Fri09202019

Last updateWed, 18 Sep 2019 12pm

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Registration Riots: Scheduling Required Classes

registrationIt’s about that time of the year again: the stressful and frustrating experience of registering for classes for the upcoming year. With the time slots allotted and the information of classes available for each semester, scheduling wreaks havoc for many students. Be sure to provide yourself with the correct amount of time to research, conform and configure the next year’s academic schedule.

There is limited class availability for certain sections and the later your scheduled registration is, the lesser your chances are of getting into specific sections. Creating a workable college course schedule is extremely important. A smart college course schedule allows a student not only to succeed, but also to engage in extracurricular activities.

Kelly Dalton, a junior student athlete, said that it is frustrating when she has a schedule planned that fits around games and practices but the class sections are full by the time she is able to register for them. Classes at the University are relatively small and are therefore limited in availability.

She added, “As a soon to be senior, I have certain courses that must be fulfilled in order to graduate on time. That could create problems for me if I cannot register for my vital courses.”

The first step before you can register for classes is to meet with your academic advisor to get unblocked. Reece Johnston,  junior, said, “I feel like the process of getting unlocked by your advisor is an unnecessary step. Meeting with an advisor is a good idea for younger students, but as I have progressed in my academic career, I have found it is pointless and feel as though there should be no lock and unlock step.”

Worksheet One and Worksheet Two on Webadvisor add excess time to the process of registering. The confusion of adding classes to Worksheet One and then proceeding to do the same process to Worksheet Two is just a repetitive step. Johnston also added that lessening the two steps to one could reduce the confusion and help students in the long run. 

As a requirement in certain fields, students are obligated to work at an internship, observe or student teach while at the University. The obstacle of generating a schedule that has the correct classes at convenient times does not always fit the way students need it to. This can cause a stressful experience while creating the schedule.

While away at school, students find that they have to be more independent. Some have to rely on providing themselves with their own way of spending means. Jobs need employees that will be available on a consistent basis. The lack of available courses and openings gives these working students a difficult time with adjusting to fit the necessary classes.

Often, students find that if someone needs to add an elective to their schedule they sign up for certain classes that others may need in order to graduate. This leads to classes filling up with less availability for others who truly need it.

Professor Nick Mescarmazza, physical education professor, said that certain students have requested to take his courses, however, the classes were already full. Although he may want to waive them into his course, the size of the classroom creates a problem when the number of students becomes so high.

Many 300 and 400 level courses only provide one to three sections per semester. With the amount of students fighting for spots in these sections it is difficult to find enough openings. The anxiety of registering for classes is especially high for rising seniors who need specific courses in order to graduate.

One suggestion is this: prior to your date of registration, check the fall and spring availabilities for the specific classes required. Trying to create the perfect schedule may have its complications, so it is important to have back up options.

Creating a backup schedule will provide a second option if your first choice classes do not work in your favor. Make a list of the classes you want and categorize by priority. The more options and the more prepared you are, the smoother registration will go.

IMAGE TAKEN from webadvisor.monmouth.edu

Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu