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Last updateWed, 22 Nov 2017 8am

Features

Is There Room for Love in the Life of a College Student?

coupleIn the life of a college student, much of his or her time is spent studying, relaxing with friends, or working. This may seem to leave little time for a committed relationship, but some couples make it work. 

Others, however, seem to believe they can’t be bothered with something serious, and prefer not to get involved with others romantically. It can even be said that students might be scared to fall in love, due to the potential havoc it could wreak on their social lives. Or even the question of is falling in love even worth the trouble when devastating heartbreak is always a possibility? As always, the only way to get an answer is to ask the students themselves.

“I really don’t think you need a relationship in college,” said Katie Pedernera, a freshman. “You should be more focused on yourself. Relationships can happen; you just shouldn’t go looking for them.” 

People often have trouble seeing what’s really there, meaning the ability to distinguish love from infatuation. It can be a hindrance to spend time on what ultimately won’t yield any lasting results, so it may just be better to not go looking for love at all. 

But as in life, what about when things just happen? We should be prepared for the unexpected, so what should students do if they find themselves truly smitten with someone?

“It all depends on the person, really. Some people are more into commitment than others. Also everyone has different views of the meaning of the word love,” said Jessica Schue, a sophomore business administration student. 

Life and love are hard and difficult to explain. What works for some might not work for others, and overall it is different for everyone. “But in my opinion no matter where you are whether you’re in college, high school, or in your career path if you fall in love you should cherish it,” added Schue.

This rings true for everyone of all ages. Despite our personal views on the subject, people tend to come to the consensus of love being a precious thing. Too many people spend their lives being angry at others, but love is something special. If you’re with the right person, you should pursue that relationship. 

Love is scary. Sometimes, you may not want to go through with it because you can’t imagine not being on your own any longer, but it has to be given a chance, because you might miss someone who would make you truly happy. 

Look around campus, and put aside your own dislike or personal feeling on relationships, and take a look at a couple in public. It’s not that unlikely to see two people truly happy together. It’s completely acceptable to be nervous about starting something when there’s no way to see how it will end, but it’s absolutely worth it to try. 

Alexander Gilvarry, an artist in residence in the English department, said, “There’s sides to both of it, commitment’s hard since students are young. At the same time I think if you can be committed you get a jumpstart in serious relationships.”

Gilvarry added, “I don’t think that it’s just a problem with students, I think it’s a problem with people of all ages, with  commitment. It’s not limited to them.”

As far as being “worth it,” that question is the most difficult of all. Love can make people get hurt in the worst and most vulnerable way: emotionally. As we are beings who fear what we cannot know, it can certainly seem a viable solution for students to avoid love entirely. But as previously stated, there is no way to know for sure. 

Michael Mottola, a sophomore English student, said, “There is no definitive answer. If love were safe and not scary, it would cease being love, and then be nothing more than lust. Love is scary, beautiful, and taxing. Students can’t control if they fall in love during college, they might, or they might not.” 

As stated, love is mysterious, and students tend to know that. Whether by ignoring it, embracing it, or simply being content to understand it, love is a powerful thing that will find its way to everyone one way or the other. And the best part is: you have no idea how wonderful it could end up being.

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