) for another semester. Many students may have been groaning at how quickly winter break passed as they were already spending hundreds of dollars on more textbooks. But for approximately 1,000 seniors, they have been feeling like the opposite end of the spectrum.

For those graduating, including several Outlook editors, these next few months as Monmouth Hawks will be our last. And if you’re not, well, you still need to take advantage of what the University and its surrounding community has to offer. Not to get all sentimental about it, but seniors, you can be miserable and fearful of the dark and frightening ‘real world’ out there, or you can stand tall, stand proud and most importantly, stand Blue and White.

Here are some tips to abide by to make your final undergraduate semester at the University your greatest and most memorable yet.

Soar, Hawks. Not literally, but get on a plane and do some traveling! If you had the opportunity to study abroad in Italy, Spain, England or Australia, that’s great news. If you’re a senior and weren’t able to fulfill such a wish, you can still do your own traveling in the tri-state area, or even West Long Branch itself with the friends we’ll be surrounded with until May. Take as many random trips as possible, whether it’s to Atlantic City, New York or anywhere in between. It might be the last chance to do something like that; once you get a ‘real job’ you may not have the option to take vacation time for quite a while. Don’t forget about your own backyard here at the University. Never been to Pier Village to eat at It’s Greek to Me or the Turning Point? Try them both, you won’t regret it.

Read more ...

Students Stop and Yield to New Commuter Lot

Here at the University, commuter parking has always been a controversial issue. Commuters complain about the number of parking spaces and the administration tries to figure out ways to make the parking situation a little better. Over the summer, the main commuter lot was renovated and a new traffic pattern was installed.

The parking lot now includes parking spaces in the opposite direction, sidewalks, and better lighting. There are many crossings located throughout the lot that allows students to walk through without having to worry about a car not seeing them when they are walking. To an abundance of students and administrators this sounds safer and more efficient. Its design was to help alleviate the main concerns and complaints that commuters – now known as “non-residents”- frequently have.

The University and construction workers spent countless hours from the end of May through late August, trying to get the parking lot ready for the fall semester. They braved the high heat of the summer, the strong winds of Hurricane Irene, and even an earthquake, just to make sure the parking lot was done in time. Sure enough, the parking lot was completed for the fall semester.

For the most part, the overall feelings of commuters are split right down the middle. Some like the change, while many are not happy with it all.

Those who like it are happy that there are no more speed bumps and that there is more than one road leading towards the exit. Several even like the idea that the road next to the MAC is open and you can now access Lot 25 (the student parking lot near Plangere) from the main parking lot.

Read more ...

Honor, Remember and Carry On

As we return to the Monmouth campus after a short and humid summer, there are other things on our minds besides setting up our dorm rooms and preparing for classes.

This past Sunday, our country mourned the horrific tragedy, September 11, for the 10th time.

It’s hard to imagine that an entire decade has passed since many of us students watched the burning of the two towers on television during our junior high and elementary classes. September 11 is one of those days when, no matter how much time has passed, you know exactly where you were, what you were doing, and the first thoughts that popped into your head.

If you read the front page news story discussing the national disaster, it’s plain and simple: the thousands of lives that were lost are anything but forgotten. Faculty, staff and students commented on their whereabouts that fateful day, their opinions on how the country has changed since 9/11, and more. The footprints are still there from the treacherous state the attacks left America in. Our guards have gone up, and over the course of 10 years they have only gotten thicker instead of easing down.

The University did a wise thing by creating a 9/11 Remembrance Event, that was held this past Sunday on the Residential Quad. A candlelight ceremony, a moment of silence and a toast to a future of recovery and optimism is appropriate for paying our respects.

Read more ...

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication 
and Instructional Technology (CCIT) Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey 07764

Phone:(732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu