Fri11152019

Last updateWed, 13 Nov 2019 12pm

Editorial

Volume 92 (Fall 2019 - Spring 2020)

How Faculty Shape Our Future

default article imageThroughout their time here at Monmouth, students develop different academic and personal aspirations: some wish to pursue graduate programs, while others are seeking to enter the workforce upon graduation.

Whichever path they may choose, the University faculty provide resource and guidance to get students on track to achieving these goals. 

This week, The Outlook staff shared their experiences with faculty and other aspects of the University that have helped plan for their lives after Monmouth. Collectively, our editors had high praise for their faculty members’ interest in their future. 

One editor said, “I have had several professors not only inquire about my future but have written letters of recommendation for me going into the career field.”

“I do believe the professors at Monmouth not only want their students to succeed, but aspire to communicating with them after graduation,” the editor continued. 

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Outlook Mea Culpa

default article imageAs a school newspaper, we constantly look at many aspects of the University under a microscope.  Every week we search campus for stories big and small that we think are important to our readers and our community. But what kind of organization would we be if we did not put ourselves under that microscope? That is why, we would like to publish the fact that The Outlook missed a major story.

The Outlook deeply regrets dropping the ball by not covering, not based on any malice on our part, but solely because we missed it, the Installation of President Patrick Leahy. An event that should have been front page above the fold, appeared nowhere in our paper. That is our mistake and we own it.

In truth, readers may not realize how difficult it is to produce this paper week in and week out. Our staff is composed of full-time students, virtually none of whom receive academic credit for their work, no one is paid, everyone has classes, some may have outside jobs, or obligations, several are athletes, and yet we all still gather in the newsroom every Monday to publish the paper.  

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A Thank You to our Contributors

default article imageThroughout the years, members of the Monmouth University administration have been a key source of information for The Outlook.

We would like to personally thank President Patrick Leahy, Ed.D., Patti Swannack, Vice President for Administrative Services, Mary Anne Nagy, Vice President for Student Life and Leadership Engagement, Marilyn McNeil, Vice President and Director of Athletics, and other key personnel for this consistent aid that they provide to the newspaper.

They typically make time, in what must be very busy schedules, to answer questions and to sit down with Outlook reporters. We would also like to thank the numerous faculty and staff members that answer our inquiries throughout the year. 

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Reporting Incidents of Bias

default article imageActs of discrimination and harassment can be reported to the police and Monmouth University officials, and so can situations of bias.

According to the University policy, an incidence of bias is any suspected or confirmed offense or unlawful act that occurs to a person or private property on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, or ethnicity.

The editorial staff of The Outlook discussed what they would do in situations of bias, and the fact that such incidences can be reported on campus.

The editors were asked whether or not they would intervene if they witnessed a situation of bias. 

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On Democracy at Monmouth

default article imageIn 1963, Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram published a series of experiments that measured obedience to authority figures. The studies found that a very high proportion of subjects would fully obey the instructions given to them. In light of recent information given to The Outlook, the Editorial staff questions how some at the University may be leveraging authority over students, and thereby abusing their power.

According to numerous sources, editors have been informed that student-ambassadors have been directed to not include specific issues of the paper in hand-out packets to potential students at Mondays at Monmouth. These issues included: the mice in Elmwood (Feb. 13, 2019), blackface photos in old Monmouth yearbooks (Mar. 14, 2019), and the series of interviews with the former University president and provost about administrative expansion and tuition increases (April 10, 2019).

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The Strategic Plan: A New Deal

default article imageWith a new president comes a new direction for the University. President Leahy has begun the process of drafting a new strategic plan that will be finalized next July 2020.

Considering this change in leadership, the editorial staff discussed what a strategic plan means to them and what they would like to see in it.

Most of the staff was not sure of the true meaning of a strategic plan. However, it was best explained by one editor who said it is a plan that sets goals which are, “Focused on investing in the university through strengthening our academics and our faculty.”

The editors had a range of issues that they would like President Leahy to address in his plan such as new academic programs, student involvement, extracurricular activities, campus housing, the environment, and tuition.

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The Strategic Plan: A New Deal

default article imageWith a new president comes a new direction for the University. President Leahy has begun the process of drafting a new strategic plan that will be finalized next July 2020.

Considering this change in leadership, the editorial staff discussed what a strategic plan means to them and what they would like to see in it.

Most of the staff was not sure of the true meaning of a strategic plan. However, it was best explained by one editor who said it is a plan that sets goals which are, “Focused on investing in the university through strengthening our academics and our faculty.”

The editors had a range of issues that they would like President Leahy to address in his plan such as new academic programs, student involvement, extracurricular activities, campus housing, the environment, and tuition.

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Campus Improvements

default article imageCampus is quiet. There are no construction trucks or workers. There is no grass seed representing a new lawn or area around a building. What is the next big thing that the University plans on building or improving?

The editors of The Outlook discuss their thoughts on a university’s seemingly never-ending construction and what they would like to see improved around campus.

“I think the next big project for the University is tearing down old dorm rooms like Elmwood and Pinewood. The environments are so dated compared to the other options,” one editor said. “If the University wants better freshman/student retention, they need to update those living spaces.”

“I would love to see a paved path across the great lawn for great lawn residents. The classes are directly across the lawn. However, residents aren’t able to cross when the ground is wet or there are geese (because they leave a lot behind),” said another staffer.

One editor mentioned that they would like to see a better walking path to access the Monmouth University Police Station and Woods Theater on the other side of Norwood Ave. Students must cross the intersection of Cedar and Norwood, a heavily trafficked area. “This would also better the traffic flow since the cross walk stops all the lights in order for students to cross,” said the editor.

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Editors Discuss Deregistration

default article imageAs the costs of higher education continue to rise, students and their families often find themselves in a bind: how to afford to pay the often hefty tuition bill. At Monmouth University, the policy is that students have two weeks prior to the beginning of the semester to pay their bill or else they will be deregistered completely from their classes. This year, that deadline was Aug. 20, and nearly 300 of our students were affected by this policy, losing their spots in classes they scheduled for the fall semester.

While many of the editors have fortunately not experienced this incident, several said that they have been close to it, and one said they had been deregistered entirely. “I got deregistered once because my student loan hadn’t been disbursed to the school yet,” this editor said. “The school didn’t resolve it and all my classes were dropped and I needed to be re-registered when the loan went through.”

Another editor recalled, “I studied abroad this summer, which I almost was not allowed to do because of the cost, and the bill was due only a few days after I got back home; my mom did not have the funds to pay my tuition yet due to the [previous] summer tuition and expenses...I was really close to having this issue (of being deregistered from fall semester classes).”

According to the Office of Financial Aid, it is estimated that 95 percent of students receive some form of financial assistance to attend Monmouth. The editors believe that this percentage is a testament to the cost of tuition, which would require so many students to be in need of assistance and cover the costs. It was noted by one editor that this statistic encompasses several factors, including merit-based scholarships. “I believe many, if not all, students receive some form of academic scholarship from Monmouth, because they are fortunate to have enough funds to disperse,” the editor said. “I do believe that many others, including myself, receive financial assistance because of the high cost of the University.”

One editor said, “I am a part of that 95 percent (receiving financial assistance) and I still can barely come up with the money to pay my tuition bill each semester. The cost of tuition at Monmouth, and really any college, is ridiculously high and most college students struggle to pay their tuition.”

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Welcome Back, Hawks!

default article imageOld and new, The Outlook wants to welcome you back to Monmouth. We are excited to kick off another great year. 

Freshmen, there is so much ahead of you. Monmouth offers hundreds of opportunities to experience new things, meet new people, and find out what you love in life. Do not worry if you have not yet chosen a major or a career path. Experiment with your classes.

Have a class or a professor that you really love? Take more of them. You might not find out what you want to do right away, but you will slowly figure out what you do not want to do. Not everyone is meant to sit in a cubicle in front of a computer all day long. 

Upperclassmen, you are on your way to finding your path in life. You might have some things figured out. You might have nothing figured out. That is okay. Either way, you are making progress. Keep going.

Seniors, we are almost there. It is almost time for us to go out into the real world. Wow. If you are still not sure where the future will take you, that is alright. I am not quite sure yet either. This might be our final year and time is going fast, but there is still plenty for us to do and experience.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu