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Last updateMon, 11 Dec 2017 12pm

Lifestyles

Parents Know Best

lifestyles parents adivce 2 page 9Growing up we often shrugged off our parents’ advice because “I know, Mom,” was a better excuse but as we navigate through life as adults, we realize that their advice was actually the greatest advice we could ever receive. There’s the simple advice like “don’t put plastic or aluminum foil in the microwave,” but then they give us life advice specifically tailored to us about our relationships, our fears, and our successes.

What’s so unique about a parent’s advice is that, as much as we don’t want to admit it, they know us best. Dr. Susan Starke, an associate professor of English, says “Parents’ advice is valuable and always worth considering because it’s well meant and our parents tend to know us better than anyone else.”

Our parents love us and want to see us happy and successful; therefore, any advice they pass on to us will only have the intentions of positive outcomes. A junior English and education student, Annie Doyle shares some advice that her parents gave her: “My Mom once told me to do whatever makes me happy. Whether it be sleeping in, going on a trip, skipping class—do whatever makes me happy all the time.” She continues, “She told me to keep my own happiness as the main priority in any decision I make in life.”

It is safe to say that the crux of any advice our parents give us is our happiness. Doyle’s Mom provides us with extremely important advice. As college students, there are so many pressures and negative forces working against us, or so it may seem, but there is no reason not to make our happiness a main priority. If that means skipping class one day, as Doyle’s Mom suggests, then we should just go for it! One skip isn’t going to ruin our futures.

Sometimes we forget that not everything we do now will be a huge deal in the future; we get caught up in all of the tasks and work we have to do now that we don’t realize that this essay we have to write right now won’t really matter in the future.

lifestyles parents advice page 9That brings me to a piece of advice my parents gave me, which is: “You don’t have to do everything you can. Do as much as you can handle—don’t overdo it.” A lot of us are overachievers and tend to take on much more than we can handle. With all of the incredible programs and organizations that MU has to offer, it is difficult to turn down a new and enticing opportunity. But, sometimes we have to say “no” in order to keep sane. Our college years are filled with new experiences and we want to try everything, but we need to remember to do so in moderation.

Another piece of advice that we can take into consideration comes from the Dad of Coral Cooper, a junior English student: “Patience, tolerance, and kindness.” These three simple words are a wonderful piece of advice on how to live our everyday lives. We must always have patience with not only others, but with ourselves. People aren’t perfect, and neither are we. We have to tolerate all different viewpoints—especially on a campus with such a diverse group of minds. And we have to be kind to others and ourselves. Kindness goes a long way; going out of your way to do one small kind act can make someone’s day!

While our parent’s truly can give us the greatest tailored advice, sometimes we have to discover things on our own too. Dr. Starke also added to her above comment: “I do think there comes a time when a young adult knows him/herself and his/her situation better than his/her parents.” All we can do is take our parents’ advice, or any advice for that matter, into consideration. Sometimes, they may not understand something that is going on in our lives, but they’re only human—they can’t be perfect. But, we know they have our best interest at heart.

Thanks, Moms and Dads for your love and care. While we may be stubborn at times, we know you just want us to succeed and we can do so with your advice in the backs of our minds.

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Monmouth University
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