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Last updateFri, 17 Nov 2017 9pm

News

Volume 87 (Fall 2015 - Spring 2016)

Tinder Adds an STD Clinic Locator to the Application

TinderPopular dating app Tinder has now agreed to provide information about local sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing clinic locations, halting a long battle with a California advocacy group.

The decision marks an end to Tinder’s battle with Los Angeles, CA based AIDS Health Foundation. In the fall of 2015, the group launched an ad campaign accusing the dating app of contributing to the spread of STDs.

Tinder has always marketed itself as a dating app, but critics argue that the app is only used for casual hook ups. Therefore, its reputation as a “hook up” app has contributed to the idea that the app is responsible for the spread of STDs.

“Hook up” is a colloquial term commonly used to refer to the act of making out and/or having sexual intercourse.

It has been said that the current generation is the “hook up” generation, as many people desire simply to have sex with others and not start a meaningful relationship. With Tinder, individuals can create a profile with a short biography explaining their interests and personality. Then, the users can upload a series of photos. Upon reading the profile and viewing the photos, the other users, many of whom are a reasonable distance away, can either swipe right, indicating that this person is attractive, or swipe left, suggesting that there is no interest in this person.

Additionally, users can super swipe, meaning that they swipe upward and have a particularly strong attraction.

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Community Colleges May be Free in the Near Future

Free CollegeLess than three months ago renovations began  to be made to Pollak Theatre to update the space in order for it to work more efficiently as a theatre. These renovations were completed on Jan. 22

Molly Huber, a sophomore theatre arts student likes the improvements. “The renovations have really taken Pollak to the next level. The theatre is absolutely beautiful and has been updated to accommodate for a much more diverse set of acts,” she said.

“The remodel has given life to the theatre and it will enable students, faculty and staff to enjoy so many more performances. Thus everyone should really care about it. Pollak opens the campus up to a variety of different cultural and artistic opportunities,” she said.

 In its original construction, Pollak was not meant to be a theatre. “Pollak Theatre was built in 1970. It was constructed to be a lecture hall, and it was built to project speaking--it wasn’t a theatre,” said Vaune Peck, the Counselor and Coordinator of Arts Programming and Promotion.

According to Peck the renovation of Pollak Theatre was swift. “The theatre was completely transformed in a month and a half. They got in here on Dec. 6 and they finished on Jan. 22, the day before the snowstorm. It was amazing; I couldn’t believe it. They worked around the clock,” she said.

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Renovations for Pollak Theatre Budgeted at $800,000

Pollak RenovationsLess than three months ago renovations began  to be made to Pollak Theatre to update the space in order for it to work more efficiently as a theatre. These renovations were completed on Jan. 22

Molly Huber, a sophomore theatre arts student likes the improvements. “The renovations have really taken Pollak to the next level. The theatre is absolutely beautiful and has been updated to accommodate for a much more diverse set of acts,” she said.

“The remodel has given life to the theatre and it will enable students, faculty and staff to enjoy so many more performances. Thus everyone should really care about it. Pollak opens the campus up to a variety of different cultural and artistic opportunities,” she said.

 In its original construction, Pollak was not meant to be a theatre. “Pollak Theatre was built in 1970. It was constructed to be a lecture hall, and it was built to project speaking--it wasn’t a theatre,” said Vaune Peck, the Counselor and Coordinator of Arts Programming and Promotion.

According to Peck the renovation of Pollak Theatre was swift. “The theatre was completely transformed in a month and a half. They got in here on Dec. 6 and they finished on Jan. 22, the day before the snowstorm. It was amazing; I couldn’t believe it. They worked around the clock,” she said.

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How Does the University Combat Winter Storms?

On Friday, Feb. 26 Rock N‘ Raise annual charity event will take over the Hawk TV studio in the Jules L. Plangere Center for Communications building. Rock N’ Raise is a competition between bands who raise money and perform in hopes to win a grand prize and of course, bragging rights. This event is co-sponsored by WMCX and Hawk TV. WMCX and Hawk TV will both stream and broadcast Rock N’ Raise live.

The idea of Rock N’ Raise first came about in 2013 after Hurricane Sandy devastated the Jersey Shore. Both WMCX and Hawk TV wanted to put on an event to raise money to help those affected by Sandy, so the two organizations joined forces. Rock N’ Raise since then has become an annual live production.

While WMCX and Hawk TV co-sponsor the event, the two organizations have very different responsibilities when planning Rock N’ Raise. “Hawk TV is required to make sure we have a full crew for the event and insure the overall flow of production. Specifically as executive producer I have to make sure all the tech equipment is working and that the staff knows their role,” said Joseph M. Ruggiero, a senior communication student and executive producer of Hawk TV.

As Hawk TV focuses on the live production aspect of the event WMCX focuses on the musical aspects. “As the music producer of this year’s Rock N’ Raise the majority of my planning included getting a hold of a whole bunch of bands and artist to take part in the event,” says Larissa Trovamala, a senior communication student and an active member of both Hawk TV and WMCX. Some of the bands that Trovamala secured to perform at Rock N’ Raise are The Mercury Brothers from Red Bank and Eastbourne from Asbury Park. “Larissa [Trovamala] has done an amazing job finding four local successful bands to perform, explains Hawk TV executive producer, Ruggiero. 

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University Joins Medical Mission in Haiti

Medical Assistance Haiti (Front Page)Over winter break, 14 people, including University students and faculty, traveled to Haiti with 25 nurses and nursing students from other universities to run medical clinics throughout the country, helping about 1500 patients from Jan. 4-Jan. 10.

“We set up the clinics in the countryside and more urban areas (where the Haitian people were relocated after heir earthquake which happened six years ago). We also visited a hospital and went to an orphanage,” said Dr. Laura Jannone, Associate Professor of Nursing.

Janone went with her husband Dr. Joel Jannone a Primary Care Physician, their daughter Gina Jannone, a graduate student who helped run the pharmacy, pediatrician, Dr. Steve Miller, Carol Miller and their daughter Amanda Miller, a nurse, along with eight sophomore pre-licensure nursing students.

The students and faculty handed out hygiene kits filled with soap, washcloths, toothbrushes, toothpaste, dental floss, and hand sanitizer, to the patients they encountered. The students who attended used the skills they learned in their Individual Health Assessment course they took during the fall semester with Dr. Patricia Sciscione, specialist professor of nursing, at makeshift clinics.

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MU Celebrates World Hijab Day

World Hijab Day 2016World Hijab day at the University was located outside of the dining area of the RSSC, however, Zareen Shueib, treasurer of the MSA, believes the event was successful in reaching its goals. “It was more isolated than other years because of the renovations to the dining area, so we were located in the hallway, but it was still a great event. As a Muslim it showed me that Monmouth students are willing and open to new experiences and knowledge. They don’t let the media influence their choices and opportunities of learning new things,” she said.

“I loved how many students were interested in learning how to wear one [a hijab]. I think it was a wonderful, and humbling experience helping students who were honestly interested in learning how to wear one,” said Ayubi.

Tatiana Castro, a senior marine and environmental biology and policy student, enthusiastically described her experience. “When I first put on the hijab I simply felt beautiful. I don’t know how else to describe it, I just felt so humbled to have the opportunity to learn about the Muslim religion and to be able to put a hijab on without possibly offending anyone. I always wanted to see what it felt like, and having people around you showing you how to put it on, and encouraging you to flaunt it was such a wonderful experience. I loved every minute of it,” she said.

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University Reacts to Zika Virus Outbreak

Zika Virus OutbreakAs explained by the Pan American Health Organization, the Zika virus is an infection that is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito of the Aedes genus. This virus usually causes mild fever, exanthema (skin rash), conjunctivitis, and muscle pain.

Although the first isolated case was in the Zika forest of Uganda in 1947 with minor outbreaks in the Asian regions, the Zika virus soon became a widespread epidemic that affected individuals both asymptomatically and symptomatically. Nearly one in five people infected show symptoms that were very similar to those of the dengue or chikungunya.

However, studies show that 80 percent of infected individuals do not feel ill or show any symptoms. According to an article in The New York Times, women who live in or have visited infected areas during the beginning of their pregnancy may have experienced birth defects with their newborn such as microcephaly.

Microcephaly is a medical condition where the fetus’s head is abnormally smaller than it should be and is often associated with incomplete brain development. If an infected mosquito bites a woman during her pregnancy, the infection could make its way into the amniotic fluid that aids in the nourishment and well-being of the fetus which could ultimately make the fetus more susceptible to birth defects.

