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Last updateThu, 14 Mar 2019 12pm

Lifestyles

Why Would Anyone Write Letters?

default article imageNowadays, there is a lack of passion for writing. Information and  communication documented from the past was tracked through letters, but the growth of technology has vastly changed this.

For the current generation, sending a message through an app, making a phone call, or video chatting are now considered the easiest forms of communicating.

Therefore, the idea of sitting down and writing a deliberate letter seems laughable.

In fact, our generation relates writing “letters” in reference to assignments, heavy work, dreaded formalities and academic responsibilities. All in all, these are validated since we do have other methods of self-expression.

But letters, too, give a certain type of validation we’ve yet to acknowledge; a different scope to self expression, communication, and even changes. The way we view things if only we dedicate time to think, what is worth writing.

Writing a letter does more for one’s state of mind than what is imaginable.  Envision the overcoming of all your  thoughts and sentiments one wishes to communicate and yet there is a  certain amount of given space.

Contrary to popular belief, it is important to write down how one feels. When writing a text, or video chatting, there is little to think about but the mundane, socially acceptable conversation at hand.

When given the chance to write a letter, it offers more than a nonchalant conversation. Writing a letter to someone can not only give the writer clarity, but it can provide validation of their emotions.

Nowadays, writing a letter is connected to a romantic relationship, but it can go beyond that if the friendship ties matter strongly.

Write a letter to your best friend and it can bring a sense of gratefulness. It is a great way to strengthen the relationship.

Letters can be written to anyone, even if it is to your future self.

When asked if she’s ever written a letter, Sheyla Calderon, a freshman criminal justice student, said, “ I only write them for class, or I’d consider my emails letters.” After asking her if she would ever write for personal purposes, she said, “Maybe. I think I would if my friend was going away... [it] shouldn’t be that way, though. Maybe I’ll give it a shot this  weekend and write a few letters to people I care about.”

Addys Diaz, a freshman health studies student, responded to the question of whether she write letters or not. “I have, but for class. I’m not big on writing in general unless for an assignment. I  suppose I could start doing so as a form of journaling and practice; I’ve been trying to better  myself in a way I can be consistent at for this year.”

Diaz also said that it is not just a way of communication, but of self expression, another conduit to self betterment and for personal growth as well. Professor Matt O’Brien, instructor of history, summarized the importance of  writing. She said, “Yes, I still write letters. Whether you have a significant other or not, you  should write.”

Writing letters is a simple hobby that can benefit one in many different  ways.

Not just to strengthen the bonds with our loved ones, but to create better writers and explore our own emotions.

Another great time to write letters is if you are in a long-distance relationship.

Putting your emotions and thoughts onto paper and mailing them to someone you love is great, but the surprise and happiness they will feel when they see it in their mailbox is one that is unmatched.

A letter is way more personal than a text message, so take the time to write a letter, you won’t regret it.

Another reason why writing a letter can be fun is that you can customize it with your favorite color pens or paper, you can add personalized doodles, and maybe even spray your perfume or cologne on it for that really personal feeling.

Hopefully after reading this you can realize why we should bring back the idea of writing letters. Not only can it be a new hobby but it can be a way to release emotions, or a way to make your loved ones feel special.

Give it a go and see its benefits enhance your life too.

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu