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Last updateWed, 19 Sep 2018 1pm

Editorial

Technology in the Classroom

The use of electronics in classrooms seems to be an ever-evolving topic – whether laptops are helpful or distracting; whether students take notes better if they write or type them. If a student is distracted on their computer, is it their choice as to whether they want to waste class time, or does it distract other students?

Most professors seem to have banned phones easily enough, with almost all syllabi banning them from class use, but sometimes computers, laptops, and tablets are a more complicated matter, since they can be used both positively and negatively. Further difficulties arise when every professor seems to have their own policy on the matter.

“Most of my professors this semester have banned technology,” said one editor. “Four of them are communication professors, and I think that that’s a department that is a lot stricter with electronics lately.”

Lorna Schmidt, a professor in the communication department and director of advising at the University, offered up several possible reasons as to why electronic devices may be banned. “Most of the classes are interactive, really face-to-face interactive,” she explained. “We don’t want people distracted by technology. Facebook is always there, there’s the little notifications popping up – it can be distracting.”

Schmidt’s own policies mostly ban electronic devices, unless students have a specific need for them, such as researching a topic or doing group work. She also highlighted another issue – that even when students are using computers for academic use, some students who type slowly or can’t type without looking at the keyboard can be distracted by that, and in some cases, students are irritated by the sounds of keys clacking.

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Time for Change

There’s something unnerving yet exciting about starting a new school year.

For those who are just starting out, get ready for one of the most transformative experiences of your lives…no pressure.

A new school year brings new opportunities for involvement and growth.

It is a chance to be the person you’ve always hoped you’d be, and there is something nerve-wracking but ultimately beautiful in that.

Sure, there’s always the fear of letting yourself down and realizing that maybe you weren’t as good at something as you thought you were.

But the anticipation of new experiences and the idea that maybe this year will be your year, far outweighs the negative, at least, in my opinion.

This school year, there will be challenges for many, including myself.

 I have always been enchanted with the idea that I have another year of school to improve myself.

Having another year to face new challenges, accomplish new goals, and see the growth that I had hoped I would see has been one of the highlights of my time here.

But this year is different; it is different because it is my last one.

As a senior, I am seeing that no longer will I have the same opportunities that this University has given me in the past.

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Welcome to the Family, Prospective Student…

Dear Prospective Student:

We, The Outlook Staff, want to welcome you to what could be the most incredible college experience in your lifetime. Deciding to go to Monmouth University will be the greatest life decision you make; trust us, we know from experience.

There is so much to love about being an MU student. It’s impossible to share with you every single thing that we cherish on this campus, but we can try. You’ve heard the commercials and we’re sure you have heard about how we are located right by the beach and have a to-die-for, beautiful campus (#7 on Buzzfeed’s Top 25 Most Beautiful Campuses in the World in 2015), but it doesn’t mean anything until you actually step foot on campus.

One editor claimed, “I immediately fell in love with the campus. It was close to the beach, it was beautiful, and everyone seemed so happy and nice. I knew that this was undoubtedly the place I needed to go to.”

Another editor added, “It isn’t just that you can sit on the beach and relax when it’s warm. There are a lot of good places to eat that are on the beach and you can also walk the boardwalk when it’s nice out near Pier Village and get ice cream at Strollo’s Lighthouse. There’s the typical stuff to do like most towns, but the beach as an everyday view is an added bonus.”

Besides what surrounds the campus, the campus itself is an absolute joy to be on as well. Some of our favorite buildings on campus are the OceanFirst Bank Center, Jules L. Plangere Center, and Wilson Hall. You tend to fall in love with the building you are in the most. For most editors, that means the Jules L. Plangere Center, which is the building for communication studies.

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Reporting on Sexual Assault

It is uncomfortable and almost unspeakable, but we have to talk about sexual assault on campus. According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 1 in 5 college women and 1 in 16 college men who have likely been a victim of some form of sexual assault.

The Outlook Staff weighs in to discuss the awareness of sexual assault on campus and the impact it has had as April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. This semester the Monmouth University Police Department (MUPD) stated that they have received two reports of sexual misconduct and one report of sexual assault on campus. However, many editors believe that there are more sexual assaults and misconducts on campus and off campus that go unreported.

One editor brought up the statistic that The Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN) provided: only 20 percent of sexual assault cases are reported on college campuses. According to the University site, “Many victims do not report because they are afraid of what others may say or think. They feel like what happened is their fault because they were drinking or they went someplace they had been warned could be dangerous.”

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‘Tech’ Your Gadgets at the Door

Particles of chalk dust in the air and textbooks covered with Book Sox’s on rows of desks have become a distant memory of the typical classroom for many college students. Chalkboards have been replaced by projectors and the need for lugging heavy textbooks across campus is no longer necessary with the endless information available on smartphones and tablets. The ubiquitous nature of technology has begun to spark much debate on the integration of these devices within the classroom.

Both educators and students are torn between the restrictions and benefits that device usage will bring to the classroom experience. Technology has impacted every facet of our everyday lives including the ways in which we gain and process knowledge.

The use of PowerPoint presentations, conducting research online about course material, efficient note taking, and the ability to connect and collaborate with fellow classmates on assignments outside of the classroom were seen as beneficial aspects of technology use within the classroom by editors.

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Hawks Should Soar Beyond the Classroom Door

Getting involved on campus is a phrase that has been drilled into our minds since orientation, but it can truly make a huge difference in your college experience. Joining organizations that coincide with your major provide hands on experiences, one-on-one mentorship, and networking opportunities.

As college students, we all wonder what we can do to stand out in our resume in the hopes of being hired for an internship or career. Increasing our education outside of the classroom is an effective way to expand networks, gain new skills and experiences, and learn from others, whether it be attending events on campus or venturing out to a conference.

One editor reflected on a time that The Outlook provided him with an opportunity to write an article to be printed in a newspaper in another state. After interning for the Asbury Park Press over the summer, a journalist recognized him from his attendance at every Monmouth football and basketball game. This journalist reached out to the editor and gave him the opportunity to cover a game in Mississippi.

“He was looking for a story around 400 words focusing on Ole Miss by 10 p.m. EST. I told him that I would make it happen,” said the editor. “This was a really good experience that would not have happened if all I did was go to class.”

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A Welcome Letter to Our President

Dear President Grey Dimenna,

As you know, Monmouth University is a wonderful place. The University itself has been thriving recently and we feel that you are returning at an ideal time to continue that legacy. Your previous 21 years of experience and your familiarity with the school will certainly be beneficial in your new role and we look forward to working with you during your time as Interim President.

Monmouth’s campus is constantly improving with various new initiatives, and we have faith that you will continue to help us on our path to success. We are hopeful that you will continue to lead Monmouth in the right direction and aid in the growth of the University.

While there are certainly positives about the current state of the University, there are is always room for improvement. We hope that you listen to student voices and ensure that any pertinent issues are addressed ethically.

We hope that you will put your best foot forward in leading Monmouth in the right direction as far as quality of education, community interactions, and fostering creativity for every single student.

We hope that you continue to promote inclusiveness of all ethnicities, races, and genders represented throughout the student body on campus, and we think that you will do a wonderful job since you are no stranger to Monmouth University and our evolving campus culture.

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How Green is MU?

As more and more universities pledge to ‘go green’ in an attempt to save the environment, not much is known about Monmouth’s eco-friendly initiatives.

While sustainability on campus is not usually a major deciding factor when it comes to incoming students, people certainly desire a college that puts forth an effort with regard to recycling and conservation. Much like investing in a quality education, eco-friendly initiatives show prospective and current students, alumni, and parents that the University is making an investment in the Earth’s future.

The Outlook staff believes that MU’s green initiatives are rather mysterious, and no one really understands the process.

“I don’t really know that much about the recycling process at Monmouth, because I haven’t asked or really ever heard anyone talk about it,” said one editor.

Many editors recall seeing the trash and recycling bins being thrown into the same bag when the janitors arrive to discard it.

“It’s obvious that we have different places to throw trash and recycling because they’re usually labeled,” another editor said. “But when the trash is being taken out, I’ve seen both garbage and recycling cans be dumped into the same larger garbage can. So, basically, it’s undoing the purpose of having somewhere to throw trash and somewhere to recycle.”

Other universities around the nation are introducing new initiatives such as campus-wide bans on plastic bags, community gardens, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings, and green cleaning programs.

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Hawks Talk Hybrids

Technology is always changing and developing, and it seems that finding a way to adapt to these frequent changes has become necessary. With so much of our lives being online, from our personal profiles to the way we communicate, it makes sense why technology should have a place in education as well. Hybrid and online courses at Monmouth University has given students the option to learn outside of the traditional classroom.

According to the spring 2017 course catalog, there were 138 hybrid courses offered this semester, as well as 68 completely online courses. Students are able to participate in an online class through eCampus.

Laura Moriarty, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, believes that it is the University’s responsibility to make it easier for students to be able to balance both their education and their personal lives. “Such programs meet a need for a student population that is working full time and yet sees the value in continuing their education. It’s not easy to work full time and come to campus for a 3-hour class after a long day at work. Students in hybrid and online courses have the ability to learn when they can devote time to that process,” said Moriarty.

One editor said, “I think that hybrid courses are a great asset to the University’s students. I have a friend who has a six-year-old child and tries to opt for hybrid or online courses so that she can have more time to spend with her daughter and maintain a job. I think these options expand our University’s accessibility for non-traditional students.”

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University Runs its First Super Bowl Commercial

Superb[owl] Reception


MU First Superbowl Commercial

The Super Bowl is widely known as one of the most watched events on television. An article from The Hollywood Reporter reported that 113.7 million viewers tuned in for this year’s event, which was tied for the second-most-watched Super Bowl of all-time, creating an optimal opportunity for companies to advertise. Monmouth seized this opportunity for the first time ever.

The University decided to run a 30-second advertisement in the Philadelphia market on FOX 29 WTXF right before the second half. The advertisement, which has been run by the University on their ESPN3 broadcasts throughout the year, featured men’s basketball Head Coach King Rice.

The commercial started with a flashback to the team’s defeat to Iona in last year’s Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) Championship Game, with Rice’s voice saying, “They say one single moment can mean everything. They’re right.”

Rice went on to say, “A moment can test limits, measure heart, and defy expectations. It can make your legs heavy, and your lungs burn. And how you respond to it will determine who you are, and who you become.”

Tara Peters, Associate Vice President of Marketing and Communications, stated that the goals of the commercial were to “create awareness, enhance reputation, and build pride for Monmouth University.”

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Pressing Issues of the Press

We, as journalists, have studied the famous case of the Watergate scandal that happened in Richard Nixon’s time in the White House. The editorial staff has learned about the importance of checking in on government, and most obviously, the powerful role of the Press. It has been engrained into the minds of journalism students that the press would do their best to warn and protect the people if there is any form of wrongdoing in any of the branches. This goes for positive things as well – the Press is an overall information source for people everywhere.

Now, President Donald Trump is in office and has been making some waves with the media, something that he has had ups and downs with his entire campaign. Trump’s Chief Strategist, Steve Bannon, said in a press conference, “The media should be embarrassed and humiliated and keep its mouth shut and just listen for awhile.”

This begs the question, should the press do such a thing?

It’s no surprise that the President would like his privacy. For instance, one editor brought the issue of misrepresentation to light in explaining his relationship with the media. This editor said, “As Ben Parker in Spiderman would say, ‘With great power comes great responsibility.’ We, as journalists, have the power to investigate. We have the power to share stories in an unbiased manner and inform the public of key issues. But, when agendas are prevalent, we have the power to influence and wrongfully mislead, and that counteracts the core values that we as journalists should preserve. I think that is what Trump – or any appointed person in power – fears: skewed news and misrepresentation.”

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Contact Information

CAMPUS LOCATION
The Outlook
Jules L. Plangere Jr. Center for Communication
and Instructional Technology (CCIT)
Room 260, 2nd floor

MAILING ADDRESS
The Outlook
Monmouth University
400 Cedar Ave, West Long Branch, New Jersey
07764

Phone: (732) 571-3481 | Fax: (732) 263-5151
Email: outlook@monmouth.edu