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Traditional College Admissions Process May See Changes Soon

College Admissions Change

Harvard University plans on revolutionizing the college admissions process. For decades, colleges have stressed the importanc

e of stellar grades, astronomical SAT scores, and abundant extracurricular activities. However, for many students across the country, the opportunities for a stacked resume simply are not present.

Recently, the Harvard Graduate School of Education presented its case for an admissions “revolution.” Rather than placing heavy emphasis on great test scores and extracurricular activities, the  Harvard report suggested that the admissions process should reward students who aid their families and strive to be good individuals.

Statistics on a resume do not tell the whole story of a student; often, those with picture-perfect grades and activities lack the interpersonal abilities to contribute to society. Therefore, the new process will take into consideration personal attributes and rely less on solely the numbers.

The report implies that prospective students will be able to write essays describing their experiences helping their families. Not every student has the access to community service and extracurricular activities; therefore, this new process would allow students to display their redeemable qualities in the form of a narrative. Whether it is baby-sitting or mowing the lawn, these activities would be valued just as highly as an afterschool club or internship.

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No Snow Days for Dining Hall Staff

Upon closure of the University due to inclement weather, dining hall employees must still come to work to make sure residential students are fed.

On snow days, almost all buildings are closed. The Rebecca Stafford Student Center will often be closed, or it may have a delayed opening. Other locations, such as the café in the library and the convenience store, are also shut down.

All non-essential offices are closed; many classes are cancelled so that students can stay inside. However, all students still need to eat, and since many on-campus dormitories do not have kitchens, the dining hall must stay open, even during snow storms.

While most University employees are able to stay home during dangerous weather, those who work in the dining hall still have to go to work, and accommodations must be made to make sure that they are able to arrive safely.

“Sometimes, we have employees sleep over,” said Steven Black, the resident dining director. “They can sleep over in the club rooms. I personally, and my general manager Chris Ryerson, sometimes pick them up and drive them home, but we would rather them stay here if the storm is really bad, when it’s over a foot or more.”

However, these employee sleepovers are done only in the case of emergency, such as during winter storm Jonas. The previous snow on Friday, Feb. 5, would not have qualified as such an emergency situation. According to Black, employees are compensated at an hourly rate. Typically, it is only employees who would be working night shifts that stay overnight.

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MU Valet Drives Mixed Reactions

Valet ParkingMonmouth University is one of the few universities that, for the last 20 years, has given commuters and employees the option to valet park their vehicles for free when parking has been unavailable. While the convenience of dropping your keys off before running to class seems ideal, many students find that it has become a hassle.

The parking issue at Monmouth University is no secret. Whether it is construction, snow covered parking spots, or the commotion of the commuter parking lots when classes let out, students often have a hard time finding a parking spot. Megan Eustice, a senior health studies student, gets to campus extra early just to make sure she can get a spot. “Sometimes I arrive 30 minutes early because I know I have to drive around to look for a spot. Giving myself 30 minutes sometimes isn’t even enough. I am still late to class.”

According to Usnews.com, as of 2014, 58 percent of undergraduate students at the University live off-campus. With over 4,500 undergrads, that means over 2,500 students commute to class on a regular basis. If each student drives in their own vehicle, available parking spots quickly run out. So when given the choice to valet park instead of driving around, many students take advantage.

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MU Study Suggests College Athletes More Likely to Misperceive Consent for Sex

Consent For SexA study conducted by Monmouth University’s Jennifer McGovern, assistant professor of political science and sociology, and Patrick Murray, Director of the Polling Institute found that athletes, both male and female, are more likely to misperceive consent for sex compared to non-athlete students.

The study was designed to research sexual assault prevention strategies that would be specifically tailored to student athletes. McGovern and Murray’s research determined that, without taking athleticism into account, male students are more likely to perceive when consent is being given when compared to female students. However, both male and female athletes are more likely to misperceive consent than non-athlete students.

McGovern, has a focus in understanding how sport both reflects and challenges social inequalities, including social class, race, ethnicity, gender, nationality, and sexuality.

“One of the reasons we wanted to do this on student athletes was because obviously this topic is big in the news in general, and it’s something that’s affecting many campuses, but in particular, it has affected student athletes, or at least there’s a thought that it’s male student athletes, in a sense, being troublemakers and perpetrators,” said McGovern.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu