Thu06202019

Last updateMon, 29 Apr 2019 1pm

Editorial

That Awkward Moment When... Your Boyfriend Leaves You to be Eaten by Jaws

default article imageMy hands glide through the water as I pretend to not clumsily paddle deeper into the ocean.

The foam surfboard is underneath me, the sun beaming high above me, and my boyfriend’s glistening in sweat and salt water a couple feet beside me.

My bikini has never looked so good against my smooth tan skin.

I sit up straddling my board and look back towards shore.

It’s the most perfect day a girl could ask for.

I gaze at my boyfriend as he paddles to catch a wave; his arms outstretched showcasing his hardworking muscles.

His wet hair whips back as he jumps up on the board and rides effortlessly to shore.

I’m immediately thrown into a daydream where I’m a helpless city girl visiting the beach who gets swept away. My boyfriend must swim after me, his arms paddling viciously against the cruel ocean.

Wave after wave crashes over me as time dwindles on his life saving mission.

He finally reaches me, his hands strongly taking hold of my weak body. “I’ve got you,” he whispers in my ear as he guides me back to land.

Reaching the sand, he carries me to safety, my body too weak from its battle with the ocean.

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Before You Leave the Great Lawn...

Once mid-January came around, Hawks were bustling back to classes, anticipating (or not) for another semester. Many students may have been groaning at how quickly winter break passed as they were already spending hundreds of dollars on more textbooks. But for approximately 1,000 seniors, they have been feeling like the opposite end of the spectrum.

For those graduating, including several Outlook editors, these next few months as Monmouth Hawks will be our last. And if you’re not, well, you still need to take advantage of what the University and its surrounding community has to offer. Not to get all sentimental about it, but seniors, you can be miserable and fearful of the dark and frightening ‘real world’ out there, or you can stand tall, stand proud and most importantly, stand Blue and White.

Here are some tips to abide by to make your final undergraduate semester at the University your greatest and most memorable yet.

Soar, Hawks. Not literally, but get on a plane and do some traveling! If you had the opportunity to study abroad in Italy, Spain, England or Australia, that’s great news. If you’re a senior and weren’t able to fulfill such a wish, you can still do your own traveling in the tri-state area, or even West Long Branch itself with the friends we’ll be surrounded with until May. Take as many random trips as possible, whether it’s to Atlantic City, New York or anywhere in between. It might be the last chance to do something like that; once you get a ‘real job’ you may not have the option to take vacation time for quite a while. Don’t forget about your own backyard here at the University. Never been to Pier Village to eat at It’s Greek to Me or the Turning Point? Try them both, you won’t regret it.

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Occupying Off-Campus Housing During Breaks

College life is nothing without dormitories and off-campus housing where students learn a great deal about independence. However, when coming close to the end of the semester, such freedom can feel like it is ending. While it stands to reason that some students are excited to go back home, other may have different reasons to stay and want to remain in their housing through the break until the following semester begins.

For the most part, this situation is geared more toward those living in off-campus housing than dormitories. Although there are some dormitories that have kitchens, those who live in off-campus housing, students are given more amenities, in addition to having a form of transportation. With dorms, it means more work for the University police to make sure everything is safe and sound at a time that’s generally void of students. If you have the accommodations to allow living off-campus and choosing to remain there, why should students have to depart?

For some students, this means taking a leave of absence from any employment they might have while on campus. If they are working at a store in the mall or a local business to earn money for classes, book, etc., then it could put a dent on their plans. In other words, this would mean leaving one job and searching for another for only a few weeks. Staying in the area would allow students to keep working and then use that money for tuition, etc.

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Do You “Like” Social Media?

Over the past few years, social media has quickly grown bigger and bigger. Everywhere we look there is now some reference to social media. CNN has viewers tweet their thoughts in on a news story, bands and businesses have Facebook pages that you can “like” to gain more access to information about that topic, employers search for possible new employees on LinkedIn, and of course, we as individual people have our own accounts in social media. As social media continues to grow, many feel that it is important to be literate in these areas, and know both how to use them and how to stay out of trouble while doing so. There are many positives to what social media has brought to the world, but at the same time one can’t help but look at the negatives as well.

First of all, in present day it seems as though having an understanding of how to use social media is basically a necessity. Today, words like “tweet” and “friend” have become verbs and mostly everyone seems to be involved in social media in some way, whether it’s having a Facebook, Twitter, or a LinkedIn account. It’s not just an idea that exists with teenagers anymore. Now, parents, grandparents, commercial brands, and other businesses have also got involved in the trend that is social media. Because businesses are involved, knowing how to use social media is now a strength to possible employees and it looks great on a resume. Employers also like to see that you are keeping up with the digital age and are making a presence for yourself online.

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To Build or Not to Build? That is the Question

default article imageSometimes, it becomes hard to enjoy the quaint, homey beauty of the campus of our University when all we can hear are hammers through the walls of our classrooms. Some of us also have to spend our classtimes in trailers, and we wake up to the sound of drills.

Many University students can’t even remember a time when Monmouth was not working on some sort of construction. The most recent construction projects include the Edison Science Building addition, Multipurpose Activity Center, the tennis courts, and the detention basin. Right behind these projects were the Jules Plangere Building, McAllan Hall, and the renovation of Redwood and Oakwood Halls. Since 1994, $175 million of construction have been done.

It brings forth the question of whether or not the inconveniences of construction to the students are worth the modernized buildings that are being built. For some students, this construction can seriously disrupt their own learning experience that they, in all fairness, paid tuition for. How can we be expected to do science experiments in a trailer, when we signed up for a science classroom in the Edison Science Building? How can we listen to a lecture when we can barely hear what our professor is saying through the sounds of a drill?

Many of the current students will not get a chance to even enjoy the renovations that they sit through classes in trailers in order to receive, as many of our recent alumni have not even gotten the opportunity to enjoy our new residence halls and academic buildings. This especially makes all of the disruptions and irritations not worth it to current students who had to endure it.

Some students, although understanding of the University’s need to grow and improve, do not see the point of constant construction projects. One possibility is to halt construction every few years to just give students a little break from the constant change and awkward middle ground of going to a school that really isn’t quite finished yet. This way, we could really have a chance to enjoy our campus and just be students who don’t have to worry about avoiding yet another construction detour.

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A Major and Minor Deal With New Courses

default article imageImagine opening your textbook to understand what Homeland Security is about and how to apply its concepts or using motion graphics to creating something out of thin air. While these two ideas might seem different, they are actually majors and minors available for students. The School of Humanities and Social Sciences currently offers a graduate certificate in Homeland Security while the Department of Communication has an interactive media minor. Although both of these grasp the ideals of today’s society, it remains that more can be done to promote them and expand upon present fields of study.

However, before we go further, one should understand what exactly constitutes a college major and minor. According to collegeboard.com, “A major is simply a specific subject that students can specialize in.” As for minors, they allow students to gain more insight into other areas while focusing on their main area of study.

First off, these courses are solid ideas for today’s world. Ten or so years ago, homeland security was still an important issue but times have changed. This goes too for the interactive media minor since almost a decade ago, the Internet and technology as a whole was not geared toward creating videos, using motion graphics, creating interactive websites, and more. These two examples are a reflection of how the University realizes that the workforce and career paths are changing and are giving students an opportunity to use this to their advantage.

Overall, areas of study like these and many more make the campus and University distinctive from other institutions. However, the University is not alone is thinking this way. According to mainstreet.com, the University is in line with other education facilities in regards to new majors and minors by reporting, “…as changing technology and social trends create new opportunities in a job-strapped economy, some institutions are beginning to offer programs in everything from social media to homeland security to prepare students for life in the 21st Century.”

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Homecoming: ‘Weather’ it Should Have Been Rescheduled

default article imageEach year at the end of October, the students and alumni come together to celebrate what is one of the most anticipated events of the entire school year, Homecoming. Everyone throws on their Monmouth apparel and comes together to support the football team. The club and Greek organizations show off their floats while the communication organizations come together to report on the day’s events via radio, television and news. The Homecoming court is announced and we find out who was elected king and queen in addition to the other ranks.

Due to the weather this year, one can’t help but feel shorted on the whole Homecoming experience.

Obviously the University cannot control the weather, but does anyone really know who was even elected king and queen? What about all the hard work the club and Greek organizations put into their floats? The communication branches relocated their festivities upstairs into the MAC, but there were no e-mails or notifications sent out letting anyone know. Overall, the day’s events seemed rather unorganized.

The parade was not officially cancelled until about 15 minutes prior to start time. Three floats ended up running and the prize money was split amongst them. But where does that leave the rest of the floats, will they not have an opportunity to show off their hard work? All of this leads to the question of whether or not Homecoming should be rescheduled. Moreover, can Homecoming even be rescheduled?

The opinion here at The Outlook was split almost evenly, with the majority leaning towards the idea that you can’t reschedule an event as large as Homecoming. The students who are not graduating this year were impartial to the idea of rescheduling; they figured there will be other Homecoming celebrations, and nothing could have been done about the weather.

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Start Job Hunting Now

default article imageHow soon should graduating seniors start job searching? Many professors on campus deem it a full-time job in of itself, but The Outlook staff feels that many students aren’t prepared for what awaits them after accepting their diploma.

Students don’t know where to start when it comes to job seeking. Who to talk to and where to look are common concerns among students. It can be overwhelming searching on an employment database site such as monster.com, when many of the job postings seem to require five to seven years of experience.

Thankfully, the University provides countless services on campus to guide students along with their career goals. However, many students are unaware of these services until crunch time creeps up on them towards the end of the semester.

First off, job searching can be much more efficient if students start as soon as possible.

The University’s Center for Student Success (CSS) acts as an integrated advising system that provides all students with career counseling services. These include everything from help with resume and cover letter writing to mock interviews, LinkedIn workshops, and job placement assistance. The advising program within CSS assists students narrow down career goals and matching up with perspective employers.

Assistant Dean for Career Services Will Hill said there are three important things students can do in the job market to increase their odds of success. “First, start your job search early. Rushing your job search at the last minute prior to graduation can lead to poor decisions and lost opportunities. Second, use the power of networking to get the word out that you are in the market and actively looking for a career. Use Linkedin.com, go to job fairs, networking events or anywhere you can connect with potential connections. And third, make sure your resume, cover letter and interviewing skills are top notch. In this market even small mistakes are deal-breakers for employers. The staff in Career Services can help you plan your job search strategy, so include us in your plans.”

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Are You Ever Too Old for Halloween?

default article imageWhen growing up Halloween is like a dream come true. What little boy doesn’t want to dress up as his favorite superhero and what little girl would deny being a princess for a day? Not to mention the candy. It is the one night where a child can eat as much candy as he or she wants without getting yelled at.

As you get older though, you have to wonder, when am I too old for Halloween? Here at The Outlook we tried to answer this question.

The editors had mixed feelings on Halloween, but not one said that the holiday should stop being celebrated when reaching a certain age. They simply stated that celebrating this holiday is quite different when you get older.

Most people may think that trick-or-treating should come to an end after you are a teenager, but some of The Outlook editors disagree. They don’t think that there is anything wrong with people in their late 20’s going from door to door shouting “trick or treat!” Let’s be honest, everyone loves free candy.

However, some believe that trick or treating should have an age limit and that college students shouldn’t be going house-to-house collecting candy. For these people, a little on-campus Halloween mischief seemed a bit more appropriate.

Students who are underage have more trouble when trying to find ways to celebrate this holiday. Several of us feel that this year, the University tried its best to give students Halloween activities, but some feel the University could have tried harder.

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The Display of Political Beliefs by Faculty Members

default article imageWhen growing up Halloween is like a dream come true. What little boy doesn’t want to dress up as his favorite superhero and what little girl would deny being a princess for a day? Not to mention the candy. It is the one night where a child can eat as much candy as he or she wants without getting yelled at.

As you get older though, you have to wonder, when am I too old for Halloween? Here at The Outlook we tried to answer this question.

The editors had mixed feelings on Halloween, but not one said that the holiday should stop being celebrated when reaching a certain age. They simply stated that celebrating this holiday is quite different when you get older.

Most people may think that trick-or-treating should come to an end after you are a teenager, but some of The Outlook editors will disagree. They don’t think that there is anything wrong with people in their late 20s going from door to door shouting “trick or treat!” Let’s be honest, everyone loves free candy.

However, some believe that trick or treating should have an age limit, and that college students shouldn’t be going house to house collecting candy. For these people, a little on campus Halloween mischief seemed a bit more appropriate.

Students who are underage have more trouble when trying to find ways to celebrate this holiday. Several of us feel that this year, the University tried its best to give students Halloween activities, but some feel the University could have tried harder.

With university sponsored events like the Haunted Tour of Wilson and pumpkin carving on the Quad, students were given different ways to celebrate Halloween on campus without. Even with these events, some of the editors feel like underage students will be left bored in the dorms with nothing to do on the evening of Halloween.

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Finally a Break...Sort of

For the first time, our University is implementing a “Fall Break.” Obviously, this addition of extra time off during our busy fall semester caused a great deal of excitement among students. However, most of these high expectations fell short when students learned that the time off bears no resemblance to the anxiously awaited “Spring Break,” and, in fact, is only one day off from classes.

From one aspect, we as students are at least being given one extra day off in the semester, which makes it hard to complain about. However, this “Fall Break” has on-campus students asking if it is doing more damage than good.

Since some students don’t have Friday classes, it does not change much other than giving on-campus individuals the inconvenience of moving out of the residence halls for three days. Students who live far away from campus and don’t have a car are being truly affected by this break.

They can put in a request form with the Office of Residential Life to be allowed to stay in the halls over the three day break, but what happens to eating? The Dining Hall is closing on Thursday night, leaving students without a way of getting food for three days.

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu